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How to ski Powder? Please Post your tips and suggestions! - Page 9

post #241 of 267

If a few skiers make a photo to demonstate perfect form, they will likely co-ordinate the effort of skier and photographer to produce that perfect turn.

 

Also, if skiers make a photo to show a skier handling very difficult terrain well, steep and narrow for example, the photo will likely show a perfect turn because that is the only type of turn that will be solid and safe for that moment in that place in those conditions.

 

Lastly, if skiers make a  photo of skiin' around, havin' fun, letting it rock and roll any way it feels good on easy to moderate terrain, then the photo may show a turn that has technical flaws which in the moment shown were a lot of fun,  like rotation, banking, launching an airborne pivot, laying back and wheely-ing, whatever strikes ones fancy and makes you smile.

 

While one has to know how to make a solid, strong, (perfect?) turn for when the situation demands it, there are many fun turns to make when the situation allows it. IMO.

 

(the skier shown is enjoying himself, completely relaxed on moderate terrain, not modeling for technical review or shredding the gnar, I'd say) 

post #242 of 267

Hi to all,

 

I think - powder skiing is like some kind of ART I would call ! Becaause as davluri said...if one makes perfect..others look like clouns :) And that depends on lot of things I gues..

 

There are certain rules I gues : like sit on your hills, control weight..keep tips up, swing as beatifull as you can :) Jums and sing :) If there'are high hills..dangerous terrains..you have to bee phisicaly and emotionaly ready and concentrated. Move weightght on the front..I gues ? to press tips and control..

 

Bute rest of the time just float on  powder :) Have a can of beer, kiss a blond girl and enjoy life !!!

 

Hi to all :)

post #243 of 267

did I say that, really? just kidding.

 

you are talking about a lot of things there. powder skiing is still basic skiing, with some small differences.

 

try to think about one small technical point at a time.

 

good luck, sounds like you will be having fun. though a special powder lesson could be very good.

post #244 of 267
Thread Starter 

New technology is there and available to assist beginners to learn faster and help them become good skiiers, why not utilize it?? I had no idea on what to do in powder and my narrow skis were dramatically sinking in, I didn't enjoy the "back seat" position as it didn't feel natural. Skiing on rocker Goats have changed the entire experience in one day. After one season of skiing on my goats, I had a powder day on my narrow skis... I was able to ski just fine since I was comfortable in the the deep snow, however, once again I didn't enjoy it as much. 
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post

Good skiing is good skiing, on a groomer, in powder, in crud, in bumps, etc... There are is no special technique for powder skiing (with or without fat / rockered skis).  If you are  a "good skier" and you still get worked skiing powder this indicates that you have some underlying weak spot in your technique. You can be good at somethings and still weak in other areas. Buying a turn with fat rockers will probably help, but ultimately does not address the underlying problem.

 

A powder day is a great time to take a lesson to work on powder tactics. But its a horrible time do drills and other skill building work when you really just want to go ski the fun lines and soft snow.

 

It is not easy to admit that you need to improve when you think you are a good skier and it will take time. Find a coach at your home mountain, take a series of lessons, or do a week long clinic (ESA, etc...) Work on fixing the weak spots in your technique whatever those may be. Work to develop good well balanced and efficient technique that works everyday, in all conditions. And then when you hit a powder day you will be prepared to rip it.

 

$.02

 

 



 

post #245 of 267

Remember when you were a kid and you put your arm out the window of a moving car? You discovered that when you turned your hand a bit, the wind catches it and makes some G force. Do the same thing from the waste down.

post #246 of 267
Quote:
Originally Posted by Artemat View Post

New technology is there and available to assist beginners to learn faster and help them become good skiiers, why not utilize it?? I had no idea on what to do in powder and my narrow skis were dramatically sinking in, I didn't enjoy the "back seat" position as it didn't feel natural. Skiing on rocker Goats have changed the entire experience in one day. After one season of skiing on my goats, I had a powder day on my narrow skis... I was able to ski just fine since I was comfortable in the the deep snow, however, once again I didn't enjoy it as much. 
 

 

Fatter skis with rocker ski better in soft deep or 3d snow conditions compared to skinnier, conventional skis. That's a fact. If a person is struggling in powder on skinny skis they can probably "buy a turn" in powder with new equipment.

 

However,no ski can teach you anything or make you a better skier.  What they do is make is make powder and 3d snow more accessible and once people have access they are can continue to learn as they go.

post #247 of 267
Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post

 

However,no ski can teach you anything or make you a better skier.  What they do is make is make powder and 3d snow more accessible and once people have access they are can continue to learn as they go.



There is some truth in this.

 

However, it is worth noting, yet again, that skis span a design spectrum. The design of conventional skis is optimized for firm snow. That design makes them weak performers in soft snow. In contrast, the design of modern rockered skis makes them substantially more at home in soft snow. Even snow that is not "3D". This is embedded in the design characteristics of the skis and there is no escaping it.

 

This has a profound impact on technique. While you can make a case that the "basics" of balance are the same (or at least substantially similar), the fact is that skiing soft snow on conventional skis requires you to develop technique whose mission is to defeat the most basic design characteristics of the ski. Whereas skiing soft snow well on modern rockered skis centers on developing technique that takes advantage of the core design characteristics of the ski.

 

The moral of the story: if you are a powder newb, get yourself on a well designed pair of skis that has tip + tail rocker and is at least 100 underfoot - and that is a minimum. That way you will be spend your time learning to ski powder rather than to undo the essence of your firm snow oriented ski.

 

 

post #248 of 267
Quote:
Originally Posted by spindrift View Post

This has a profound impact on technique. While you can make a case that the "basics" of balance are the same (or at least substantially similar), the fact is that skiing soft snow on conventional skis requires you to develop technique whose mission is to defeat the most basic design characteristics of the ski. Whereas skiing soft snow well on modern rockered skis centers on developing technique that takes advantage of the core design characteristics of the ski.

 

The moral of the story: if you are a powder newb, get yourself on a well designed pair of skis that has tip + tail rocker and is at least 100 underfoot - and that is a minimum. That way you will be spend your time learning to ski powder rather than to undo the essence of your firm snow oriented ski.

 

 

 

rolleyes.gif

 


Edited by volantaddict - 9/25/11 at 10:36pm
post #249 of 267

While I haven't read through this thread, my suggestion is this. If you're not an experienced powderhound, about 5'10", weighing in around 170, skiing Volkls or K2s in about a 175 on old Nordica boots, redheaded (this is crucial), with a few days' stubble, rocking substantial amounts of duct or Gorilla tape on your gloves and/or pants, wearing an Arcteryx or Marmot jacket and carrying a shit-eating grin on your face, you should stay clear of any powder, for your own safety. You should IMMEDIATELY post whereabouts of said powder via text, email, Facebook, Twitter or PM to the Powder-Disposal Squad and we will defuse the situation for you.

post #250 of 267
Thread Starter 

Good point.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by spindrift View Post

This has a profound impact on technique. While you can make a case that the "basics" of balance are the same (or at least substantially similar), the fact is that skiing soft snow on conventional skis requires you to develop technique whose mission is to defeat the most basic design characteristics of the ski. Whereas skiing soft snow well on modern rockered skis centers on developing technique that takes advantage of the core design characteristics of the ski.

 

The moral of the story: if you are a powder newb, get yourself on a well designed pair of skis that has tip + tail rocker and is at least 100 underfoot - and that is a minimum. That way you will be spend your time learning to ski powder rather than to undo the essence of your firm snow oriented ski.

 

 

 

rolleyes.gif

post #251 of 267
Thread Starter 

Being rather new to the sport, (5 years - 50 -60 days per year), I've learned one thing. THE things is, when you are on the ski hill and you want to know where all the cool and secrets spots are, religiously follow the individual described bellow. Several things might happen there: 1. He will lead you to a secret powder stash. 2. He will lead you to a freaking double expert steep glade where you will test your skills (and find a good snow). 3 He will notice you are following him, and he will just ski down a blue run trying to leave you in his dust... 0h, and #4, he might ski into some trees where him and his friends stashed some beer, noticing you are there, they might offer you some, take the beer, make friends, and buy next round at the lodge!! >>>>>>>>>>>>>..........:-) :-) 

Quote:
Originally Posted by prickly View Post

While I haven't read through this thread, my suggestion is this. If you're not an experienced powderhound, about 5'10", weighing in around 170, skiing Volkls or K2s in about a 175 on old Nordica boots, redheaded (this is crucial), with a few days' stubble, rocking substantial amounts of duct or Gorilla tape on your gloves and/or pants, wearing an Arcteryx or Marmot jacket and carrying a shit-eating grin on your face, you should stay clear of any powder, for your own safety. You should IMMEDIATELY post whereabouts of said powder via text, email, Facebook, Twitter or PM to the Powder-Disposal Squad and we will defuse the situation for you.


 

 

post #252 of 267
Quote:
Originally Posted by spindrift View Post





There is some truth in this.

 

However, it is worth noting, yet again, that skis span a design spectrum. The design of conventional skis is optimized for firm snow. That design makes them weak performers in soft snow. In contrast, the design of modern rockered skis makes them substantially more at home in soft snow. Even snow that is not "3D". This is embedded in the design characteristics of the skis and there is no escaping it.

 

This has a profound impact on technique. While you can make a case that the "basics" of balance are the same (or at least substantially similar), the fact is that skiing soft snow on conventional skis requires you to develop technique whose mission is to defeat the most basic design characteristics of the ski. Whereas skiing soft snow well on modern rockered skis centers on developing technique that takes advantage of the core design characteristics of the ski.

 

The moral of the story: if you are a powder newb, get yourself on a well designed pair of skis that has tip + tail rocker and is at least 100 underfoot - and that is a minimum. That way you will be spend your time learning to ski powder rather than to undo the essence of your firm snow oriented ski.

 

 



  Well said.

 

post #253 of 267

not very well said (over-simplified McConkey logic), because there are wide skis,105+ , with conventional designs that work excellent in powder. If by conventional you mean camber and concave sidecut.

post #254 of 267

Absolutely,

If you really want that full flat tail mired somewhere back there in the deep, by all means have at it. 

 

I'm glad you're having fun.

 

Smearing is possible with the old school shapes, but the sweet creamy smears in nearly every condition is best with full rocker.  I'd need at least some early rise before I even consider parting with cash for some boards these days.

 

post #255 of 267

Buy a pair of 2008-2010 K2 Pontoons online on sale (or the new 2011-12 K2 Pon2oons)... 130mm width under foot with lots of rocker... problem solved.  I skied very centered, didn't get weight too far forward, but didn't lean back either.  I used to have trouble in deep powder... until I bought a pair of Pontoons (white/red).  Went out to Alta for some spring skiing in April 2011... and was skiing like a rockstar.  Couldn't believe how well I was skiing.  Could take on just about anything on the mountain... as long as there was deep powder.   Have NEVER had more fun skiing in my life.

post #256 of 267
Fat skis help skiers in soft snow. A skier w/ a strong foundation not so much. I prefer sl skis if there's any kind of base to bend the skis. Whatever puts a smile on your face.
post #257 of 267

The faster you ski the more your skis will float and the easier they will turn. But as others have said, start with shallower powder--no deeper than mid shin, and work your way into deeper stuff.

Steeper runs are easier--flats can be miserable in deep pow. 

If you see that your tips are buried you're doing it wrong--because you shouldn't be looking at your tips. You should have no idea where your tips are. Keep your eyes up--good advice for skiing and especially for hockey.

post #258 of 267
Quote:
Originally Posted by mowmow View Post

A skier w/ a strong foundation not so much.

 

You forgot your smiley. That classic Defago video tells all...

post #259 of 267

yep but when  the idot running the boat looks like he grew devils horns ..you can just let go of the rope

post #260 of 267
Quote:
Originally Posted by soulskier View Post

Remember when you were a kid and you put your arm out the window of a moving car? You discovered that when you turned your hand a bit, the wind catches it and makes some G force. Do the same thing from the waste down.

Stick my legs out the car window? wink.gif
post #261 of 267

Do not ski in powder.  If you encounter powder, ski around it. Do not let other people do it either.  They will thank you for it.

 

 If the weather forecast predicts snow, stay home.  Call all of your skier friends and tell them to do the same.  Powder skiing is hazardous.  Not only can you get injured doing it, but it may lead to a number of health issues including, but not limited to, impotence, skin rash, loss of hair and other impairments.  

 

In some jurisdictions, inhaling white powdery substances is illegal and may lead to criminal prosecution.  You can't ski without breathing; so, stay out of it!

 

No need to thank me!  Just spread the word.

 

You are welcome! 

post #262 of 267

Generally there is a relationship btw how firm the snow surface is and how much pressure you as a skier need to exert on the snow to ski effectively. On one end of the spectrum is ice and the other is super dry pow. In between can be found everything from corn snow to hero groomers etc. (I learned this from the man the myth the legend Douglas Saxe when I was about age 13... he is a fantastic coach... and I have passed this theory on many times - props Doug) 

 

At any rate here are 3 tips: 

1. Go strait 

2. Relax but keep you shoulders square and level

3. Don't try to control the exact line your skis take - let'em go 

post #263 of 267

For me the link jc-ski posted is always what i need to remember.  KISS method.  I always over think the first few big dumps of the season.  Coming from a racing back round i always try to control everything my skis are doing all the time.  Need to relax and keep it simple. 

post #264 of 267
Quote:
Originally Posted by skiingaround View Post
 

- Find out who your true friends are, as people who give up skiing fresh, untracked powder, to give you lessons or help you search for your skis, is a true friend.

 

Wow. You have a high standard of friendship. That's asking a lot! :D  My friends and I all have abandonment issues.

post #265 of 267
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post
 

most important. ski well to begin with. it's all the same at the core of the experience.

So true. 

Stay in the center of your skis, and work from there, do not lean way back or way forwards. One person said just fly down the mountain, NO, keep in control, if you want to stay healthy, some places out west doing that could get you killed. You need to feel comfortable and develop confidence, but not be foolhardy. Confidence comes from experience. GET FAT SKIS. 

post #266 of 267
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlashGordon View Post

 

Wow. You have a high standard of friendship. That's asking a lot! " src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/biggrin.gif">  My friends and I all have abandonment issues.

 



No friends on powder days!
post #267 of 267

To all those who talk about sitting on the heels of the skis and worrying about the tips of you skis being under the snow, that is why you are struggling.  Secret #1 is a balanced stance (fore and aft, left and right) and maintaining it as you move through the snow and encounter resistance.  You want as big a platform as possible.  Forget about your edges!  You do not need them.  Powder is a fluid that you move through, not a hard surface that your skis have to follow or scratch.  If you want to learn how to stay balanced fore and aft, take a lesson in crud after a storm.  

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