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Why do goggles fog up?

post #1 of 39
Thread Starter 

 

Oct 11, 2010

 

Hi Bears:

 

In another thread discussing the pros and cons of the Smith no-fog cloth, I stated that for me, when I overheat, my goggles are prone to fogging up.  Usually, I don't have a problem with goggles fogging up.  What are your reasons for your goggles fogging up. (I am providing the link to the other tread as follows:)

 

http://www.epicski.com/forum/thread/96626/ode-to-the-venerable-no-fog-cloth-by-smith-the-how-do-i-use-it-thread

 

Think snow,

 

CP

post #2 of 39

Answers.com

 

Why do glasses fog up?

 

Because when you are outside in the cold and you go inside a house where it is warm, the heat will cool off and the cold will heat up at the same time so they fog up

 

post #3 of 39

Why do my glasses fog up when I'm drinking hot coffee?

post #4 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieP View Post

In another thread discussing the pros and cons of the Smith no-fog cloth, I stated that for me, when I overheat, my goggles are prone to fogging up.  Usually, I don't have a problem with goggles fogging up.  What are your reasons for your goggles fogging up. (I am providing the link to the other tread as follows:)

http://www.epicski.com/forum/thread/96626/ode-to-the-venerable-no-fog-cloth-by-smith-the-how-do-i-use-it-thread

Think snow,

CP


My goggles always used to fog up.  Nothing would stop it.  Then one day I noticed that there was a gap between the bridge of my nose and the foam on the edge of the goggle where it's supposed to rest against the nose.  Turns out it was my warm moist breath traveling up into the goggles through that gap that fogged them up.  I filled the gap with extra foam cut away from old goggles, and the fogging immediately stopped.  I do this now with every pair of goggles I get.  Fog's all gone.

post #5 of 39


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by catskills View Post

Answers.com

 

Why do glasses fog up?

 

Because when you are outside in the cold and you go inside a house where it is warm, the heat will cool off and the cold will heat up at the same time so they fog up

 

 

Wow.  Uh... science fail.

 

Goggles fog up due to condensation.  Warm, wet air, usually from either sweat or your breath, condenses on the lenses because they are cold(er than the warm air).  If it's snowing/raining, or you're skiing through snow guns, snow or water sticking to your goggles may evaporate due to your body heat and then recondense.

 

Good ventilation helps the water evaporate away, since very cold air is also usually very dry.  (Of course, if it's stupidly cold, sometimes the 'fog' just freezes solid instead, which is no fun.)  Anti-fog coatings make it harder for water vapor to stick to the lenses in the first place.

post #6 of 39

Mine fog up cause i carry beer in them

post #7 of 39

My goggles never seemed to fog up; it was always the glasses underneath that fogged.  The thin plastic lenses were worse than the thicker safety glasses.  Fixed that with Lasik.

 

Sometimes the goggles, they fog up because I got snow in them.  Either I swing them up into a patch of snow stuck to my helmet, or I force-feed them snow via the faceplant.  The no-fog cloth sorta helps, but not much.

post #8 of 39

I never had much of a problem with my glasses fogging until I began using a helmet.

 

Someone suggested that I raise my helmet a bit to create a gap between the top of my goggles and the helmet.

 

What do you folk think? 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

post #9 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr5150 View Post

I never had much of a problem with my glasses fogging until I began using a helmet.

 

Someone suggested that I raise my helmet a bit to create a gap between the top of my goggles and the helmet.

 

What do you folk think? 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


That should help if the helmet is truly hindering the air flow through the goggles.  Air needs to go into the goggles via the foam liner on top, and out wherever, in order to dry out the moisture that might be clinging to the inside surfaces.  However, some people hate any gap up there (df:gaper).  

post #10 of 39

actually looking at his helmet its could be an issue. really not making that up...

 

best way to keep goggles from fogging is to not overheat. 

 

I dont overheat skiing ever, and when hiking I either hike with sunglass on and switch to goggles on top, or carry an extra pair of goggles for the ride down.

 

lastly making sure that any gator/fleece you have around your face ISNT tuck into your goggle. those dorky looking neoprene masque cause foggy goggles.

 

post #11 of 39

one main problem is where you store your goggles after you ski, it's very important that the foam around the goggles is dry, once it's wet you are toast. So after a day of skiing leave them out on your desk don't just leave them in the goggle sleeve. Also I always have a spare pair with me in-case I go through the washing machine down a slope hehe or I'm lucky enough u get face shoots smile.gif))

post #12 of 39

Why do goggles fog up?

 

here's one reason..

local_lange_girl_2010.jpg

post #13 of 39
Thread Starter 

Oct 13, 2010

 

Hi cigrldart:

 

Enough said (or more to the point, Enough seen.  Fogging up).  QED  .

 

Think snow,

 

CP


Edited by CharlieP - 10/13/10 at 11:59am
post #14 of 39

because too many hot babes ski by me

post #15 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

Why do goggles fog up?

 

here's one reason..

local_lange_girl_2010.jpg


Besides me starting to  breath hard, my goggles just fogged up...

The problem is they are in my backpack in the closet.
 

post #16 of 39

What's everyone looking at?   My goggles are fogged & I can't see.

post #17 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Old Boot View Post

Mine fog up cause i carry beer in them



Brother Boot, which lens to you find most effective for the beer carry - or does it depend on the beer? That is, dark beer = dark lens, or the converse?

D1

post #18 of 39

How safe can helmets be if they make your goggles fog and you can't see? 

 

Just a thought to consider. 

post #19 of 39

I wear a helmet and my goggles don't fog up.

 

Obviously no hot naked guys around on the slopes here....
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stranger View Post

How safe can helmets be if they make your goggles fog and you can't see? 

 

Just a thought to consider. 

post #20 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stranger View Post

How safe can helmets be if they make your goggles fog and you can't see? 

 

Just a thought to consider. 


Actually, you're less likely to fog with a helmet than you would a beanie. Your beanie ends up being worn under your goggles, thus transfering moisture inside the goggle. It's also smart to take into account that at times your helmet might be much warmer than a beanie also especially if you don't have venting options. So one should dress accordingly.

post #21 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stranger View Post

How safe can helmets be if they make your goggles fog and you can't see? 

 

Just a thought to consider. 



Son of Helmet Thread.

post #22 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stranger View Post

How safe can helmets be if they make your goggles fog and you can't see? 

 

Just a thought to consider. 



I wear a helmet and my goggle dont fog while skiing. I was saying that praticular helmet can cuase fogging.

post #23 of 39

I have to ditch the helmet on warm humid days to avoid instant goggle fog up. 

post #24 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mdskier View Post

I have to ditch the helmet on warm humid days to avoid instant goggle fog up. 



What kind of helmet?

post #25 of 39

Mine personally fog up alot because of sweat, but I am accustomed to it happening so every couple of mintues i lift up my goggle to let in a little ventalation and cool myself off. I find that once I first start to see the fog starting to build up on my lense if I just lift up my goggle for like 3-5 seconds that will do the trick till the end of the run.

post #26 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mdskier View Post

I have to ditch the helmet on warm humid days to avoid instant goggle fog up. 



funny I dont.....

post #27 of 39

Well don't do this in Montana in January, it'll freeze instantly.  You need goggles with better ventilation.  Maybe open up the foam a bit on the lower side?  Or take a layer off of your body? 
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by underpressure View Post

Mine personally fog up alot because of sweat, but I am accustomed to it happening so every couple of mintues i lift up my goggle to let in a little ventalation and cool myself off. I find that once I first start to see the fog starting to build up on my lense if I just lift up my goggle for like 3-5 seconds that will do the trick till the end of the run.

post #28 of 39

It's a mixture of a lot of things! The main factors are moisture/humidity and the temp difference between the inside of the lens and the outside conditions. Inevitably all 'traditional' goggles will fog because even the best anti fog coatings will be overwhelmed at some stage - especically if you sweat and it's cold outside. The newest ones have built in fans and even a heated lens. This combination solves the problem!

post #29 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scottie Mac View Post

The newest ones have built in fans and even a heated lens. This combination solves the problem!



So does a little bit of saliva. That's right.  Spit on a cloth and wipe the inside of the lens and they will be fog free all day..

drool.gif

cool.gif

 

 

Quote:

Home recipes

One method to prevent fogging is to apply a thin film of detergent, but this method is criticized because detergents are designed to be water soluble and they cause smearing.[5]Divers often use saliva,[6] which is a commonly known and effective anti-fogging agent.[7] Other home recipes exist, including the application of white vinegar with hot water,[8] or a mixture containing sudsy ammonia, alcohol and liquid dishwasher detergent .[9]

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-fog

 

post #30 of 39

This is a way old resurrected post, but since it's back open to discussion, i'm throwing in my 2cents, since i disagree with the above advice.

 

I think if you're trying to treat the interior of a modern goggle lens with anything, you're making things worse by wiping away the built-in anti-fog coating.  All of them say don't wipe with anything, even anti-fog solution.  The built-in coating is a gel-like coating, thicker then anything what you're ever going to be able to smoothly apply with aftermarket stuff, but it is a fragile layer not something sturdy .  If you've wiped on this gel with anything wet, I'd say you've already ruined the anti-fog coating.  You are better off getting a new lenses.  All the boxes on your goggles says never touch when wet, and never use any anti-fog solution on it(smith included).  

If you've ever made jello, you know you once you've messed with it, you can never get the original smooth top layer back

 

So my advice, never touch inside of lens.  Only if it is completely dry, maybe you can wipe away some dust or lint, or gently polish away a spot.  Figure out the mechanics of why you are overheating and creating so much moisture, but don't mess with the lens thinking you can increase it's anti-fogging ability..

 

I have the smith cloth, and they are made for glass not for snow goggles.  The intended purposes in skiing is for glasses under your OTG.  I have had to ski with glasses and the cloths works really well.   It puts on a topical layer of that is completely optically clear, and not a smeary mess that is spit.  You can think of it like car wax,  the wax is there but you can't see it.  The cloth has a dryer sheet feel to it, it leaves a very thin layer of residue/product.  The other purposes of these cloth as stated on the label is for other glass optics, which means scopes, binoculars, things like that.  Again not for snow goggles which already have a  built-in antifog.

 

 

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