EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Do I need some noodles?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Do I need some noodles?

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 

Yup, another "OMG, what ski should I get" thread.

 

I've started to think my current skis make me work harder than my aging body likes, particularly for quick turns in steep, tight terrain. At the same time I really like powerful and stable skis.

 

How much difference would a soft, playful ski (S3?) really make? Or will a softer, traditional design be a better compromise? Stiffer ski with tip rocker?

 

I am 6'1 and 165 lbs, currently ski:

Atomic Nomad Crimson 178

BRO 183 stiff

Dynastar Huge Trouble 185

Rossi B4 (in retirement)

 

post #2 of 29

If you like the more traditional feel from "chargers" I would'nt recommend the S3 (which you seem to do, judging from your quiver) since it's very jibby in both feel and handling.

 

 

If you want something easier but still with power and the stable feel I would look for skis that are more traditional but with shorter radius and tiprocker to compromise, just like you said.

 

First ski that came to my mind when I was reading was the Fatypus Dsender. Demoed it last winter in Revelstoke (184 cm), nice and stable feel while still energetic and poppy. Somewhere around 24m radius, which felt shorter, and tiprocker. A really easy going ski that still was burly enough to use on comps, playfull enough for just messing around, railed groomers and had pretty good float.

 

I'm 170 cm long, 65kg and I did'nt think it was too much ski, worth checking out.

post #3 of 29

atomic Atlas for you my friend!  Check out the 182.  You are a true expert skier- skiing serious lines.

post #4 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by kawo View Post

Yup, another "OMG, what ski should I get" thread.

 

I've started to think my current skis make me work harder than my aging body likes, particularly for quick turns in steep, tight terrain. At the same time I really like powerful and stable skis.

 

How much difference would a soft, playful ski (S3?) really make? Or will a softer, traditional design be a better compromise? Stiffer ski with tip rocker?

 

I am 6'1 and 165 lbs, currently ski:

Atomic Nomad Crimson 178

BRO 183 stiff

Dynastar Huge Trouble 185

Rossi B4 (in retirement)

 



what do you use the HT 185 for? I find that a playful ski for deep snow.

post #5 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarle View Post

If you like the more traditional feel from "chargers" I would'nt recommend the S3 (which you seem to do, judging from your quiver) since it's very jibby in both feel and handling.

 

First ski that came to my mind when I was reading was the Fatypus Dsender.

S3 would be the "antidote" to my quiver, kinda what I'm tempted but afraid to do.

 

Fatypus? haven't even thought of it.

post #6 of 29
Thread Starter 

I have mixed feelings about the HT. I really like it in crud, stable but still playful. Although going that fast through crud did a number to my shins. I struggled in deep snow, but at that point I was exhausted. Still, in tight spaces I felt the ski needed some effort and commitment.

 

I'll be holding on to the HT for now.

post #7 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post

atomic Atlas for you my friend!  Check out the 182.  You are a true expert skier- skiing serious lines.


Tempted to replace the HT with the Atlas (after skiing with Stephen) or with Katanas. But that would be another thread.

post #8 of 29

I'm almost your size (6', 165), also dealing with (very) aging body, have moved away from beefy skis as I've become a better skier. Yeah, I know, supposed to be the other way around. But I've discovered that sometimes the beef covered up weak technique; the ski was doing the work my mechanics should be doing. Also discovered that unless you can bend a ski, you're pretty much at its mercy. Not familiar with many of your skis, but a 183 Stiff Bro is serious work for a 165 lb-er. Assume you don't like to slow down.  

 

My big mountain/all mountain choices have gravitated from Stockli and Head toward two brands that have medium stiff flexes with unusual agreement between longitudinal and lateral flex: Kastle and Blizzard. Different feels, but both are strong without being tank-like, both are light enough in front to initiate quickly, and both have progressive, predictable tail energy. Which I value over pop. 

 

Don't agree about staying with power skis but going for shorter with more sidecut. That's a description of "wide carvers" which work really well in a narrow niche, but lack versatility. 

 

post #9 of 29

in keeping with Beyonds post, -Kawo, not sure of what width you are looking for but the Kastle mx88 or the new Kastle 94 Chris davenport would be two great ideas as well, (i was fortunate enough to snag a pair of last seasons' mx98's for $450)

 

So what width are you looking for? 

post #10 of 29

Personally, I find that the quality of the snow determines what type of flex I want in my skis, if it's soft snow, I like a softer ski because it requires less input to respond the way I want it to, but on harder snow I want a stiffer ski because it prevents the lost effort that occurs when the soft flex gives way to the hardness of the snow. I think a well balanced quiver has both stiffer and softer skis.

 

So if you don't have a noodle for the fluff, perhaps it would be a good addition.

post #11 of 29

OP: to switch out the HT for Katana would be the reverse of where you want to go.  Also, the HT was not made in a 175, but the Sixth Sense Huge, same ski, was, so a lot of people bought the HT a size to large, IMO. The 175 probably covers people from my size 135lb who ski a lot to people 160lb who don't get out quite as much. But that ship has left the dock, I follow.

post #12 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post
' mx98's for $450)

 

So what width are you looking for? 


How about flipping those MX?

 

Width is ultimately secondary, but would likely be 90-105 or so. I think it's more about the flex and camber to make the skis flow rather than bash.

 

 

post #13 of 29
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

switch out the HT for Katana would be the reverse of where you want to go.  Also, the HT was not made in a 175, but the Sixth Sense Huge, same ski, was, so a lot of people bought the HT a size to large, IMO.


You are right on both. The Katana was just a little thread drift. And yes, 175 would likely have be better, but...

post #14 of 29

FX94.......  calling Phil

 

I'll ignore the flipping suggestion.....

post #15 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:

Originally Posted by beyond View Post

Kastle and Blizzard.

 

I have been looking at those. Can't justify Kaestle price tag not having been on them.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by volantaddict View Post

So if you don't have a noodle for the fluff, perhaps it would be a good addition.


A real fluff noodle is not justified, unfortunately.

post #16 of 29

hmm, blizz' atlas... 

post #17 of 29

OP:

 

16 posts not counting this one, and I can't dechipher what you are looking for. You have four skis and (may) want something new.....(I think)

 

So............................

 

What job (conditions) do you want to address?

Which ski currently does that job?

How would you want the new ski to be better (or different) than the current one?

 

Or.............................

 

Do you want to ditch all four pr. that you have and start new?

If so; where do you ski, what conditions do you regularly encounter

What conditions do you prioritize?

ATEOOD.....how many skis do you want to own?

 

SJ

post #18 of 29
Thread Starter 


 

What job (conditions) do you want to address?

Which ski currently does that job?

How would you want the new ski to be better (or different) than the current one? 

Do you want to ditch all four pr. that you have and start new?

What conditions do you prioritize?

ATEOOD.....how many skis do you want to own?

I am looking for a ski that will require less effort (strength) to ski (turn) in tight, steep terrain. I ski about 30 days/year in Jackson Hole and Moonlight Basin. So, terrain would be Headwaters, chutes at JH. All my current skis will get some use, depending on the conditions. But I feel that my weight and strenght (or lack thereof) make them unnecessary difficult to ski in those conditions.

The new skis should be more playful, but still allow me to ski technical lines in control.

I can add to the quiver and later eliminate which ever ski seems redundant (the atomic crimson are trembling in fear). Considered starting from scratch, but I would rather redo the quiver slowly.

 

Hope this was a bit more clear.



 

post #19 of 29

 

 

Quote:
I've started to think my current skis make me work harder than my aging body likes,    (A)    particularly for quick turns in steep, tight terrain. At the same time   (B)  I really like powerful and stable skis.  

 

OK.......So a ski that fulfills (B) won't help you much with (A). So FWIW, I'll suggest you get over (B), dump the idea of stiff stable skis, and get on with something that'll help you with (A). There are literally dozens of skis that could do the job for you with varying degrees of light, nimble qualities.

 

Examples:

 

Rossi S3 = Very high on the fun, playful, maneuverable side.

Dynastar Slicer = A little more serious and stable.

Dynastar Sultan 94 = Firmer than either of the above but still not close to hard work.

 

The Blizzard "One", Line P90, are two other great choices.

 

SJ

post #20 of 29

" quick turns for steep and tight trees" Why not get a shorter ski? You don't weigh very much yet most of your skis are 180+

post #21 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by craigr View Post

" quick turns for steep and tight trees" Why not get a shorter ski? You don't weigh very much yet most of your skis are 180+



I think it's more about flexpattern and shape rather than length. I'm 20lbs lighter than Kawo, used to ride 190 and 200+ before I got more into flippyspinny stuff, now my skis are from 181 to 186.

A Hellbent 189 (which measures around 193) is def easier to ski than ie Head M103 183 smile.gif

post #22 of 29

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by craigr View Post

" quick turns for steep and tight trees" Why not get a shorter ski? You don't weigh very much yet most of your skis are 180+

 

FacePalm.jpg

post #23 of 29
Thread Starter 

SJ,

 

rather than jumping to a specific model, I am trying to figure out where on the spectrum of stable vs. jibby the ski should fall.

 

How much of a compromise on control is a ski like the S3?

 

From your experience, how much does the feel of the same (stiff) ski change with different length? Assuming the build does not change with length. Say 6th Sense Huge 175 vs 185? BRO 183/179?

post #24 of 29


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by kawo View Post

SJ,

 

rather than jumping to a specific model, I am trying to figure out where on the spectrum of stable vs. jibby the ski should fall.

 

How much of a compromise on control is a ski like the S3?

 

From your experience, how much does the feel of the same (stiff) ski change with different length? Assuming the build does not change with length. Say 6th Sense Huge 175 vs 185? BRO 183/179?



You will have more control with an S3 but less stability. That is the tradeoff. How much an HT changes from 175-185 is dependant upon the skiers' perception. I owned an HT in 185. All my skis in that category fall into that length range. However, when I skied the 175, I was pleasantly surprised. That particular ski works quite well in the shorter size. It was a little less stable in heavier crud and bucked me around a little more but but not bad. This is one of those questions like "how much will I like it?"......no way to know.

 

SJ

post #25 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SierraJim View Post

You will have more control with an S3 but less stability. 

This may be the answer. What other ski would fall into that category?

 

post #26 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by kawo View Post



This may be the answer. What other ski would fall into that category?

 



The other four that I listed previously.

 

SJ

post #27 of 29



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by kawo View Post


 

I am looking for a ski that will require less effort (strength) to ski (turn) in tight, steep terrain. I ski about 30 days/year in Jackson Hole and Moonlight Basin. So, terrain would be Headwaters, chutes at JH. All my current skis will get some use, depending on the conditions. But I feel that my weight and strenght (or lack thereof) make them unnecessary difficult to ski in those conditions.

The new skis should be more playful, but still allow me to ski technical lines in control.

I can add to the quiver and later eliminate which ever ski seems redundant (the atomic crimson are trembling in fear). Considered starting from scratch, but I would rather redo the quiver slowly.

 

Hope this was a bit more clear.



 

 

Although there are multiple skis that would fit this, one is just screaming to me:  DPS Wailer 95s.  They have early rise tips and are really intuitive and easy to ski, but are quite stiff and are absolutely solid on steep snow and fast lines.  I bought a pair of the pure carbons for a screamin deal this summer and have been using them with Dynafits for a summer skiing rig in Wyoming and Montana, and I am to the point that I doubt I will ever take a different pair of skis on a summer trip again (or a winter mountaineering trip for that matter), unless I am just set on making tele turns.  Although they are expensive, I think you would be hard pressed to find something better for what you want. 

 

Here are a few videos of them at work on the same 35-50 degree couloir several weeks apart on very different snow consistencies:

 

http://vimeo.com/13838703 

 

http://vimeo.com/14379491 

 

post #28 of 29

Some great skiing on that pristine blower.... especially on the second video!  Nice job..  

post #29 of 29
Thread Starter 

Mmmmmm....sun cups. Were you wearing a tooth guard?

 

Finndog, did you get the S3? I read you were contemplating it.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Do I need some noodles?