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post #91 of 119
Thread Starter 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Artemat View Post

Thanks for the update. Do people climb up the mt for early turns yet?


Not sure if they do or not or even if it's allowed. Haven't seen anyone come down though but I haven't been able to scope things out too much yet. Just been too busy getting settled in first.
 

post #92 of 119

Well done Jave..  All the best.. live it..

post #93 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jave View Post

Quick update,

 

We just arrived in Whistler 3 days ago after a 5 day drive across Canada (amazing drive, except for the prairies.) Got a great little apartment with views of Whistler mtn from the front door and a dense forest at the back.

 

Already sold the house as we needed the money to live here for the first little while until we find work at least. I think I might take a couple months off though before finding work and just enjoy skiing smile.gif Got enough to last us a couple years without working but I don't want to blow our savings either.

 

The mountains have quite a bit of snow on them already and it just snowed a little at the base last night. 17 days until opening day!


How many hours a day were you driving? I'm driving out to bum it up in early january, and I have no real idea of how long it's going to take.

post #94 of 119
Thread Starter 


 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by angrysasquatch View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by Jave View Post

Quick update,

 

We just arrived in Whistler 3 days ago after a 5 day drive across Canada (amazing drive, except for the prairies.) Got a great little apartment with views of Whistler mtn from the front door and a dense forest at the back.

 

Already sold the house as we needed the money to live here for the first little while until we find work at least. I think I might take a couple months off though before finding work and just enjoy skiing smile.gif Got enough to last us a couple years without working but I don't want to blow our savings either.

 

The mountains have quite a bit of snow on them already and it just snowed a little at the base last night. 17 days until opening day!


How many hours a day were you driving? I'm driving out to bum it up in early january, and I have no real idea of how long it's going to take.


I drove probably an average of 11 hours a day. One day I drove 14 I think... that was brutal. I didn't really get interesting until after Calgary though. We took a bit of a detour from Banff up to Jasper, that was the most amazing drive I've ever done and highly recommended. You can check out a slideshow of the pictures from our trip here:

 


 

post #95 of 119

I'm proud of you, Jave.  You've just done something that maybe 1/2 of one percent of the skiing population does.

 

Having done something semi-similar myself, I can tell you that I've never regretted the decisions I've made that increased the time I could ski and spend in the mountains.  I've been around Jackson Hole, part or full time, for about 35 years and I've seen many young "ski bum" friends move into town, eke out an existence for awhile (but ski a hell of a lot), settle into a job or business that worked for them, find a significant other, get married, raise kids... basically lead a very healthy and happy life all because they came here to ski "for a season or two". wink.gif

 

A couple of suggestions now that you've jumped off the cliff.

 

If at all possible, try to get a job with the Whistler Blackcomb company.  For this season it'll probably be something entry level, but that's okay.  It'll do several things for you:

 

* Ski pass.  Almost all ski resort jobs will include a pass (that's part of the reason they can get away with paying squat).

 

* Connections. The chances are that WB is the biggest IT consumer in the local economy.  At some point, they will have openings in their IT department, maybe not right now but they will eventually.  Working for the resort will give you insight into department heads and critical people to know and how the overall operation works.  If you do your job this winter (whatever it might be), that builds credibility for when/if you ever try to get hired in the field you're best experienced for.

 

* Social networking. It's usually not hard to make friends in a ski resort, but having a job where you work with a bunch of people with similar interests makes it easier.  Part of what makes living in a ski community so magical is that shared passion for skiing.  It makes for instant common ground with the people you meet.  You'll make friends from all over the world.  You'll learn about new sports and new ideas and exotic places to visit.  Having a bunch of co-workers helps jump-start the friend-making process.

 

* Ski friends.  This is related to the social networking part.  I haven't really picked up on how good a skier you are.  Chances are you're pretty good, but it's nothing right now compared to what you will be if you spend a hundred days a year for the next two season skiing a world-class mountain like WB.  A big part of that growth as a skier will come from hooking up with some skiing/boarding friends who know the mountain and - hopefully - ride better than you do.  Get yourself in with a posse of good skiers who'll drag your butt around every part of the mountain in every kind of conditions.

 

So, have a fantastic time.  Never look back.  Thousands of people have made this same sort of thing work and made their lives much better in the bargain.  You will too.

 

And definitely keep us posted on how things are going. icon14.gif

post #96 of 119
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters View Post

I'm proud of you, Jave.  You've just done something that maybe 1/2 of one percent of the skiing population does.

 

Having done something semi-similar myself, I can tell you that I've never regretted the decisions I've made that increased the time I could ski and spend in the mountains.  I've been around Jackson Hole, part or full time, for about 35 years and I've seen many young "ski bum" friends move into town, eke out an existence for awhile (but ski a hell of a lot), settle into a job or business that worked for them, find a significant other, get married, raise kids... basically lead a very healthy and happy life all because they came here to ski "for a season or two". wink.gif

 

A couple of suggestions now that you've jumped off the cliff.

 

If at all possible, try to get a job with the Whistler Blackcomb company.  For this season it'll probably be something entry level, but that's okay.  It'll do several things for you:

 

* Ski pass.  Almost all ski resort jobs will include a pass (that's part of the reason they can get away with paying squat).

 

* Connections. The chances are that WB is the biggest IT consumer in the local economy.  At some point, they will have openings in their IT department, maybe not right now but they will eventually.  Working for the resort will give you insight into department heads and critical people to know and how the overall operation works.  If you do your job this winter (whatever it might be), that builds credibility for when/if you ever try to get hired in the field you're best experienced for.

 

* Social networking. It's usually not hard to make friends in a ski resort, but having a job where you work with a bunch of people with similar interests makes it easier.  Part of what makes living in a ski community so magical is that shared passion for skiing.  It makes for instant common ground with the people you meet.  You'll make friends from all over the world.  You'll learn about new sports and new ideas and exotic places to visit.  Having a bunch of co-workers helps jump-start the friend-making process.

 

* Ski friends.  This is related to the social networking part.  I haven't really picked up on how good a skier you are.  Chances are you're pretty good, but it's nothing right now compared to what you will be if you spend a hundred days a year for the next two season skiing a world-class mountain like WB.  A big part of that growth as a skier will come from hooking up with some skiing/boarding friends who know the mountain and - hopefully - ride better than you do.  Get yourself in with a posse of good skiers who'll drag your butt around every part of the mountain in every kind of conditions.

 

So, have a fantastic time.  Never look back.  Thousands of people have made this same sort of thing work and made their lives much better in the bargain.  You will too.

 

And definitely keep us posted on how things are going. icon14.gif

 

Thanks Bob, it's good to hear that from you!

 

Working for WB does seem like the best thing to do and I have indeed seen the most IT job postings from them. Like you said I'm going to try to find something entry level at first which is actually what I'd prefer as it feels like I need a bit of a break from IT but I definitely want to get back into it at some point.

 

Right now I just want to ski and I'm going nuts seeing the mountain every day but not being able to go up it. It's almost worse than being over 2000 miles away smile.gif.

 

If anyone here is from Whistler and would like to show me around once the mountain opens, that'd be awesome. I'm a decent skier and should be able to keep up most places.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

post #97 of 119

Speaking of that, I'm pretty sure there are several Epic members who ski WB all the time.  Spend a little time doing searches on Epic and see if you can identify a few of them who sound like fun and then just send them a private message.

 

Same thing with the TGR forums.

 

I would bet that you can find some people to hook up with for a few runs.  After that, whether they'll ski with you the next day is all a question whether you can keep up with them and whether you're fun to be around.

 

One last suggestion: Check around and see if you can find a beginning avalanche class.  Get yourself a pack, beacon, probe, and shovel.  Take the class.  Chances are that any locals you start to ski regularly with are going to have the gear and occasionally be going outside the gates.  You might as well get yourself geared up to go along.
 

Quote:

 

Right now I just want to ski and I'm going nuts seeing the mountain every day but not being able to go up it. It's almost worse than being over 2000 miles away smile.gif.

 

If anyone here is from Whistler and would like to show me around once the mountain opens, that'd be awesome.

 

post #98 of 119
Quote:

Originally Posted by Jave View Post

 

I have a girlfriend of 5 years and a dog, that's it. Girlfriend is coming with me as well.

  


Wouldn't expect to keep the girlfriend, but the dog will probably stick around. It's a great idea, even if only for one season. Use the profits from the house to get debt-free, travel as light as possible, try to live within the means of any income you can get, and look for an opportunity to leverage your skills into something permanent. If it doesn't work out, no big deal, you'll know what to do when you reach that point.
 

post #99 of 119
post #100 of 119


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters View Post

Speaking of that, I'm pretty sure there are several Epic members who ski WB all the time.  Spend a little time doing searches on Epic and see if you can identify a few of them who sound like fun and then just send them a private message.

 

Same thing with the TGR forums.

 

I would bet that you can find some people to hook up with for a few runs.  After that, whether they'll ski with you the next day is all a question whether you can keep up with them and whether you're fun to be around.

 

One last suggestion: Check around and see if you can find a beginning avalanche class.  Get yourself a pack, beacon, probe, and shovel.  Take the class.  Chances are that any locals you start to ski regularly with are going to have the gear and occasionally be going outside the gates.  You might as well get yourself geared up to go along.
 

Quote:

 

Right now I just want to ski and I'm going nuts seeing the mountain every day but not being able to go up it. It's almost worse than being over 2000 miles away smile.gif.

 

If anyone here is from Whistler and would like to show me around once the mountain opens, that'd be awesome.

 


Welcome to paradise! One way to act on several of Bob's suggestions is to hook up with the Whistler section of the Alpine Club of Canada. They'll likely be offering avalanche classes throughout the season and the local members will be more than happy to show you around.  You don't need to be a member to go on club trips. Nor do you need to go on club trips to chat with local members of the club. Just give 'em a call. Go to: http://www.alpineclubofcanada.ca/sections/whistler.html

 

If you don't have AT gear already you will certainly want some, even if only for slackcountry use. Once you get a glimpse of Fissile and Overlord on a clear day you'll be a goner. Ditto for Blackcomb and the wide open spaces along the Spearhead. There will likely be all kinds of deals in the village, if you are looking for AT gear. But it's worth taking a look at the Mountain Equipment Co-op's Online Gear Swap. All kinds of great deals there at the moment. Go to:

http://www.mec.ca/Apps/outdoorGearSwap/gearswap_main.jsp?FOLDER%3C%3Efolder_id=1408474396038596

 

Between now and opening day there is no need to wait. Just retrace your steps back up to the Duffey Lake road for some early season skiing in Marriott Basin.

 

Your pooch hit the jackpot. Lots o' pups in Whistler to hang with. Nice looking dog, I must say

post #101 of 119

Jave, great slide show! Thanks for posting. I am glad you finaly reached your destination! I wish I could do something like that, but I am not brave enough and my house doesn't have a shit of equity yet, so  I will stay here in Wenatchee Washington about 6 hours away from you and maybe one day I will vistit BC and ski with you!

post #102 of 119

Hey, how is snow in Canada? Any luck with  job and locals? Snow conditions in cascades suck.

post #103 of 119

Hi

I am doing the same thing more or less and I'n nearly 60!

We have just sold our house and moving in to our static holiday home till we can work in a resort in europe, only for the season. We 'aint got anywhere to stay apart from the van, so I suppose we'll be trailer trash! On the plus side. it is in our Lake District in North West  Egnland. It's Beautiful there, a bit like a mini Canada!

Our son worked in Vancouver last year and we visited. We went skiing in Whistler and did some snow shoeing and other great stuff!

If the flight was only 2 hours instead of 9, we'd live thereI

At your age I don't think it's a big mistake!

like they say " One life-Live it"

post #104 of 119

DO IT!  I am writing this while sitting at my desk working on uninteresting jobs at an uninteresting corporation. Lots of people sucking up here doing the corporate thing. GET OUT WHILE YOU CAN!

post #105 of 119

Worst thing that happens is that (after much skiing) you end up broke. Guess what?

 

I didn't start putting money away until age 35 when my daughter came along. Up until then, had a good paying steady job, and I was always broke. Every day. Paychecks came in and went right back out. Sometimes I ate steak, sometimes top ramen. Didn't matter, I had no responsibilities so I didn't need a wad in the bank. There's always time to get serious later.

 

"Skiing is a rich man's sport. The more you do it, the richer you are" I believe BWPA said.

post #106 of 119

Words to live by....

 

College degree. Good Job. Big House. We all make mistakes.

 

DSCF4050.JPG


Edited by MidwestPete - 8/1/11 at 11:26am
post #107 of 119

Shit, this looks like the mistake I made! I want that picture,,, where did you get it? 
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MidwestPete View Post

Words to live by....

 

College degree. Good Job. Big House. We all make mistakes.

 

DSCF4050.JPG



 

post #108 of 119

I bought it in Teton Village/Jackson Hole about 10 years ago. It also was part of a series of magazine ads.

post #109 of 119
Thread Starter 

Thought I’d give an update on my move to the mountains in case anyone’s interested.

 

Been here over two years now and the first winter we didn’t look for work and just skied as much as we could. This was awesome but of course we had to make money eventually. I was lucky enough to find a job in my field of IT which pays just as good as where I worked in Toronto which I never expected. This allowed us to keep much of the same lifestyle as back in Toronto while living in a ski town!

 

Of course I have to work week days but weekends (and powder "sick" days biggrin.gif) are all skiing and now also snowmobiling and ski touring! I know I moved out here for the winters but like many people I met here have said, “People come for the Winters but stay for the Summers” and that is very true. I almost love Summer more than Winter here after picking up mountain biking and hiking etc. Mountain bike lunch rides on the trails right behind work with your co-workers are hard to beat!

 

It hasn't been without challenges though. It is quite hard to make good friends here as most people only come for a few months or a season and then leave. It can also get quite boring during the two slow months (one in spring and one in fall) during the transition between winter and summer sports when there are barely any people around.

 

Despite that though, I really can’t imagine living anywhere other than the mountains now.

post #110 of 119

Good for you. Glad it worked out!

post #111 of 119

Cool, thanks for the update.  Two years you (and the others) should consider you a local since you also spend the summers there.  Well done!

post #112 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jave View Post

Thought I’d give an update on my move to the mountains in case anyone’s interested.

 

Been here over two years now and the first winter we didn’t look for work and just skied as much as we could. This was awesome but of course we had to make money eventually. I was lucky enough to find a job in my field of IT which pays just as good as where I worked in Toronto which I never expected. This allowed us to keep much of the same lifestyle as back in Toronto while living in a ski town!

 

Of course I have to work week days but weekends (and powder "sick" days biggrin.gif) are all skiing and now also snowmobiling and ski touring! I know I moved out here for the winters but like many people I met here have said, “People come for the Winters but stay for the Summers” and that is very true. I almost love Summer more than Winter here after picking up mountain biking and hiking etc. Mountain bike lunch rides on the trails right behind work with your co-workers are hard to beat!

 

It hasn't been without challenges though. It is quite hard to make good friends here as most people only come for a few months or a season and then leave. It can also get quite boring during the two slow months (one in spring and one in fall) during the transition between winter and summer sports when there are barely any people around.

 

Despite that though, I really can’t imagine living anywhere other than the mountains now.

 

Awesome! Glad everything is working out for you. I live just down the road in Vancouver and am always thinking of ways to transition my career up to Whistler full-time. Maybe once the wife is done her schooling it will be possible. Definitely my favourite place on earth. Sounds like you're taking full advantage with sledding, touring and mountain biking!

post #113 of 119

Jave, glad you are enjoying yourself and it all worked out with finding a good job as well.

post #114 of 119

Nice! Enjoy it ! 

post #115 of 119

Any openings at your company? I'm also in the IT field (healthcare), but the closest thing to skiing where I am is a 150ft vertical hill.

post #116 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jave View Post

 

I have a girlfriend of 5 years and a dog, that's it. Girlfriend is coming with me as well.

 

Making a decent profit on the home, probably enough to keep me living there without working for a couple years or so if I wanted to but don't really feel like blowing all my savings like that.

 

If you are ever going to do this in your lifetime, this is probably the best time to do it. Once you get a family and kids, moving around is real hard, plus you hopefully will have to pay for college woohoo! 

post #117 of 119
Very interesting read,glad you made it work I hope to retire to mountains some day some where!
post #118 of 119

You only live once, homie. You could get hit by a bus tomorrow, so follow your dreams.

post #119 of 119

good to hear things are working out for you....whistler/blackcomb and vancouver are pretty awesome places, eh?

(I'm also from Toronto originally (eglinton/bayview)...been here in vancouver bc 20 yrs this fall)...could do with less rain, however.

 

and  yes, the icefield parkway between banff and jasper (I adore both places) is well known as one of THE premiere mountain highways

 in the whole world...'tis like seeing 12 switzerlands each direction...esp if the weather is sunny even more jaw droppingly stunning

(and the ''animal jams'' of the mtn goats or bears or elk and harem taking up space on the road, stopping traffic, is pretty cool too biggrin.gif).

 

BC is a pretty amazing place...over 3/4 of the province sits above so many 1000 feet (can't recall what was the

number, however), as I once read (just look at a topography map)

...great sense of history with the railroad ('first spike', pierre berton)...wonderful mining history, first nations.

...some of the best skiing around, wonderful resorts, wineries (okanagan valley), hiking....kayaking or bicycle touring

 on the sunshine coast or islands on the coast....

 

then there is the amazing Oregon Calfiornia coastline you must one day check out too, to San Francisco...stunning ride!

..and other great areas to ski and visit too: alberta, oregon, washington state, colorado, idaho, montana etc.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jave View Post


 

 


I drove probably an average of 11 hours a day. One day I drove 14 I think... that was brutal. I didn't really get interesting until after Calgary though. We took a bit of a detour from Banff up to Jasper, that was the most amazing drive I've ever done and highly recommended. You can check out a slideshow of the pictures from our trip here:

 


 


Edited by canali - 1/23/13 at 2:30pm
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