EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ask the Boot Guys › Is this issue something that can be helped via boot fitter?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Is this issue something that can be helped via boot fitter?

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

I have been critiqued as skiing slightly in the backseat and asked to get my hips more forward which is difficult for me.  So I was wondering if the struggle I have could be caused by a limitation in my feet.

 

I have some restricted range of motion in one of my ankles due to an old injury.  I also have high arches and so when standing throughout the day I notice that it feels like alot of my weight is naturally on my heels causing heel pain.

 

I already have custom footbeds.  Is there a boot fitting cure that can help this and if so what direction should I go first?

 

Thanks

post #2 of 12

odds are your boots are actually pitching you too far forward, so you lean back to correct so you are in the back seat.   boot might be too soft/stiff  too?

 

This is assuming that your boots are not 2 sizes too big (as a lot of peoples are anyways)

 

best to see a good fitter, with some stance and alignment skills, and see what small changes work on the snow for you.

post #3 of 12

carnac the impossible sezs: your problem is not likely outside the boot, it is inside your boot and involves your ankles range of motion, arch flexibility, and your boot is at least 1 size too big.

 

jim

 

post #4 of 12
Thread Starter 

I went to two different bootfitters before getting my current boots and both fit me in similar bsl boots, just different models.  So I am confident with the size.  They both were also ok with my custom footbeds, but nothing was done related to stance and alignment.  Which is why I asked the question.  I was hoping that it might be something that could be fixed inside the boots and was hoping to understand what sequence a reputable bootfitter would take.  That way I would have some understanding of the process and if the bootfitter I was working with was on the right path.

post #5 of 12

Not being able to stay forward can be caused by many different things and there is some disagreement on them, even among us.  But I would say what I see typically is too much boot and/or binding ramp angle as mtnlion said, or bindings too far back.

 

Lou

post #6 of 12
Thread Starter 

So it seems like it is counterintuitive in regards to ramp angle.  I've read that increasing ramp angle causes the knees to move forward, so that would make me think that would help one keep their weight forward, just like placing a 2X4 under your heels make balance doing squats easier.

BUT it appears from the above comments that the opposite is true.

post #7 of 12

you have to add up the boot ramp and the binding delta, you get to a point where the body says "too much" and then reacts (ends up back)

 

get ye to a good fitter and all will be well

post #8 of 12

For years it has been advertised that increasing ramp helps skiers stay forward.  Jeanie Thoren has made a career of it.  How I don't know.  I just had a friend and Canadian National Team member in a few weeks ago for some work.  His binding delta is zero and his boot ramp is 2.5 degrees.  Probably your boot ramp is  close to 5 and your bindings are 1-2.  In my experience nearly everyone prefers flatter than their equipment comes from the manufacturers. 

 

Experimenting is easy without making permanent changes.  try it yourself.

 

Lou

post #9 of 12

stance and alignment are not independent of boot fitting. everyone, yes everyone thinks that they are. 

 

the process as a whole includes measuring and shell sizing the foot, assessment of your ankle joint range of motion, arch flexibility, and any forefoot alignment issues, underfoot solution to match the previous assessments, cuff alignment, and finally sole cant.

 

based on your original questions from post #1.....

 

"So I was wondering if the struggle I have could be caused by a limitation in my feet?"

 

the answer to your first question is yes. now based on the follow up info that you have provided the solution definitely has something to do with your next statement, "I have some restricted range of motion in one of my ankles due to an old injury.  I also have high arches and so when standing throughout the day I notice that it feels like a lot of my weight is naturally on my heels causing heel pain."

 

now to your second question......

 

"I already have custom footbeds.  Is there a boot fitting cure that can help this and if so what direction should I go first?"

 

couple of points: first of all the process as a whole includes measuring and shell sizing the foot, assessment of your ankle joint range of motion, arch flexibility, and any forefoot alignment issues, underfoot solution to match the previous assessments, cuff alignment, and finally sole cant.

 

using your description of what is going on, the 2 most obvious places to take the closest look is closest to your foot. you say you have a footbed and that the footbed was deemed ok, i would start my sleuthing right there. based on ankle issues and arch issues i am suspicious of your footbed. as far as internal ramp and forward lean are concerned, your arch flexibity is the next important clue to getting things correct inside the boot. and related to that and in line with having balance issues, i think that you are in a boot that is too big, or not the correct match to your foots shape.

 

now on to the big question...."Is this issue something that can be helped via boot fitter?" the down and dirty easy answer is yes, however it will not happen if you go back to the last two guys you queried about you footbed and shell sizing. you need to find a guy that knows what kind of footbed to build for your foot structure and get you into a proper fitting and flexing boot for your unique set of circumstances. you haven't offered up where you are located, so until we know we cannot steer you towards the right boot fitter.

 

jim
 

post #10 of 12
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the good information.

 

Jim, I am located in Broomfield, CO.

post #11 of 12

Greg Hoffman  in Vail he has the skill set to figure out your situation.

 

contact him @ http://www.skibootfitting.com/

 

jim

post #12 of 12
Thread Starter 

Thanks.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ask the Boot Guys
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ask the Boot Guys › Is this issue something that can be helped via boot fitter?