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post #31 of 46


Quote:

Originally Posted by volantaddict View Post

Much longer? What does that mean? Is it a matter of years, or days, or hours?

 

It took me around 139 days on the mountain, to go from a strong, straight-ski, groomer-skidder-hasn't-skied-regularly-in-eighteen-years type skier, to skiing the Gullies and Big Couloir at Big Sky with Little Bear.



Years. 

 

If canali skis 30x per year, it will take him over 4.6 years to ski 139 days.

 

YMMV

 

Yes I'm smarter than a 5th grader

 

"A wise man learns by his mistakes.  An even wiser one learns by someone elses."

 

The intent of lessons is to speed the process up.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim. View Post

Have you ever considered taking an instructor training course? Or a longer term ski improvement camp? I'd say if you really want to improve your skiing that'd be the way to go, I'd only skied for a few weeks before taking mine, 6 weeks of training 3 days a week later I passed my level 2 and improved my skiing and understanding of skiing hugely.  Since then I have trained a lot with demo teamers, examiners etc, but never really had the leaps of improvement that I had in that course again, work (instructing) always gets in the way. I guess having a proper job might make taking that amount of time off pretty difficult though!


I went the instructor route and was most impressed with the level of training we received throughout the entire season.  There are other threads here describing that experience at different mountains.  This is a commitment beyound just taking an instructor training course AND you have to want to teach people to ski.  The ability improvement is incredible.  You also get to meet lots of people and make new friends.

post #32 of 46

Taos ski week for the entire month January and other low season weeks is only $99 with a pass or Taos card.

 

Same with TPJ - If I know then what I know now, I would've started with instructions sooner.

 

   

post #33 of 46

I've used some adult lessons each year for the last decade to make up for my lack of time on the snow. I live in the sunbelt and each ski trip ends at about the time I've become acclimated to the altitude, temperature and ski-specific muscles. Now I'm almost old enough to draw my Social Security and I'm looking forward to a 139 day ski year like my hero VA  . Who knows, maybe I'll even take a trip down the Big Couloir with Ursula! Lessons may speed the process but there is no substitute for PRACTICE - also spelled HARD WORK.

post #34 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by volantaddict View Post


 

 

Much longer? What does that mean? Is it a matter of years, or days, or hours?

 

It took me around 139 days on the mountain, to go from a strong, straight-ski, groomer-skidder-hasn't-skied-regularly-in-eighteen-years type skier, to skiing the Gullies and Big Couloir at Big Sky with Little Bear.

 

I find that the primary difficulty that people have in becoming "real" skiers is not physical skills, but in developing the mind, that releases them to apply their skills; that mind is developed by attempting, and having varying degrees of success, as a process of the mind becoming attuned to initiating the requisite movements, as a second nature, like walking, or feeding one's self.



Agree that the movements will become second nature, you don't think about them they almost just happen. Trick is figuring out what good movements are. I think one has to balance lessons/clinics/ against mileage. Lessons don't refine your skills, skiing does. You may not want or be able to figure it out for yourself but i think for every day you spend in clinic, there are a number of days you have to spend cranking turns to feel some refinement in your skiing.

  

post #35 of 46
Thread Starter 



that is something I have considered: just don't have the $3-5K required...will be buying a home soon so....

 

also as per equipement/technology evolution:

thiswas the primary reason I'm  now so into skiing...my ex gal and I went to Sunpeaks in Kamloops 3 yrs ago (after my 20 yr hiatus)

 for 3 days and I was blown away by the steep upward fun factor and learning curve with the new shaped skis

(hence my getting out 30x last yr)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim. View Post

Have you ever considered taking an instructor training course? Or a longer term ski improvement camp? I'd say if you really want to improve your skiing that'd be the way to go, I'd only skied for a few weeks before taking mine, 6 weeks of training 3 days a week later I passed my level 2 and improved my skiing and understanding of skiing hugely.  Since then I have trained a lot with demo teamers, examiners etc, but never really had the leaps of improvement that I had in that course again, work (instructing) always gets in the way. I guess having a proper job might make taking that amount of time off pretty difficult though!


Edited by canali - 10/8/10 at 10:44am
post #36 of 46

I don't think it's possible to get so good at something that having a good instructor or coach doesn't assist on continued improvement. Tiger Woods has a number of golf coaches and I'm sure none of those coaches can play like Tiger. Olympic level athletes all have coaches. At every level of a sport you can benefit from a trained eye giving feedback. 

 

I don't frequently take lessons but it's something I think is really valuable and if it were more affordable I'd take several each season.  Skiing with better skiers who aren't bashful about giving me feedback on my technique has been really valuable for me.

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post #37 of 46

I did the Keystone adult unlimited lessons last year and enjoyed it overall.  Breck has a similar program that I might do this year.  I have signed up for the Epic Speed Camp this year at Breck

post #38 of 46
Thread Starter 

 

for any whistler people:

 

(and others who've done this) I just phoned their ski school GM (Bart) 

...was told of a 'Club Linc' that cost $679 and the same group of people (40 max allowed) meet each Sat all day

 for 20x...he says it's VERY popular and a great way to make new ski buddies of similar ability and also get great instruction

 from someone who gets to really know your style...I just might post separately on this as we get closer to ski season when more whistler people will

 be on here, to get their feedback.

 

some other Whistler  lesson ''add ons'' are here

http://www.whistlerblackcomb.com/tickets/seasonpass/pass_addons/index.htm 

...so am unsure at this point


Edited by canali - 10/8/10 at 10:41am
post #39 of 46

 

Quote:

...was told of a 'Club Linc' that cost $679 and the same group of people (40 max allowed) meet each Sat all day

 for 20x...he says it's VERY popular and a great way to make new ski buddies of similar ability and also get great instruction

 from someone who gets to really know your style...

 

You didn't start out asking for really specific advice, so I didn't mention it before, but a lot of mountains have some kind of program like this.

 

These programs can be a really good value.  Not only is the $/hour of lesson lower -- sometimes much lower -- but you tend to get more senior instructors, especially if it's a program geared towards intermediate/advanced skiers.  Plus the advantage of working with the same coach/instructor multiple times (which I guess could also be a disadvantage, if you don't click with them.)  As they get to see you ski more, they should be able to give better feedback, and they can work on skill progressions with you over a longer period of time.

 

Becoming a part-time instructor also nets you lots of free instruction, but you do have to work, too.  At least sometimes.

post #40 of 46
Thread Starter 

thanks!...i just updated the post to be both general and also mention Whistler's lesson add-on programs, hoping to get some feedback

(esp on Club Linc)

post #41 of 46

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post

 


If canali skis 30x per year, it will take him over 4.6 years to ski 139 days.

 

YMMV

 

Yes I'm smarter than a 5th grader

 

"A wise man learns by his mistakes.  An even wiser one learns by someone elses."

 

.

Why would one only ski 30x per year?

 

For me that was just over two seasons (before I started skiing seven days a week). If one stretched it over five seasons I doubt there would be the same rate of progression. One can learn more in 75 days in one season, than 75 days in two seasons, because it allows an uninterrupted progression of development.

 

That saying sounds very clever, but one can't learn by an other's mistakes when it comes to training one's body to perform physical tasks. One has to go through the motions to become a strong skier, and that means time on skis. One can learn technique quickly through instruction, but intuitive fluidly in applying it comes from repetition of the motion until it no longer takes conscious attention.

post #42 of 46
Thread Starter 


35x

 

not my goal padre...aiming for 35-50x......esp if I hook up with that  whistler club linc program

 ($700ish) and awhistler season's pass $1000 (15 lift passes) or $1400ish for unlimited (early bird rate)

 ..nothing like some -gulp- financial obligation to make you go.

ay vay...to really get into skiing it is not a cheap man's sport is it?...
 well that's my winter vacation budget spent..

 

that might work well too: ski locally at cypress 2-3 nights during the week

and then on Sat head to whistler for the club linc or whatever I decide to really flesh things out.

...so with 3x per wk starting late nov or early dec I should be on track for 35-50x/yr goal.

 

 (not sure if my watea 84 skis will have enough grip once temps drop and things get more icy...oh well

 ...those Mythic Riders (offered $329 a pair in my size)

look better and better...or at the Whistler turkey sale can look for some firm carvers for my local Cypress mtn)

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by volantaddict View Post

Why would one only ski 30x per year?

 

For me that was just over two seasons (before I started skiing seven days a week). If one stretched it over five seasons I doubt there would be the same rate of progression. One can learn more in 75 days in one season, than 75 days in two seasons, because it allows an uninterrupted progression of development.

 

That saying sounds very clever, but one can't learn by an other's mistakes when it comes to training one's body to perform physical tasks. One has to go through the motions to become a strong skier, and that means time on skis. One can learn technique quickly through instruction, but intuitive fluidly in applying it comes from repetition of the motion until it no longer takes conscious attention.


Edited by canali - 10/8/10 at 12:58pm
post #43 of 46


 

Quote:

Originally Posted by volantaddict View Post

 

Why would one only ski 30x per year?

 

For me that was just over two seasons (before I started skiing seven days a week). If one stretched it over five seasons I doubt there would be the same rate of progression. One can learn more in 75 days in one season, than 75 days in two seasons, because it allows an uninterrupted progression of development.

 

Darn that pesky "real life"!  Of course, then the question becomes "why don't you reorganize your life so you can ski more?", but that's not always practical, at least in the short term. 

 

Quote:
"A wise man learns by his mistakes.  An even wiser one learns by someone elses."
 
That saying sounds very clever, but one can't learn by an other's mistakes when it comes to training one's body to perform physical tasks. One has to go through the motions to become a strong skier, and that means time on skis. One can learn technique quickly through instruction, but intuitive fluidly in applying it comes from repetition of the motion until it no longer takes conscious attention.


Well... you can and you can't.  If you don't have good technique, you have to figure the technique out yourself before you'll get very far.  You can figure out technique by trial/error or imitating other people, sure.  But if you do it entirely that way you might spend a lot of time learning and practicing techniques that don't work, or don't work well.  (Though to be fair, subpar instruction might not be any better than that.)

 

But you're absolutely correct that it takes tons and tons of practice to really master anything.  You can't buy that.  A good teacher can show you what to do and tell you if you're doing it well, but they can't do it for you.

post #44 of 46

I'm ok with my skill set currently for most resort property open terrain..  But, I would give serious consideration to hiring a guide should I get an opportunity to ski back country that is known to be avi prone or difficult to navigate back from.  I'd consider that "lessons" too since it is a skiing related learning experience, just more terrain and  avi safety or specific geography related learning.  Nevertheless, I do see that need/requirement somewhere in my future.

post #45 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by volantaddict View Post

Why would one only ski 30x per year?


Not everyone have the luxury to be ski-bums
 

post #46 of 46



 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by canali View Post

35x

 

not my goal padre...aiming for 35-50x......esp if I hook up with that club linc progra, ($700ish) and a season's pass $1000 or $1300) at whistler...

 ..nothing like some -gulp- financial obligation to make you go.

ay vay...to really get into skiing it is not a cheap man's sport is it?...

If I wanted the benefit of lessons, I would take a single lesson and get some points on things to work on, then practice it for a while before going back to the well.

 

Oh, and just to clarify my 139 day progression, I was charging the bowls at Snowbowl within 50 days or so. I just used 139 because I didn't make it out to Big Sky to ski with Ursula until the end of my second full season after returning to the slopes, I was pretty strong on my skis by then. I hadn't planned on skiing the Big, Ursula lead the progression that day; first with some more moderate terrain off of the triple chair to see where everyone was at, and then right up the tram, Lenin, Marx, Liberty Bowl, then Gullies 1, 2, and 3 before she suggested I might like to ski the Big.

 

I do, of course, incorporate any suggestions someone of her ilk makes, a practiced eye is usually an aid.  I just prefer spending my limited funds on food, beer, and gas for my car. Most instructors I ski with anymore, don't seem to feel the need to make suggestions, and I don't feel the need to seek suggestions.

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