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#1 place to live in the U.S. for skiers - Page 2

post #31 of 48

I vaguely recall that being the case. And there's talk about the boom in the town (village?) next door right outside of the park border (forgot the name)

 

Personally, I'd prefer Calgary.

post #32 of 48

I think you're talking about Canmore...which isn't all that close to the skiing as I recall, nor very picturesque as seen from the highway.  I'd think it wouldn't qualify for a great ski town to live in because most likely your employment will have to be back in Calgary and yet you're not right by the slopes. 
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by at_nyc View Post

I vaguely recall that being the case. And there's talk about the boom in the town (village?) next door right outside of the park border (forgot the name)

 

Personally, I'd prefer Calgary.

post #33 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

I think you're talking about Canmore...which isn't all that close to the skiing as I recall, nor very picturesque as seen from the highway.  I'd think it wouldn't qualify for a great ski town to live in because most likely your employment will have to be back in Calgary and yet you're not right by the slopes. 
 


The village/town isn't pretty archictecturally when seen from the highway. But the surrounding is every bit as beautiful as Banff. Well, you're looking at more or less the same group of mountains...

 

Banff isn't exact slopeside either. So, I'm not sure what different an extra 5-10 minutes make. And for that matter, the village of Jackson Hole isn't at the foot of the ski resort either...
 

I can see if someone actually live IN Jackson village, it'd be pretty cool to stroll out the door into the shops and such. That won't be possible for Canmore... But somehow I doubt that's what qualify Jackson Hole as the best ski town in the US. 

post #34 of 48

I have to confess to never having been there!  I think the real estate is more expensive there, tho, and that's enough to negate it for me.  The mountain here isn't as "gnarly", but then I'm not gnarly either. 
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by at_nyc View Post

But somehow I doubt that's what qualify Jackson Hole as the best ski town in the US. 
post #35 of 48



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

I have to confess to never having been there!  I think the real estate is more expensive there, tho, and that's enough to negate it for me.  The mountain here isn't as "gnarly", but then I'm not gnarly either. 
 

 

I think this very much sums up the uselessness of these "best" place for skier/mtn biker/surfer whatever list. Because just because someone skis, doesn't mean he or she is equally server in Jackson Hole or in Whitefish. Some one might prefer the ngarl of Jackson Hole, other who rather cruise and rack up verticle might not care for all the gnarl! So what's best one doesn't neccessarily apply to another. Frankly, I don't really care about what's "best" for others. Because when it comes time to choose where to live, I live where's best FOR ME!

post #36 of 48
Thread Starter 

If magazines couldn't tout articles about the best this or that, we wouldn't have magazines, or websites, for that matter. 

post #37 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by nolo View Post

If magazines couldn't tout articles about the best this or that, we wouldn't have magazines, or websites, for that matter. 



One of the reasons I don't buy those magazines.

post #38 of 48
Thread Starter 

Touche.

post #39 of 48

I got cold here for a while, really cold, and it was so hard just to cope and keep the house warm. All I could think during that cold snap was: you can have Montana and Wyoming, it's just too much work fighting the cold (unless you have the dough to have help with the plowing and firewood and the gas bill) There is a huge difference between heating your house in 26 degrees vs 5 degrees, huge.

 

Similar may be said about the altitude in Co. Coastal ranges are good by me.

post #40 of 48

JH definitely has some of the best skiing in the Country, when the snow and weather are good, but those last two do not come together as often at JH as they do at many other places.  When it's good, it is exceptional, the question is how much are you willing to endure or gamble to get it?

post #41 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by mudfoot View Post

JH definitely has some of the best skiing in the Country, when the snow and weather are good, but those last two do not come together as often at JH as they do at many other places.  When it's good, it is exceptional, the question is how much are you willing to endure or gamble to get it?



Exactly right.  Hopefully, lots of those folk there will figure that out and move to Durango, Bozeman, or Telluride so I can afford a house in Jackson.

 

Even when the snow and weather don't coincide, it is one of the most beautiful places in the world.

 

Mike

post #42 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by habacomike View Post

 

Even when the snow and weather don't coincide, it is one of the most beautiful places in the world.

 

Mike


 

I cannot agree more.  Plus, it has some of the best sidecountry and backcountry access in the country.
 

post #43 of 48

5 degrees?  That's just normal.  Try -20 degrees 
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

I got cold here for a while, really cold, and it was so hard just to cope and keep the house warm. All I could think during that cold snap was: you can have Montana and Wyoming, it's just too much work fighting the cold (unless you have the dough to have help with the plowing and firewood and the gas bill) There is a huge difference between heating your house in 26 degrees vs 5 degrees, huge.

 

Similar may be said about the altitude in Co. Coastal ranges are good by me.

post #44 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by tetonpwdrjunkie View Post

5 degrees?  That's just normal.  Try -20 degrees 
 


 


I have no idea how you guys do it. do you put on like 30 pounds before winter for insulation like a polar mamal? So many older homes here were built as summer homes, gaps at every joint. That wouldn't fly in Wyoming. So, to the thread, live in some places, better buy a solid home, winterized.

post #45 of 48

Efficient wood-burning fireplace in addition to radiant floor heating (great since we're at the very end of an electrical line that seems to stop working for hours on end frequently).  Currently spending weekends chainsawing downed trees on the property and splitting for firewood.  Propane can cost $1000 per tank fill in mid-winter and the husband sets the thermostats at 64 (really wants to go lower, but my daughter and I are in full revolt since we are already wearing NOW in October outside jackets in the house...he won't let us turn on the heat yet!  Wants to wait for November.)  On the other hand, we never installed air conditioning and never ever need it in the summer, so we save on that end.  NW Montana, currently the forecast is calling for highs of low 40's for our house in the coming week.  I still haven't finished harvesting my tomatoes....
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post




I have no idea how you guys do it. do you put on like 30 pounds before winter for insulation like a polar mamal? So many older homes here were built as summer homes, gaps at every joint. That wouldn't fly in Wyoming. So, to the thread, live in some places, better buy a solid home, winterized.

post #46 of 48

how about radiant heating where the pipes go through (zig zag across the inner side of the top sheet of iron)  the efficient wood burning stove? It's a wiener, let's invent it! 

sounds like at the moment it's colder here. snow coats the upper mountain of Squaw. If our snowpack arrives, we have a good frozen mountain to take it.

 

By the way, on topic, Tahoe could use a major influx to stop them from closing down more schools. Population of full time residents must be plummeting in the region.

post #47 of 48

I'd say Port Antonio, Jamaica..

 

Skiing on the river all year long....extended season for Rasta doods.

 

 

Not in the U.S?    Can't have everything, oh well!

post #48 of 48

We haven't run the heat yet either.  Also trying to get into November.  I watch TV under a blanket, but I can't see my breath...  Yet.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Efficient wood-burning fireplace in addition to radiant floor heating (great since we're at the very end of an electrical line that seems to stop working for hours on end frequently).  Currently spending weekends chainsawing downed trees on the property and splitting for firewood.  Propane can cost $1000 per tank fill in mid-winter and the husband sets the thermostats at 64 (really wants to go lower, but my daughter and I are in full revolt since we are already wearing NOW in October outside jackets in the house...he won't let us turn on the heat yet!  Wants to wait for November.)  On the other hand, we never installed air conditioning and never ever need it in the summer, so we save on that end.  NW Montana, currently the forecast is calling for highs of low 40's for our house in the coming week.  I still haven't finished harvesting my tomatoes....
 


 
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