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Do you have a 'One Tip' wonder?

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 

I have an exercise I use with all my advanced beginner/intermediate skiers and it's the single biggest exercise for seeing large improvement. I call it the 'Grunting' exercise. All they have to do is grunt or make a loud noise towards the end of their turn. I don't explain why or what it's supposed to do at first. I love it as you literally can't get it wrong and nearly everyone improves.

Do you have a simple 'fix it all' exercise you commonly use?

You've probably figured out that my exercise helps them use their core muscles without realizing it, so whey they finish the turn they're more centered on their skis, there's less 'arm flapping' and other signs of an unbalanced skier.

There's very few skeirs of this level who couldn't do with a more balanced finish to their turn.

post #2 of 22

Great topic skiingaround. And grate tip. I will try that the upcomming winter .

 

I too have an exercise I use with all my advanced beginner/intermediate skiers. I always start off my lessons with a simple warm up drill on the flats where we windmill with our arms and move our weight forward and aft and side ways and stand on one ski and slip and slide and walk and climb and squatt and extend etc. The students dont know it but they are learning basic skiing skills in a playfull manner. And they get warmed up at the same time which is important for good safe performance. Its also a very good way of checking out your students athletic abilities and how devoted they are. Every time I skip this warmup drill I end up regretting it later.

post #3 of 22

If I had to choose, I would say my "One Tip wonder" drill has been the outside pole drag.  It is the drill that has made the most marked difference in realizing the advantages of counter balance & using angulation in big, round, carved turns.  In a lot of cases it is the first time some skiers realize that they are turning their skis with their feet & legs, not with their hips & shoulders.

JF

 

BTW, what is an advanced beginner/intermediate ?

post #4 of 22

I used to do something similar with the little ones(ages 5-8).  I'd poll the group and let each kid talk about their favorite animal.  Then I'd have then growl or grunt or bark like that animal when they were finishing their turns or pressing their wedge to control speed depending on what their level was at the time.

post #5 of 22

I don't have a one tip wonder. I'm in the camp that says different students have different needs. If you're using one tip too often, you're teaching a tip and not the student.

 

I've often taught what I call "grrrr" turns to lower intermediates who need to learn how to create higher edge angles for use with steering as opposed to only using edge angle control for braking. This is similar enough to the grunting that I believe our end goal is the same.

 

I've also been using a lot of carved traverse exercises for upper level intermediates, but I use a lot of variations depending on student needs and conditions du jour.

post #6 of 22

Two tips for the price of one - these two have garnered more "I'll be darned that's a good one," as well as "I sure got a lot of mileage out of that one thing you told me two seasons ago," comments.

 

One is the old Harb stance ski/phantom ski thing to (among a whole raft of other things) coax people out of the throw-em-sideways-skid method of turning their skis.  Folks who are ready for it love it.  I am careful to introduce it on terrain a couple notches down from their comfort level.

 

The other is what I call "if you're going to use one finger..." exercise.  I'll use it in the middle of session dedicated to pole use.  There's always at least one person who is rendering their pole swing absolutely useless by gripping the pole with thumb and forefinger only.  I tell them, "if you are going to use one finger to grip your pole, use this one," (demonstrate using pinky only).  "That way, when you swing your pole, your body goes with it, which is the whole point."  I usually follow up with, "one of the best skiers I know has no arms.  There is nothing magical about your poles - it is what they remind you to do with your body that counts."

post #7 of 22

Aim your bellybutton where you want to go.

post #8 of 22

I love the pointing your belly button where you want to go tip Kneale!  Turn your head in the direction you want to go usually works pretty well for me too.! 

 

Are you ready for some snow!!!!!  

post #9 of 22
Thread Starter 

Ok, here's an odd tip which I've seen used by some very top trainers. "Pretend" you've got a huge and heavy schlong and when you extend vertically it forces you to extend along the length of the ski.

This was used to stop those in the group that tipped their head and upper body in the direction of the turn they want to go. Always got a giggle, especially from the girls in the group.

post #10 of 22

At some ski areas, skiingaround, the "Huge Schlong" exercise could get you fired. More importantly, I don't understand the purpose. Could you explain?

 

I don't get the grunting deal either, unless you're trying to get the skiers to make gross sounds and gross movements. What's the desired outcome of that exercise?

 

I'm with Rusty, a good tip takes advantage of a teaching opportunity--planned or canned tips probably lack the critical feature of being super relevant for the situation of the moment.

post #11 of 22
Thread Starter 

Ok Nolo, make a loud noise, now feel which muscles tensed when you did that. Your abdomen/core muscles tense. Now, what is the most common mistake in beginner and intermediate skiing.... fore/aft balance, usually aft.

Imagine this, a skier starts his first turn ok, but finished the turn on the back, he now starts his next turn off balance, and problems accumulate. By finishing the turn well, ie centered instead of on the back foot, you make the next turn better. We all know how important the transition is!

Also, I'm all for client catered exercises, but try and understand I'm using a real simple exercise to address a very simple and very common problem. Am surprised you don't get it.

post #12 of 22

Okay. I'll buy that. 

 

How about the other one--can you explain how extending vertically along the length of the ski would benefit a skier who dips their inside half in the direction of the turn?

 

post #13 of 22

Oddly enough I see a similarity between skiingaround's grunting and my grr turns. Grr turns are trying to get intermediate skiers who are just riding their skis to make movements to store energy into their skis and get the feedback when the skis release that energy. Grunting could work similar to the grunts that tennis players make to increase the power of their swings. The idea here is to get the skiers to put extra effort into their turns that isn't "needed" but can be "used".

post #14 of 22

Two 'tips' I like...1) Focus on enjoyment in skiing. Most people when arriving at a lesson especially high end, think too much, forget to relax and let the skills come naturally and try to force it.

 

                        2) I really like double pole drag sometimes with straps only so the client isn't grabbing hold for dear life (works well with older ladies) seems to give good results 9 out of 10 times.

 

post #15 of 22
Thread Starter 

Ok Nolo, now let me explain the extending along the length of the ski. Think about this, if you tilt/tip the top half of the body  at the start of the turn, ie you extend, but instead of extending straight up you tip to the left or right depending on the turn, then you're initiating the turn with your upper body. The purpose of getting people to extend straight up, is they then have to focus on turning with their legs first and not tipping into the turn with the upper body.

I used to 'tip' with my head leading the turn, it was such a small motion, but then my coaches videoed me and I could see exactly what they meant. I stopped that 'tipping' with my head at the start of a turn. By stopping that and extending vertically and not 'tipping' my skiing improved a lot.

 

Oh, and Rollo, I almost always end up using a double pole drag at some stage. It's the sort of exerecise that automatically puts you in the correct skiing position and automatically changes your stance to suit the gradient you are on.

post #16 of 22

testing with the new firefox 3.6

Unknown Object

 

nope - still busted

post #17 of 22
Quote:

Originally Posted by rollo87 

  2) I really like double pole drag sometimes with straps only so the client isn't grabbing hold for dear life (works well with older ladies) seems to give good results 9 out of 10 times.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by skiingaround View Post

Oh, and Rollo, I almost always end up using a double pole drag at some stage. It's the sort of exerecise that automatically puts you in the correct skiing position and automatically changes your stance to suit the gradient you are on.


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by nolo View Post

 

I'm with Rusty, a good tip takes advantage of a teaching opportunity--planned or canned tips probably lack the critical feature of being super relevant for the situation of the moment.


Agree with both Nolo & Rusty,  just throwing an exercise or drill out there can be meaningless if it doesn't fit the students needs. 

 

A drill like the pole drag can be adapted to many levels & many situations.  It is knowing how to use it for the student to gain the desired outcome.  I actually thought I invented this drill yrs, ago, but then came to find that there are many parallel universes .  I chose it as my favorite, as I almost always find that I get great tangible results from it & have created a lot of "AH HA" moments with it.

 

JF

post #18 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRusty View Post

testing with the new firefox 3.6

 

nope - still busted

 

So it's not just me?  I was trying to embed a video the other night, tried this way & that, started pulling my hair out, ran to my other computer with explorer & no problem.

JF

post #19 of 22

There's a discussion about video embedding and Firefox here:

Quote:

In Firefox 3.6.9, the Firefox developers made an unannounced and significant change to the way that the browser handles certain types of objects that created issues for many rich text editors across the web, including the one that we use at Huddler.  You can read more about the bug here (it's pretty in-depth technical stuff though): https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=596300

 

The end result is that users who are using Firefox 3.6.9 and 3.6.10 (the two latest versions) are unable to upload videos (both YouTube and Vimeo) and file attachments on the Huddler platform.  The Firefox developers have acknowledged the problem and have incorporated a fix for it in the next Firefox release (3.6.11), which is currently scheduled to be released on October 14th.  Until the new version of Firefox is released, users who are having trouble inserting videos and attachments should use an alternative browser such as Chrome or Safari.

post #20 of 22

One Tip Wonder:

1. A sound byte style of introducing a concept, usually followed up with more details as the group explores the concept.

2. A mythical magic pill solution that will solve everyone's problems

3. A sign of a new instructor looking for more tricks for their bag, usually results in that instructor overusing that new idea for at least a season

4. Literally looking down and noticing you only have one ski and thus one tip, so you're wondering where the other one is. Usually followed by uttering the word DANG.

 

My favorite is the second one. You'll find it in isle 13 next to the unicorn food.

DD/JASP

KSRS

post #21 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4ster View Post

 

So it's not just me?  I was trying to embed a video the other night, tried this way & that, started pulling my hair out, ran to my other computer with explorer & no problem.

JF



oops posted in the wrong thread..... In that other thread I made a post earlier about how Firefox users could work around the problem.

post #22 of 22

Haha, made my day. I like number 4.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by justanotherskipro View Post

One Tip Wonder:

1. A sound byte style of introducing a concept, usually followed up with more details as the group explores the concept.

2. A mythical magic pill solution that will solve everyone's problems

3. A sign of a new instructor looking for more tricks for their bag, usually results in that instructor overusing that new idea for at least a season

4. Literally looking down and noticing you only have one ski and thus one tip, so you're wondering where the other one is. Usually followed by uttering the word DANG.

 

My favorite is the second one. You'll find it in isle 13 next to the unicorn food.

DD/JASP

KSRS

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