or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › New boots for advanced skier
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

New boots for advanced skier

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

I'm looking for a new pair of boots for the upcoming season. I've just been using some cheap Salomons over the last two years and would like to get something more performance oriented. I guess I would classify myself as an advanced skier. I ski about 20% on piste blues/double blues, 20% on piste blacks, and 60% off-piste blacks/double-blacks/trees. My skis are Watea 94s with Tyrolia Peak 15 bindings. Fischer's website recommends their Soma X-110 boots which look pretty nice and sound great. Unfortunately they're new for this season and are probably not worth the extra money over a smiliar boot. Does anyone have any recommendations for something similar or maybe even something completely different? Price is not a huge deal, but I would like to be able to get some from last year or the year before so they are not so expensive. My size is between 27-29 I believe and I think the right flexibility for me would be somewhere between 90-120. Thanks for the help!

post #2 of 17
Thread Starter 

*I'm 18, 145 lbs, 5'8"

post #3 of 17

I would refrain from purchasing boots online. You can get lucky but you probably won't. At minimum, go into a shop and have them size you up and give you a shell fit. At best, you also want to get decent footbeds and take care of any adjustments that need to be made.

post #4 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by MojoMan View Post

I would refrain from purchasing boots online. You can get lucky but you probably won't. At minimum, go into a shop and have them size you up and give you a shell fit. At best, you also want to get decent footbeds and take care of any adjustments that need to be made.


This, but don't even think for one minute that is OK to have a shop size up and then buy on-line. At the very least be honest about what you are doing and pay for the time you spend with the shop. It is a pretty low move to use the service of a shop with no intention of buying from them. If money is not a big deal, find a boot fitter and work with them. Proper fitting boots are the single most important piece of gear you can buy.

post #5 of 17

Fit is so much more important than brand.  Go to a shop and start with the brand that fits your foot the best.  I personally dont believe that custome fitting is always necessary, but then again I've never had it done so maybe I dont know what I'm missing.  I see no problem in going to a shop and finding the right boot and then saying something like - I'd really like to buy it here but I can get it online for __ can you come close to that.  I'm sure the shops know what theboots are going for online.

post #6 of 17

Definantly get a shell fit, i didnt and i have to duct tape my feet to keep nasty blisters from building up. If you feel any points pressuring your foot wrong in the shell dont buy them, also remember that liners pack out quite a bit, so buy tight. I tried on a pair of dalbello kryptons in a shop and they fit perfect, when you find the right boot you will know that its right.

post #7 of 17

If you have no idea of the type of boot that works for your foot I definitely recommend going into a store. However, one thing you can do online is buy 2 or 3 pairs of boots and try them all on. Return the ones that don't fit (you will pay shipping in some cases).

post #8 of 17

Levelnine has some great deals on the Fisher Soma boots, if you can get the correct shell size you can pay a boot fitter for their time to work on it. BUT don't get the boot just because it says that's the best one to go with the skis! I have the Soma (MX PRo 95) and it works really well for me, I have almost flat feet and quite skinny ankles if that's any help. My feet are 267 and 265 mm long and I have the 26.5 (302mm) shell. I did buy them from a local boot fitter who also did some work on them but they're $300 cheaper from L9 so if I had to replace them that's what I'd do...


Edited by lj269 - 10/6/10 at 11:27am
post #9 of 17

 

The tough part about buying boots, and the reason to spend the extra money on a good boot fitter, is that most people know what feels comfortable when they try them on, but have no clue whether or not it's really the right size, much less, height, stiffness, etc. My current boots are a full size smaller than anything I would have ever bought on my own. They weren't especially comfortable when I first tried them on, but with a little stretching of the liners and a tiny punch out near my right big toe, they're perfect. Of course, if not for the fitter, I would have never known that.

 

Yes, there are low end boots and high end boots, but at the end of the day, boot performance is more about fit than anything else.

post #10 of 17

Find a good boot fitter who will size up your feet and put you in the proper fitting boot and make adjustments to the boot to make it fit better.  Find said boot fitter in a location you can return to for adjustments after skiing the fitted boots.  You should not have your feet moving around in your boots, and you should not need to worry about loosing your toes to frostbite because the boots are too tight.  You should be able to ski in full control without pain in your feet. Boots will take a little use before the break in, so final fitting will be required; too much adjustment before they break in will leave some spots too loose.  Everybody's tolerance is different, so the bootfitter may have a hard time believing you when you tell him the boot is too tight.  It's still better to go back several times for incremental adjustments than to overdo it.  If the boot fitter is 100 miles away, it's a big inconvenience to get it right.

post #11 of 17
Thread Starter 

Thanks guys I definitely won't buy without trying some on and if I end up buying online I'll at least pay for the time in the shop. The deals online are too good to pass up most of the time so unless a store will match it, I'll just pay them for the help with fitting.

Thanks a lot lj269 I'll definitely check out levelnines selection.

In your guys opinion is it worth the extra money to take my boots to surefoot or something and get custom fitting? I have pretty normal feet (size, arch, width, etc) and comfort has never been a problem for me.

post #12 of 17

The problem with simply trying on a few pairs is that what you think is a good fit will most likely differ from what a competent boot fitter will say is a good fit.  A good fit is as much about the actual fit of the boot as it is to your stance, skiing ability, etc.  It is highly unlikely that you will be lucky enough to find the perfect boot for your foot and skiing style.  It is my opinion that all boots/skiers need a good boot fitting, at least that has been the advice given to me by coaches and skiers whose ability far exceeds mine and whose judgments I respect. Your boots are the interface from your body to the ski and as said above, your boots are singlehandedly the most important piece of equipment you will buy and and will be the difference maker in enhancing your skiing ability.  There are many good bootfitters on epicski.  You can also check out www.bootfitters.com, they have a few in the SLC and Park City area.  It will not be a waste of $$$.     

post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sean Stratford-Jones View Post

My skis are Watea 94s with Tyrolia Peak 15 bindings.


Well, you have Fischer skis, so the Fischer boot is a no-brainer... but Tyrolia bindings, Tyrolia is owned by Head, who also make boots. Maybe you should check out some Head boots to go with the bindings? 

 

You mention being between a 27 and 29, so just buy some 28.5's, the 1/2 size will be more comfortable with the same boot length. 

 

Maybe level9 will ship you some Fischer and some Head boots and you can see which fit into your bindings best?

 

Just a few thoughts.

post #14 of 17

OK, so you get lucky and pick the right boot, then go see a boot fitter. Depending on the work involved, expect to pay another $100 to $200, more if you need custom footbeds (there's a school of thought that everyone needs them, but I can't speak to that). A good chunk of that is included in the price when you but from the fitter. Odds are, when all is said and done, you won't have saved much.

 

More than likely though, you'll pick the wrong boot. If you can't return them, most boot fitters I know are good guys and will try their best to make things better (for the same $100 to $200), but no matter what they do, after 20 or 30 days, the liners will have packed out, your feet/ankles/shins will hurt after a couple of runs, and you will once again be in the market for new boots. I guess that's fine if you only ski 4 or 5 days a year, but if you're a halfway serious skier, those boots aren't lasting 2 seasons (I get between 80 and 100 days out of my boots). And you're saving how much buying them online?

post #15 of 17


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tyson Rockwood View Post




Well, you have Fischer skis, so the Fischer boot is a no-brainer... but Tyrolia bindings, Tyrolia is owned by Head, who also make boots. Maybe you should check out some Head boots to go with the bindings? 

 

You mention being between a 27 and 29, so just buy some 28.5's, the 1/2 size will be more comfortable with the same boot length. 

 

Maybe level9 will ship you some Fischer and some Head boots and you can see which fit into your bindings best?

 

Just a few thoughts.


Tell me you're just pulling this guys chain with these "recommendations". Please.

 

Fischer skis so Fischer boots is a no brainer? No brainer is the thought process.

 

Between 27 and 29 so "just get a 28.5". Unfreaking believeable.

post #16 of 17

I am as cheap as they come.  But I would never buy boots online or from someone who pulls something off the shelf and says "this is the best boot" or ""Fischer boots go with Fischer skis".  Expertise is worth money, and expertise is what anyone who is serious about their skiing needs when they buy boots.  Boots fit differently, have different characteristics about what can and can't be done to them, have different flexes (no, a 100 flex from one company is not necessarily the same 100 as from another), and have different adjustments.  Skis are easy: pick a performance category, try one or five, and decide what you like.  Boots are WAYYYY more complicated.  As garylk says, what you consider to be a good fit is not necessarily what a good fitter will consider a good fit.

 

Think about how much you spend on tickets in a season.  Compared to this, the difference b/w online purchase and a shop purchase is small.  Do you really want to throw away a good part of the experience (skiing to your potential) by saving $200?

 

Listen to the advice most of us are giving you here.  Find a really good shop (ask around a lot).  Find a good fitter.  Demand that someone consider what kind of skiing you do, how good a skier you are, and what you want from a new boot.  Get a shell fitting at the very minimum. Ask if the fitter can explain why one boot is better for your foot than another.  Try them on and when you find one that is close, wear them around the shop for 30 minutes minimum.  Listen if the fitter suggests some adjustments. Pay whatever it costs.  You will have these boots for a long time -- saving money in the end.


Edited by tch - 10/11/10 at 6:54pm
post #17 of 17
Thread Starter 



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by snofun3 View Post


 


Tell me you're just pulling this guys chain with these "recommendations". Please.

 

Fischer skis so Fischer boots is a no brainer? No brainer is the thought process.

 

Between 27 and 29 so "just get a 28.5". Unfreaking believeable.



Just to make it clear so I don't look like an idiot: no I didn't take that guy's advice seriously (and I'm hoping he didn't either). I only looked at and mentioned the Fischer boots because I just did a quick look at their website to see what they recommend, and that's basically been the extent of my research so far. And the size range was just because my boots are not with me at the moment and I forgot what size I wear.

I'm going to need to research boots a lot more, and at the very least I will try on boots before I buy them if I don't hire a professional boot fitter. To be clear, I'm not planning on just blindly buying boots online. Thanks again for the help.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › New boots for advanced skier