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How to ski Powder? Please Post your tips and suggestions! - Page 8

post #211 of 267


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by skiingaround View Post

just what exactly is too narrow? I am curious what the ideal powder width is. I remember great powder days on my volkl p40's, and they were narrow. But I'm on about an 84mm width on my k2 public enemies and i couldn't imagine needing a wider ski. When I worked in Utah I skied some seriously deep powder with quite a bit narrower than 84mm.  How wide do you need to go. If you think we're not skiing it aggressive enough, well, that's a surprise.



As I said, it really depends on what you want to do, if you are happy wallowing through the powder at low speed, I'm sure Public Enemies do the job as poorly as any other 'all mountain' ski, but if you want to go faster, drop bigger cliffs, or do any tricks, I find the bigger the better. On a powder day here I ski on 185s with a 127 mm waist. In NZ I find 100mm underfoot is fine. I really can't understand how anyone could ski deep powder on a big ski, then go back to their smaller ones, so I can only assume you haven't. Give it a go, then get back to us.

post #212 of 267

Now THIS is how you ski powder.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j-liVCYKHEs

post #213 of 267
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alta Dude View Post

Now THIS is how you ski powder.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j-liVCYKHEs


Backseat and arms flailing?

post #214 of 267

I'm quite surprised that with all the great powder skiers at Alta, Snowbird a person from Sandy Utah would say that: "THIS..."

 

For the first time is a long while, I'm with EC on this one. Snow that good, and not all that deep, those dudes should be able to rip it up, and they didn't.  Not even close. Have you been "hiding under a rock somewhere?"

post #215 of 267


Quote:

Originally Posted by davluri View Post

I'm quite surprised that with all the great powder skiers at Alta, Snowbird a person from Sandy Utah would say that: "THIS..."

 

For the first time is a long while, I'm with EC on this one. Snow that good, and not all that deep, those dudes should be able to rip it up, and they didn't.  Not even close. Have you been "hiding under a rock somewhere?"



LMFAO....you and EC kill me.  These dudes from the early '70s tearing it up old school on those pins, and you can't even recognize how cool that is.  Oh well, to each his own.

post #216 of 267

you're right. I had written: "unless they're on the old sticks and that is 1975 or something", and then changed my mind about typing it.redface.gif My ridiculous there. I mean given the pants and all. biggrin.gif It is really cool. There's film of Greg Beck ripping it up like that.

post #217 of 267
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alta Dude View Post


Quote:



LMFAO....you and EC kill me.  These dudes from the early '70s tearing it up old school on those pins, and you can't even recognize how cool that is.  Oh well, to each his own.


Oh...I think it's really cool. But it's almost 40 years old and not relevant to how to ski powder on modern equipment. And i'm sure it will get reposted a hundred more times. Nostalgia is awesome.

post #218 of 267

Thanks to the recent storm, I got to ski some powder for the first time. Had about a 1 to 2 feet on top of groomed snow. So being out there, and having no real clue how to ski it, was such a blast, and punishing at the same time. I got about 4 runs in before the trails got so tracked up they were more of a very soft groomed trail where I could feel the bottom.

 

Couple questions though. Turn initation. I tried a couple different things with uhh... varying results. First I tried just tipping the skis over on edge. This worked pretty good, until I tipped them maybe too much just as I hit some denser snow, and Bam, I turned super fast and was perpindicular to the fall line in a split second trying to catch my balance. So next I decided to try just putting more weight on one foot to start a turn. This also worked pretty good. For a while. Until I had to make a long right turn as two trails converged, and I think I was too heavy on the downhill ski. It sunk and hit the bottom at an odd angle, and shortly after so did the rest of me.

 

So.... tip or weight to start a turn? I also read something about bouncing to start a turn.. or is that just for really deep stuff?

post #219 of 267

gobucks: lucky guy! sounds like you enjoyed your first powder experience. 

 

Bouncing in powder (through flexing and extending the knee, ankle and hip) helps in a couple of ways... first, if you can bounce, you're using your whole range of motion--and you'll need that range once you hit a big pile or your tip dives. when the snow grabs, you need to really push your skis forward just to stay balanced. second, it helps you to establish a steering platform. once you bounce, when you start to land again you have maximum pressure against your skis, and it's much easier to turn. Bouncing is a good starting point at least. 

 

Depending on how heavy the new snow is, you may be able to steer through tipping and pivoting, or you may just be able to tip a bit.

 

I hope you get some more powder this season!

post #220 of 267

Gobucks, try this technique, it's a bit different but may work for you. For this methord, forget any talk about 'pivoting', 'tipping' and 'edges'. Instead,

Step 1. Think about what the core of you is doing, that is your abdomin. Keep it centered and the powder skiing will happen. An exercise to help with this is to shout at the end of a turn. Sounds crazy, but this will tighten up your abs.

Step 2. When it comes to turning, think about where your knees want to go. Don't think about how you're going to turn your skis under a foot of snow. You have eyeballs on your knees and point your knees/eyeballs where you want to go.

Step 3. Just give it time, it will happen, but be ready to:

- Take some serious face plants

- Spent 30+ minutes looking for a ski

- Exhaust yourself digging yourself out of deep powder

- Find out who your true friends are, as people who give up skiing fresh, untracked powder, to give you lessons or help you search for your skis, is a true friend.

post #221 of 267


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by skiingaround View Post

Gobucks, try this technique, it's a bit different but may work for you. For this methord, forget any talk about 'pivoting', 'tipping' and 'edges'. Instead,

Step 1. Think about what the core of you is doing, that is your abdomin. Keep it centered and the powder skiing will happen. An exercise to help with this is to shout at the end of a turn. Sounds crazy, but this will tighten up your abs.

Step 2. When it comes to turning, think about where your knees want to go. Don't think about how you're going to turn your skis under a foot of snow. You have eyeballs on your knees and point your knees/eyeballs where you want to go.

Step 3. Just give it time, it will happen, but be ready to:

- Take some serious face plants

- Spent 30+ minutes looking for a ski

- Exhaust yourself digging yourself out of deep powder

- Find out who your true friends are, as people who give up skiing fresh, untracked powder, to give you lessons or help you search for your skis, is a true friend.


 

you can pivot. tip and use your edge in powder.

 

1. great advice

2. my knees dont want to go anywhere. Why would my skis be under the snow? IF I am looking at my knees how can I see where I am going? So I am just looking where I want to go?

3. I have never had to do any of that learning to ski powder. I also learned on a 105mm ski that let me make mistake with out causing me to fall everytime I made one. The newer stuff is even better Id use it instead of falling all over the place.

 

 

post #222 of 267

gobucks, I'm pretty much a newbie myself, certainly when it comes to skiing powder, but there are some things I've found helpful I thought I'd pass along, FWIW.

 

First off I've been living in Colorado since November, and have been able to get out on the snow a lot and improve a bit. But as good as this season has been, (and by virtually all accounts it's been a really exceptional season), there haven't been that many days with more than 6" of fresh snow. There have been a lot of great soft snow days with a  few inches of fresh, but really very few with something over 10-12" of powder. Consequently the opportunities to try to really ski powder have been limited. (And I know there are a lot of folks here who would consider 12" to just be a starting point for skiing powder, maybe even on the low side. Certainly not bottomless.)

 

In case you haven't come across them already there are tons of threads/posts here on Epic about skiing powder. I've perused a lot of them, and in the process been exposed to a lot of wisdom that's been offered here over the years. Many have offered the tip to think of skiing powder like an airplane banking. I think that's a good mental image - an airplane making a smooth, languid turn while say it's circling an airport. A unit turn - there is tipping, but the whole thing is banking into the turn. Translate that to skiing and there's little/none of the one-footed skiing, angulation and counter that you might have skiing on harder snow. The skis are close together, forming a platform, and move pretty much in unison with the rest of the body.

 

As to how to get that banking thing going, I found an old VHS tape by Lito Tejada-Flores from the mid-90's that focused on bumps and powder, and he offered in that tape a tip from a backcountry guide who skied a lot of powder with a heavy pack on. It essentially consisted of moving the arms to help initiate the banking turn.

 

As I've tried to ski powder I've come to think of that tip in a different way - as almost like holding a 3' diameter steering wheel about 18-24" inches in front of my chest, hands almost shoulder high. When I'm going straight the hands are at "9 and 3" position (think of the wheel as a clock face). When I want to turn left I turn the steering wheel to the left, so that my hands end up in something like a "7 and 1" position. When I turn right the hands end up something like "11 and 5". (How far the "steering wheel" gets turned depends on the turn, of course.)

 

clockface.jpg

 

When  the hands/arms move up into those positions they help the body bank into the turn. Again, everything moves together - as hands/arms move and the body banks smoothly let the skis tip together - the unit turn. And one good by-product of  using the "steering wheel" in this way is that your arms stay up and well out in front of you, which I believe most would agree is essential to skiing powder well.

 

This arm thing may be somewhat of an old school technique, but it really helped me ski some powder runs comfortably/successfully. Try it next time you have a chance - maybe it will help you too.  ;-)

post #223 of 267

Thanks all for the advice, hopefully I'll get a chance to try them this season. NOAA says theres a possibile 3 feet coming between tues-thurs this week for Shasta. Now if I could just get away from work!

post #224 of 267

Bushwackerin, what happens when you ski into the powder, you're skis are covered in snow, people sometimes find that hard to deal with when they think about turn. I never said look at your knees, but think of pointing them where you want to go. I also said this was a different method, not the only one, not the best one, but it might work. I'm guessing that like you, i've taught many skiers how to ski piste, bumps, and powder. Some techniques work better for others.

Also, you're lucky you never had to search for a lost ski, or dig youself out of the powder. I think that's pretty rare, even with all the new equipment out there. Maybe even rare if you're on rockered skis.

post #225 of 267
Quote:
Originally Posted by skiingaround View Post

Bushwackerin, what happens when you ski into the powder, you're skis are covered in snow, people sometimes find that hard to deal with when they think about turn. I never said look at your knees, but think of pointing them where you want to go. I also said this was a different method, not the only one, not the best one, but it might work. I'm guessing that like you, i've taught many skiers how to ski piste, bumps, and powder. Some techniques work better for others.

Also, you're lucky you never had to search for a lost ski, or dig youself out of the powder. I think that's pretty rare, even with all the new equipment out there. Maybe even rare if you're on rockered skis.



Well I run stupid high DINs on my powder skis...so they dont come off have searched for others skis. also I find powder the easiest stuff to skis out there as long I am on something 80mm +

 

The thing is just remember that even the fattest skis wont bring you to the top in deep light snow, and sometimes you just cant see.

 

this is what the first of 2 40 inch storm we got this year looked like. BTW Snofun this is east coast at 4 pm.

 

189857_567668810164_17302943_32881013_7173361_n.jpg

post #226 of 267

Wow, looks like the east did well this year! Happy for you guys. 

post #227 of 267

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post





Well I run stupid high DINs on my powder skis...so they dont come off have searched for others skis. also I find powder the easiest stuff to skis out there as long I am on something 80mm +

 

The thing is just remember that even the fattest skis wont bring you to the top in deep light snow, and sometimes you just cant see.

 

this is what the first of 2 40 inch storm we got this year looked like. BTW Snofun this is east coast at 4 pm.

 

189857_567668810164_17302943_32881013_7173361_n.jpg



Now THAT is a PHOTO! yahoo.gif

 

 

post #228 of 267
Quote:
Originally Posted by jc-ski View Post

 

This arm thing may be somewhat of an old school technique, but it really helped me ski some powder runs comfortably/successfully. Try it next time you have a chance - maybe it will help you too.  ;-)


It is very old school, and unnecessary with modern technique and equipment. In fact, I don't think I even did that when skiing Berthoud Pass on 203's. Banking your entire body and flailing your arms requires a lot of energy, messes up your balance and makes for sluggish turns.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post





Well I run stupid high DINs on my powder skis...so they dont come off have searched for others skis. also I find powder the easiest stuff to skis out there as long I am on something 80mm +

 

The thing is just remember that even the fattest skis wont bring you to the top in deep light snow, and sometimes you just cant see.

 

Well, I don't run stupid high DINs on my powder skis. I am elderly, I still have my knees, and I want to keep them. I do use survey flagging. Pull 6' or so off the roll for each ski, tie a fat knot in one end and tie the other end to your binding. Tuck the flagging with the fat knot up under the gators of your bibs. It works like carrying an umbrella. If you carry the umbrella, it doesn't rain. If you have powder cords (commercial or home-made), your ski probably won't come off. If you don't have powder cords, you are guaranteed to lose a ski at speed and it will go 50' under the powder without you on it, and you'll find it next summer. Maybe. frown.gif

 

BWPA is absolutely right in that even big skis will run under the surface in light powder, and tipping the skis, rockered or not, works fine in powder. The edges don't really engage the same way they do on hardpack, but it doesn't matter. The bottom of the ski takes the place of the edge. The ski bends and turns (although a rockered ski doesn't have to bend any more than its unloaded shape, which is part of what makes it easy).

 

As has already been said:

Find moderate slope with 6" fresh. Start straight down. Tip skis. Wait. Turn will happen.

Alternative:

Find groomed moderate slope with ungroomed powder at sides. Start down the hill, turn toward the side (to the left, say) and start turn in opposite direction (right) before entering powder. Allow the turn to extend so you arc through the powder and back to the groom as you complete your turn. Ride the skis through the fall line while tipped, but do not attempt to force them around abruptly to get back to the groom. Be patient and let them turn.

 

The alternative has the advantage that you get to initiate on the groom, where you're confident, but you are required to execute a round, patient turn in order to go into the powder and back out again. You learn to wait and allow the turn to develop. A Z-turn on the groom won't get you to the powder, or if you attempt a Z-turn while in the powder, success is unlikely.

 

If you are sampling the powder on the left side of a run, for example, you want to start your right turn and be on the right-hand (downhill) edges of your skis by the time you enter the powder. If you are still on the left edges when you enter the powder, you will have to initiate the right turn in the powder, which may cause you to feel like you need to hurl the skis around abruptly to get back out of the powder, if you're having trouble with confidence in the powder.

 

If you do initiate a turn in the powder, you still need to wait and allow the turn to develop.

 

A good, solid round turn is a Biggus Dealus in powder. Bouncing, retractions and pivot turn entries are all great tools in powder, and you will acquire them, but they are more complex than a basic tip-and-allow type turn. And when I say tip, I mean the skis, not the entire body.

post #229 of 267

Another alternative method of learning to ski powder:

 

Find a steep slope full of trees and two feet of fresh. Start straight down. Turn or die. Learn defensive skiing.

 

This method is not recommended, unless you only want to ski powder once, because if you're scared of it, you won't want to go back.

 

Stretch your comfort zone, but don't shatter it.

post #230 of 267
Quote:
Originally Posted by jhcooley View Post

 

A good, solid round turn is a Biggus Dealus in powder. Bouncing, retractions and pivot turn entries are all great tools in powder, and you will acquire them, but they are more complex than a basic tip-and-allow type turn. And when I say tip, I mean the skis, not the entire body.


Thats a good point, and reminds me of another question I had. So you can basically tip the skis, ride a nice round turn, and as long is speed is sufficient, you wont need to do anything else to keep from sinking?
 

 

post #231 of 267
Quote:
Originally Posted by jhcooley View Post

It is very old school, and unnecessary with modern technique and equipment. In fact, I don't think I even did that when skiing Berthoud Pass on 203's. Banking your entire body and flailing your arms requires a lot of energy, messes up your balance and makes for sluggish turns.

 

Check this pic from Bob Peters' "Jackson Hole March Madness 3-23-2011" Thread...
 

1000x500px-LL-95cfdc09_IMG_6459.jpg


Hmm.

 

BTW - "flailing" - your term, not mine.

post #232 of 267

Why did you post this picture?  Do you have a point?

post #233 of 267
Quote:
Originally Posted by tetonpwdrjunkie View Post

Why did you post this picture?  Do you have a point?


His point is that this guy appears to be banking and he is a very good powder skier associated with Bob Peters.

 

jc-ski had said earlier that banking like an airplane and moving his arms as if using a steering wheel helped him ski powder (post #222). I had said that such moves are unnecessary and tend to interfere with balance. I also used the term "flailing" to describe the arm movements which jc-ski said go from 11-5 on a right turn to 7-1 on a left turn. Seemed pretty extreme to me.

 

Since the guy in the picture obviously knows what he's doing, my assertions are obviously incorrect, I don't know what I am talking about, and I am most likely an internet troll who has never skied anything, let alone powder.

 

First, regarding the picture: The slope appears to tip downhill toward the right-hand side of the picture. The guy is banking, but probably not as much as it seems. He may be more nearly perpendicular to the slope than it appears at first glance. And his hands, while tipped with his body, are certainly not in either the 11-5 or 7-1 position.

 

We might also note that one picture doesn't really show us how this guy skis. There is much we don't know. It does look like very challenging "powder," though. It's flying up in chunks.

 

Banking can be a fun way to play. It's not what I would recommend as a "go-to" powder turn, though.

 

The skis themselves do bank when tipped, even if the body stays calm, balanced and centered. I often think of flying the skis in the three-dimensional medium that is powder. And often, the skis are kept close together, almost a single platform. But I still seek an upper-lower body separation similar to what's used for skiing anywhere else. The skis are tipping/banking, the skis rise to the surface or dive deep - but not my head and shoulders.

 

But what do I know? I made it all up. I just sit in a chair and type.
 

 

post #234 of 267
Quote:
Originally Posted by gobucks View Post


Thats a good point, and reminds me of another question I had. So you can basically tip the skis, ride a nice round turn, and as long is speed is sufficient, you wont need to do anything else to keep from sinking?
 

 


Well, when you're first learning, you most likely are looking for only 4-8" of powder anyway, so no, you don't need to do anything to keep from sinking, since you'll be mostly skiing on the firm surface underneath.

 

In general, you don't really need to worry about sinking, especially if you're on big skis. If you sit back because you think you need to see your tips (or for whatever reason), you'll be using your quads to keep yourself upright, and the tails of your skis, firmly engaged because you're sitting back on them, will tend to make them want to go straight. Rockers are more forgiving, but they'll still turn more easily if you're standing in the middle of them.

 

Stand in the middle of your skis. They're easiest to control from there.

 

Note that these initial "tip and ride" turns are just the beginning. You're learning patience, which is very important in powder, and the feeling of having soft snow around your skis and feet. You're learning balance. But you don't have much control over turn radius yet, at least if you're keeping it simple, being patient and not trying to do too much.

 

It will come. Once you learn that tipping works, once you get the feel for the effective balance point, you can start guiding the skis, gently, patiently, and altering the turn radius. You can get comfortable with a little speed. You can let the snow push your skis up off the surface underneath. You can drive them back to the surface underneath. You can discover retractions. Sooner than you think, you might try something where there isn't any firm surface underneath, or at least not close enough to the surface to ski on much.

post #235 of 267

He might appear to be banking, but I wouldn't call it that at this point in his turn.  He is certainly inclinated without being angulated, but it is in the top third of his turn where I wouldn't normally expect to see a lot of angulation developing.  I don't normally assume that everyone that skis with Bob Peters is a great powder skier.  I know Bob and see and talk with him on a regular basis.  He is very good, but not nearly as good as his reputation on this board.  I know Bob would agree with this, because nobody could ever be THAT good.  I also know that Bob skis with a lot of people at all levels.

 

Anyway his inside arm "might" be a little bit dropped here, but to me it doesn't look that "extreme" or damning.  His inside hand is in front like it should be following his pole plant and if you look at his hand and shoulder angles, they are pretty close to matching the angle of the slope.  I would like to see more anticipation with his hips and upper body to match the direction that he is looking.  He is looking towards his turn apex and I would like to see the whole package line up a little more.  This is just one photo and before I would say that he is banking or flailing or much else I would like to see how he looks at turn completion.  IMO he look balanced and solid even though I can nit-pick a little.

 

I agree with your earlier comments about the banking and the flailing being unnecessary and compromising balance even though they "might" help some people be able to get through some powder conditions.  Banking can work when a skier is moving fast enough to generate centrifugal force, but doesn't do much for that skier as the snow gets harder and edge "bite" becomes more critical.  Banking and arm flailing tend to be linked as the skier who banks will need a bigger upper body movement to generate some rotary force and to get the CM into the next turn.  This works, but is slow and the skier who relies on this "technique" is always late into the next turn.  Being late into the next turn will generally mean being in the backseat.  It is amazing to me how good some people get at skiing in the backseat.  Most of them can't ski a full day because their quads burn.

 

I would say that your arms should be all the time more or less at 3 & 9 and that the upper body and hips should point towards the apex of the next turn (this is not necessarily down the fall line as many on here like to advise).  This could make it seem like the hands are at 11 & 5 or 7 & 1.  They might be if the arms flail as you say and the upper body isn't stable.  I agree with you and disagree with jc-ski.  I don't think the picture he posted supports his position and that's why I was curious as to his point. 
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jhcooley View Post




His point is that this guy appears to be banking and he is a very good powder skier associated with Bob Peters.

 

jc-ski had said earlier that banking like an airplane and moving his arms as if using a steering wheel helped him ski powder (post #222). I had said that such moves are unnecessary and tend to interfere with balance. I also used the term "flailing" to describe the arm movements which jc-ski said go from 11-5 on a right turn to 7-1 on a left turn. Seemed pretty extreme to me.

 

Since the guy in the picture obviously knows what he's doing, my assertions are obviously incorrect, I don't know what I am talking about, and I am most likely an internet troll who has never skied anything, let alone powder.

 

First, regarding the picture: The slope appears to tip downhill toward the right-hand side of the picture. The guy is banking, but probably not as much as it seems. He may be more nearly perpendicular to the slope than it appears at first glance. And his hands, while tipped with his body, are certainly not in either the 11-5 or 7-1 position.

 

We might also note that one picture doesn't really show us how this guy skis. There is much we don't know. It does look like very challenging "powder," though. It's flying up in chunks.

 

Banking can be a fun way to play. It's not what I would recommend as a "go-to" powder turn, though.

 

The skis themselves do bank when tipped, even if the body stays calm, balanced and centered. I often think of flying the skis in the three-dimensional medium that is powder. And often, the skis are kept close together, almost a single platform. But I still seek an upper-lower body separation similar to what's used for skiing anywhere else. The skis are tipping/banking, the skis rise to the surface or dive deep - but not my head and shoulders.

 

But what do I know? I made it all up. I just sit in a chair and type.
 

 



 

post #236 of 267

No Marshall McLuhan Moment seems to be forthcoming, so I'll simply add...

 

In the spirit of the thread I was simply trying to pass along, as one powder newbie to another, something that worked for me.

 

Cheerio.

 

 

post #237 of 267

Funny clip.  In the spirit of the thread you should post whatever helps you and those who read can decide what will work for them.  I doubt that anyone is deliberately posting misinformation to mess other people up, I just happen to disagree with your "tips".  If they help you and you enjoy skiing that way, that's great...  Carry on.  I'm quite sure that you could learn to be more efficient and then you could ski more exciting and challenging lines.  A person can practice crappy moves and become quite good at crappy skiingrolleyes.gif.  That's my opinion and my advice may be worth less than you paid for it.  Sometimes it is a "mystery to me how I get to teach anything".wink.gif

post #238 of 267

 

     Quote:

Originally Posted by Bob Peters View Post





In the US, it's Grand Targhee.

 

Hands down.  End of story.

 

Bob:  Wow...what a POWDER thread!  I was supposed to be working this afternoon and instead I read a lot of this discussion and watched videos from the Targhee and Pow Mow websites.  (As an aside, it looked like the slopeside accommodations in Targhee looked a little more, shall we say, "comfortable" than at Pow Mow...would that be a correct assessment?)  In any event, I'm going to have to get up there somehow next year, with or without kids (although the Targhee "Kid Zone" looked like killer fun).

 

 


"Your Honor, with all due respect, if you're going to try my case for me, I wish you wouldn't lose it."  --Frank Galvin, The Verdict
 

 

post #239 of 267

Good skiing is good skiing, on a groomer, in powder, in crud, in bumps, etc... There are is no special technique for powder skiing (with or without fat / rockered skis).  If you are  a "good skier" and you still get worked skiing powder this indicates that you have some underlying weak spot in your technique. You can be good at somethings and still weak in other areas. Buying a turn with fat rockers will probably help, but ultimately does not address the underlying problem.

 

A powder day is a great time to take a lesson to work on powder tactics. But its a horrible time do drills and other skill building work when you really just want to go ski the fun lines and soft snow.

 

It is not easy to admit that you need to improve when you think you are a good skier and it will take time. Find a coach at your home mountain, take a series of lessons, or do a week long clinic (ESA, etc...) Work on fixing the weak spots in your technique whatever those may be. Work to develop good well balanced and efficient technique that works everyday, in all conditions. And then when you hit a powder day you will be prepared to rip it.

 

$.02

 

 


Edited by tromano - 3/26/11 at 7:41pm
post #240 of 267

Holy Cow!

Not good stuff.  Skiing like this just doesn't work on variable terrain

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