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What's your ski trip rig? Lets see some pictures! - Page 6

post #151 of 428


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiingPilot View Post





It's not a person skiing, but I do see your point. The main gear is fixed so the pilot can use them to turn, unless he uses differential braking but he cant because of the skis attached to the gear. Also this isn't a field covered in snow, but a frozen lake with snow on top of it. It also has clumps of snow here and there, and if landing on snow has similar techniques as landing on grass, then the pilot is trying to keep the nose gear from burying into the snow so hes going to put back pressure on the plane, so that most of the weight is on the main gear and plane retains most of the directional control with its nose wheel(if you look at the video at around :57-1:00 you will see that the pilot is putting back pressure on the plane). The pilot will keep the props spinning a little faster than the recommended taxi setting so that the plane will have more speed so that it won't sink.


Ah so the pilot DOES keep the props spinning faster...so the plane won't sink.  This comes back to needing fatter skis on it in the first place.  Rockered ones.  If the pilot had thought to attach those before he left, rather than the ancient GS boards it looks like he's using now, he could simply float effortlessly above the snow, while slashing turns in front of his bro-bras and dissing the honeys, without even having to try.  He'd make it look so easy and fun.

post #152 of 428
Quote:
Originally Posted by kawo View Post


 


Meh...no faceshots.



To each their own.  Some like to be in the snow, some on top of it. biggrin.gif

post #153 of 428
Quote:
Originally Posted by FujativeOCR View Post


 


Ah so the pilot DOES keep the props spinning faster...so the plane won't sink.  This comes back to needing fatter skis on it in the first place.  Rockered ones.  If the pilot had thought to attach those before he left, rather than the ancient GS boards it looks like he's using now, he could simply float effortlessly above the snow, while slashing turns in front of his bro-bras and dissing the honeys, without even having to try.  He'd make it look so easy and fun.


The problem is, the bigger the ski the more weight you put on the airplane, which in turn can equal to less cargo or passengers or less fuel. There are also airplanes where the skis are actually made into the main gear as in this video and there is a slight rocker to them but you don't really notice it because of the weight of the plane on the skis. 

Here this pilot is "slashing turns in front of his bro-bras and dissing the honeys". The reason the pilot is going around in circles is to pack the snow so that when they put in cargo or passengers board the plane won't sink.

post #154 of 428
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiingPilot View Post




The problem is, the bigger the ski the more weight you put on the airplane, which in turn can equal to less cargo or passengers or less fuel. There are also airplanes where the skis are actually made into the main gear as in this video and there is a slight rocker to them but you don't really notice it because of the weight of the plane on the skis. 

Here this pilot is "slashing turns in front of his bro-bras and dissing the honeys". The reason the pilot is going around in circles is to pack the snow so that when they put in cargo or passengers board the plane won't sink.


But if he used modern technology in his skis, like a Bamboo core and a semi twin tip with Resort Rocker, it would translate into a huge weight savings, as well as lower maintenance costs for the company, since Bamboo is very strong and rebounds easy, so fewer bent skis to MEL.

 

That being said, this pilot is way more on his game with the turning in deep snow.  You can see while driving in circles, he's just leaning on edge with only slight forward pressure, and letting the skis sidecut do the work.  Minimal differential power is needed.

post #155 of 428
Quote:
Originally Posted by FujativeOCR View Post




But if he used modern technology in his skis, like a Bamboo core and a semi twin tip with Resort Rocker, it would translate into a huge weight savings, as well as lower maintenance costs for the company, since Bamboo is very strong and rebounds easy, so fewer bent skis to MEL.

 

That being said, this pilot is way more on his game with the turning in deep snow.  You can see while driving in circles, he's just leaning on edge with only slight forward pressure, and letting the skis sidecut do the work.  Minimal differential power is needed.

 

You have to keep in mind that these airplanes weigh a couple tons with most of the weight focused on the main landing gear and when landing you have more weight focused on the landing gear. Maintenance costs would be a little higher if you use bamboo, since you will have to keep checking the skis before each use to see if the bamboo has some imperfection or if it was bent to its limit. The skis have a clean aerodynamic design making use of some of the latest developments in reinforced plastics - a properly proportioned ski for best weight distribution and shock loads.  The hollow design of fiberglass reinforced plastics allows the skis to absorb extremely high shock loads without damage to skis or aircraft. Designed with a flexible tip and large flat planing area to allow for maximum support, fast planing and quick rise-out in deep snow. Rolled edges and angled bushings help lessen side loads on the landing gear and axles to allow for greater maneuverability. Hope this answers your question. biggrin.gif

post #156 of 428

^^^ all this skidding in the bumps because of that wide stance. No ski - rockered or GS - is going to help with this smile.gif 

post #157 of 428
Quote:
Originally Posted by VladL View Post

^^^ all this skidding in the bumps because of that wide stance. No ski - rockered or GS - is going to help with this smile.gif



imagine the ride inside the airplane though

post #158 of 428
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiingPilot View Post



 

You have to keep in mind that these airplanes weigh a couple tons with most of the weight focused on the main landing gear and when landing you have more weight focused on the landing gear. Maintenance costs would be a little higher if you use bamboo, since you will have to keep checking the skis before each use to see if the bamboo has some imperfection or if it was bent to its limit. The skis have a clean aerodynamic design making use of some of the latest developments in reinforced plastics - a properly proportioned ski for best weight distribution and shock loads.  The hollow design of fiberglass reinforced plastics allows the skis to absorb extremely high shock loads without damage to skis or aircraft. Designed with a flexible tip and large flat planing area to allow for maximum support, fast planing and quick rise-out in deep snow. Rolled edges and angled bushings help lessen side loads on the landing gear and axles to allow for greater maneuverability. Hope this answers your question. biggrin.gif



My Uncle Steve from Nebraska weighs a couple tons also and he skied a Bamboo cored Liberty Helix for the last two seasons at Vail, and he never had a single problem with one of them decambering or delaminating.  The things they are doing over there in China with Bamboo these days is amazing.  I'd venture to say they are better at building skis out of bamboo than even deHavilland is out of plastic.  Did those plastic skis on the Twin Otter come with any base structure or edge bevel?  What about a tip and tail detune?  I bet the FAA would have a field day if they knew what a poor design plastic skis were.  As far as fast planing and quick rise out of deep snow, that is exactly what Rocker is designed to do!  Just don't take your Twin Otter on hard pack with these skis.  And angled bushings?  What is that?  Salomon has been producing the aptly named "Pilot" system for years with a side mount/pivot point to lesson side loads.  You should mount a set on the Otter, 14 DIN should be fine.

post #159 of 428
Quote:
Originally Posted by FujativeOCR View Post





My Uncle Steve from Nebraska weighs a couple tons also and he skied a Bamboo cored Liberty Helix for the last two seasons at Vail, and he never had a single problem with one of them decambering or delaminating.  The things they are doing over there in China with Bamboo these days is amazing.  I'd venture to say they are better at building skis out of bamboo than even deHavilland is out of plastic.  Did those plastic skis on the Twin Otter come with any base structure or edge bevel?  What about a tip and tail detune?  I bet the FAA would have a field day if they knew what a poor design plastic skis were.  As far as fast planing and quick rise out of deep snow, that is exactly what Rocker is designed to do!  Just don't take your Twin Otter on hard pack with these skis.  And angled bushings?  What is that?  Salomon has been producing the aptly named "Pilot" system for years with a side mount/pivot point to lesson side loads.  You should mount a set on the Otter, 14 DIN should be fine.


Hahaha nice, you can set up your own shop and make skis for the airplanes and see what happens.

post #160 of 428

I don't really see the point in checking to see if the ski was bent during landing anyway.  I mean honestly do you check the PSI in each tire before each flight or do you just kick it and call it good?

post #161 of 428
Quote:
Originally Posted by FujativeOCR View Post

I don't really see the point in checking to see if the ski was bent during landing anyway.  I mean honestly do you check the PSI in each tire before each flight or do you just kick it and call it good?



If its hard, then its good but if it isn't hard we go call the mechanic and tell them the tire isn't inflated properly. I would check the skis, if theres a dent or something, it will cause drag and might create a problem.

post #162 of 428

Nice landing. I was (seriously) wondering about how you get going again. The conditions on the lake made it seem like a lot of power was needed just to keep going. Do you line up your old tracks for take off to benefit from a packed runway? Do planes ever pitch pole on landing?

 

Are you the pilot in this vid?

post #163 of 428
Quote:
Originally Posted by kawo View Post


 


Meh...no faceshots.



Here ya go...

post #164 of 428
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiingPilot View Post





If its hard, then its good but if it isn't hard we go call the mechanic and tell them the tire isn't inflated properly. I would check the skis, if theres a dent or something, it will cause drag and might create a problem.


LOL I've just been goofin'.  I fly planes too ya' know. biggrin.gif


Edited by FujativeOCR - 10/23/10 at 1:32pm
post #165 of 428
Quote:
Originally Posted by FujativeOCR View Post




LOL I've just been goofin'.  I fly planes too ya' know. biggrin.gif



I never knew that, I'm usually flying around in SoCal, going to Camarillo or just enjoying the view from above, what about you? MastersRacer, I'm not the pilot(I'm not even qualified to fly something that big or into those kind of conditons) you do need more power than usual to be moving around, but I really can not answer all your questions. What do you mean by pitch pole?

post #166 of 428

I fly a Brasilia all over CA as well.  Used to fly it into Oxnard too!  Red Barn Visual, except for you couldn't see the Red Barn.

post #167 of 428
Quote:
Originally Posted by FujativeOCR View Post

I fly a Brasilia all over CA as well.  Used to fly it into Oxnard too!  Red Barn Visual, except for you couldn't see the Red Barn.



I just fly C172's but I have seen a lot of Brasilia's, United owned ones too! I have yet to fly to Oxnard, but I couldn't since I am not yet instrument rated. 

post #168 of 428

I'm really surprised someone hasn't posted one of these yet..  And the winner is...

 

subaru-snow-car.jpg

post #169 of 428
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiingPilot View Post





I just fly C172's but I have seen a lot of Brasilia's, United owned ones too! I have yet to fly to Oxnard, but I couldn't since I am not yet instrument rated. 


It's not ALWAYS foggy over there.  Isn't it only like a hop skip and a jump away from Camarillo?

post #170 of 428
Quote:
Originally Posted by FujativeOCR View Post




It's not ALWAYS foggy over there.  Isn't it only like a hop skip and a jump away from Camarillo?



I know its not foggy over there, I usually fly from Brackett Airport, it is a hop and a skip, but I haven't been able to fly because of the low clouds in SoCal.

post #171 of 428
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiingPilot View Post





I never knew that, I'm usually flying around in SoCal, going to Camarillo or just enjoying the view from above, what about you? MastersRacer, I'm not the pilot(I'm not even qualified to fly something that big or into those kind of conditons) you do need more power than usual to be moving around, but I really can not answer all your questions. What do you mean by pitch pole?


Pitch pole is a boating term. Its when you bury the bow in a wave and the stern comes up and over. I thought it might be used with airplanes, too.

 

MR
 

post #172 of 428
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4ster View Post

Wish it was this:

subaru-snow-ready.jpg

 

JF





Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

I'm really surprised someone hasn't posted one of these yet..  And the winner is...

 

subaru-snow-car.jpg



Page 1, post #27

post #173 of 428
Quote:
Originally Posted by MastersRacer View Post




Pitch pole is a boating term. Its when you bury the bow in a wave and the stern comes up and over. I thought it might be used with airplanes, too.

 

MR
 

I don't know how you would use it with airplanes, if your suggesting putting pressure on the nose wheel in hopes it would come back up, I would not recommend it, you might damage the strut if you do that.
 

post #174 of 428

Sully didn't Pitch Pole it.  You shouldn't either. biggrin.gif

post #175 of 428
Quote:
Originally Posted by FujativeOCR View Post

Sully didn't Pitch Pole it.  You shouldn't either. biggrin.gif



Unless you want a lot of damage to your aircraft and making up excuses to the FAA. haha

post #176 of 428
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiingPilot View Post





Unless you want a lot of damage to your aircraft and making up excuses to the FAA. haha


You don't need excuses for the FAA.  They make up their own answers.

post #177 of 428
Quote:
Originally Posted by FujativeOCR View Post




You don't need excuses for the FAA.  They make up their own answers.



 Happens a lot of the times with them.

post #178 of 428
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiingPilot View Post



I don't know how you would use it with airplanes, if your suggesting putting pressure on the nose wheel in hopes it would come back up, I would not recommend it, you might damage the strut if you do that.
 


Pitch poling is a bad thing. It usually breaks your boat, if not your spirit. I was just guessing that a plane landing on skis in a snowfield might sink a tip and end up flipping end over end.
 

post #179 of 428
Quote:
Originally Posted by MastersRacer View Post




Pitch poling is a bad thing. It usually breaks your boat, if not your spirit. I was just guessing that a plane landing on skis in a snowfield might sink a tip and end up flipping end over end.
 


That would happen and its not a pretty site too.

post #180 of 428

They have soft field landing techniques for just such an occasion.

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