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A few questions

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

I am a freshman in college and I have been snowboarding since 3rd grade.  Two seasons ago I suffered a broken pelvis and I needed surgery (6 screws and a plate) to fix it. I am completely comfortable on the mountain, able to snowboard goofy and regular and I'm no longer really into freestyle and I really want to try skiing. 

 

I am going to rent my first season of skis just to try it out and I have a few questions.  When I go in to get my rentals, is there anything I should ask for specifically? How should the boots feel when I put them on? I know the staff will answer my questions when I'm there, but I want to go in with a bit of background knowledge.

 

If I ski at the same mountain I have been snowboarding at for the past 10 years, and go about 8 times this season, how far should I expect to progress?

 

I'm really excited to try out skiing, I love the way a good skier flows down the mountain and I like the challenge of learning a new sport.  Any insight is greatly appreciated.

 

Andrew

 

Edit: Also, when looking at skis online I get a  range of numbers.  Let me see if I have this right,  Length is obvious, tip to tail.  Radius is harder for me to explain but a bigger radius means the ski will naturally make longer turns? And the sidecut is listed as tip-waist-tail? In mm right? Thanks =)

post #2 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Awilkens503

 

Edit: Also, when looking at skis online I get a  range of numbers.  Let me see if I have this right,  Length is obvious, tip to tail.  Radius is harder for me to explain but a bigger radius means the ski will naturally make longer turns? And the sidecut is listed as tip-waist-tail? In mm right? Thanks =)


Welcome to the bright side Andrew.

 

Your edit looks like you've got it about right.  Radius is kind of theoretical.  Basically the more sidecut a ski has the tighter the turn it will make when tilted on edge.  Snowboards are designed with similar geometry.  So theoretically a ski with a 15 meter turning radius will scribe a 15 meter turn.  That turn size can & will be manipulated with input from the skier, but those are the basics.

 

As most everyone will tell you on here, well fitting boots are going to be your most important piece of equipment as a key to rapid success & enjoyment.  Rental boots are usually not the best, but nothing wrong with starting on them.  They should fit snugly with a little wiggle room for your toes.  Having your heel sucked into the back of the boot is optimum.  Basic beginner rental skis are fine for the first season, & trying some demos as you progress will help you decide what to purchase later on.

 

Your snowboarding experience should quicken the learning curve for you.  I know for me after being a life long skier, learning to snowboard was pretty quick.  It was about 20 days to be able to link solid turns on most slopes in various conditions.  I have also taught a few snowboarders to ski, & I have usually been able to use an accelerated process to get them to an upper intermediate level within a few days.  Of course, lessons will accelerate the learning process along with focused practice, but you already possess many of the required skills.

 

Good luck,

 

JF

post #3 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Awilkens503 View Post

I am a freshman in college and I have been snowboarding since 3rd grade.  Two seasons ago I suffered a broken pelvis and I needed surgery (6 screws and a plate) to fix it. I am completely comfortable on the mountain, able to snowboard goofy and regular and I'm no longer really into freestyle and I really want to try skiing. 

 

I am going to rent my first season of skis just to try it out and I have a few questions.  When I go in to get my rentals, is there anything I should ask for specifically? How should the boots feel when I put them on? I know the staff will answer my questions when I'm there, but I want to go in with a bit of background knowledge.

 

If I ski at the same mountain I have been snowboarding at for the past 10 years, and go about 8 times this season, how far should I expect to progress?

 

I'm really excited to try out skiing, I love the way a good skier flows down the mountain and I like the challenge of learning a new sport.  Any insight is greatly appreciated.

 

Andrew

 

Edit: Also, when looking at skis online I get a  range of numbers.  Let me see if I have this right,  Length is obvious, tip to tail.  Radius is harder for me to explain but a bigger radius means the ski will naturally make longer turns? And the sidecut is listed as tip-waist-tail? In mm right? Thanks =)



Andrew.   Go back through the Beginner Forum to where it began and you will see a lot of posts on subjects that will answer your questions. A young guy like yourself, with your on the snow experience should be skiing after a single lesson on the basics.  After that you will advance very rapidly, as you know time on the snow really matters. Do recommend that after you go on your own for a day and think you're getting it, then that is the time to take another lesson.  This will advance you faster and might prevent you from adopting some bad/wrong habits.  Have a great winter.  Welcome to Epic.

post #4 of 7

Agreed, you won't have nearly the learning curve that someone who's never spent much time on the snow will encounter. As stated, just browse the beginner section and you'll see a lot of info.

 

To give you one thought though: just like in snowboarding where you are on your toeside edge or your heelside edge, in skiing, you will be either on your left edge or right edge. This is when you are in the most control, stable and are ready to turn. When you are gliding & not using your edges, you have the least amount of control.

 

Enjoy your new hobby!!!!

post #5 of 7
Thread Starter 

Thank you everyone for your responses, I have sifted through the posts in the start of the beginner section, there is some good stuff in there that gets me really excited for winter. Also, I've looked into mountains and ski packages and I discovered the greatest thing ever invented.  College student discounts. <3 

 

I really, really, want to ski. Now.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by JHoback View Post
To give you one thought though: just like in snowboarding where you are on your toeside edge or your heelside edge, in skiing, you will be either on your left edge or right edge. This is when you are in the most control, stable and are ready to turn. When you are gliding & not using your edges, you have the least amount of control.

 

Thanks for this thought, it helps me visualize skiing a little better.

 

I want winter. I want snow. I want skis. 

 

Again, thank you everyone.

 

Andrew

 
post #6 of 7


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mattsteel5 View Post

 

 I love the way a good skier flows down the mountain and I like the challenge of learning a new sport.  Any insight is greatly appreciated.



Mattstee;5,  Give us some information on yourself and I am sure some Bears will chip in here with some worthwhile info.   Example;  do you ski, how much and how well, are you a beginner and if so how many times have you skied.  Equipment you use and where do you ski.  What, so far, do you like to do on the snow?  Flowing down the mountain,  is an accomplishment some skiers never obtain and yet some others will do this almost right away. It is a rewarding feeling to ski with the mountain and her terrain instead of having the terrain making you balk and be defensive.

post #7 of 7

 

Quote:
How should the boots feel when I put them on?

The very smallest size you can wear without discomfort.  Go down in size until they are too small, then go up one half size.  Keep in mind that generally the boot shell is sized in full steps and the thickness of the liner gives half sizes.  If one is too big, go down a full size.  The shop guys should be good with ski size...usually about chin high, maybe a bit less.  With skis the longer they are the stiffer they are.  Skis that are too stiff are difficult to turn.  Take a pole and hold it upside down, grip on the floor, your hand around the tip against the basket.  If your forearm is level horizontal, the pole size is right.

 

Remember...never, ever heel side on skis.  Always centered or weight on your toes.

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