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BED BUGS !!

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 

Jeez, every other time I turn on the news there's another story about bed bugs!  I'm afraid to go anywhere and stay in a hotel.  If those things hitch-hike in your luggage and you get them in your home, you'll have to spend thousands and a lot of inconvenience to get rid of them.  I heard some dumb reporter on TV say that, if you find that your room has bed bugs, you should ask for a different room.  Well, duuh.  And then if that room has bed bugs, what do you do?  Ask for a different hotel? a different town?  Call your travel agent, "can you get me a different country?  This one has bed bugs !"

 

I forgot to mention that I told an entomologist, "you're probably going to tell me that I'm wrong but cats spread bed bugs".  He said, "oh, I know they do; feral cats raid birds nests and get them that way and pet cats pick them up from an infested home."  The reason why I think cats spread bed bugs is because, one day a cat came into my garage and, when I tossed him out a bug fell out onto the driveway.  I stepped on it after looking closely at it, went on the Internet and got a couple of pictures of bed bugs and I'm pretty sure that's what it was.  I got rid of the Robin's nest (unoccupied at the time) in my patio.


Edited by Powderdog - 9/21/10 at 6:18pm
post #2 of 21

Powderdog,

 

I have first hand experience with this topic, and it isn't fun.  If you are an entomophobic kind of guy, do read on:

 

We had a great au pair from Sweden five years ago who brought along some unwelcome guests with her, likely picked up from a dorm bed in NYC where she trained for a week.  It cost us a few grand to get rid of the bugs that fortunately were discovered very early and never left her room, located on the far side of our house.

 

You can't get rid of bed bugs with RAID and normal spray...it does nothing.  The Internet remedies are worthless.  You have to call specialists in these critters immediately, and use their special poisons now that DDT is banned in the USA.   The only way you get rid of them is by poison, freezing or high heat.  Before the bug people come, bag everything in the infected area.  This means all clothing, suitcases, books, etc.   Then you buy a super-expensive mattress cover, wash all clothing normally and then dry using high heat, and keep the books, any clothing that can shrink, etc. in a bag for at least 13 months since these blood sucking bugs (that is all they eat) can live that long.  We had a new home at the time, so there were no cracks on the walls for the bugs to get into.  Older homes and hotel rooms are a bigger problem because these flat bugs can fit into the thinnest of cracks.

 

These bugs can easily jump into a suitcase from any hotel room and then they are in your home.  So what do your do?  First, ask the desk clerk if there have been any bugs in the hotel, and in what rooms.  I once walked out of an upscale NYC hotel when the clerk started to "forget" where they once sprayed.  Next, leave all your luggage by the door until you inspect the room.  The bugs typically live within 5 or 10 feet of their carbon dioxide exhaling prey, so look under the mattress, under the mattress pad, etc. for evidence.  Then it is safer to unpack.

 

If you really want to get scared, check out all the YOUTUBE videos. 

 

In the Days of Olde, the rich would move into a winter castle while the summer castles lay empty in the cold weather, which would freeze all the bedbugs.  That was then, and now we live in apartments, houses and hotel rooms.   I'll bet you are going to look under the mattress pad of your next hotel bed!  I know I do.


Edited by quant2325 - 9/20/10 at 3:01pm
post #3 of 21

Getting rid of bedbugs is really simple.  Just heat the effaced area to 140 degrees Fahrenheit. The hard part is removing everything else that can't handle 140 degrees like computers, TV,s etc,,

 

Last night a 7 year old neighbor was playing with our kids and then told them her house is infested, showed them bites, etc... DAMN, There goes the neighborhood!

 

It isn't a matter pf preventing them.  Unless you live in the Attic circle you will get them eventually.  Even buying a brand new pair of shoes from a respected retailer can bring them in.

 

Bedbugs invade Nike's NYC flagship store

 

Until someone invents a way to prevent them and deter them we are screwed!

 

post #4 of 21

I worry chronically that Old Boot's luggage will bring some home.  His work pays for a high standard hotel, but these days this just doesn't seem to matter.  When i travel with him I do all the checks and as an extra precaution I ask him to leave his luggage in his van for a day or two in our South Carolina heat (great for much of the year).  They sell packs that will heat your luggage to 120 core temp (you insert a thermometer into the core of your clothes), that i have considered purchasing for his luggage when he comes home to sit in the garage.  These are not cheap but several hundred cheaper then getting the bugs at home.  I have shown him what to look for; pull the head board off the wall is the number one peice of advice, and the bed side dresser drawers and look under them for the black dots that are actually bed bug feces, bed bugs, behind wall photos, the mattress box spring, and in wall outlets (a little trail of black dots to the wall outlet) are all spots to look.  I do these checks when I travel with him.  I also use bedbugregistry.com to check if the hotel he is going to stay at or anywhere near it has had reported bed bugs.  You will note if you check there that many of the Utah and Midvale hotels have reports there.  So use caution.

 

I have considered submitting a design for a patent for bedbug proof luggage.  Taped seams like ski wear i think would work!  Barring someone picking this idea up and making it, keep your luggage closed and away from the bed even if you find none.  Put it on the supplied luggage racks found in the closet away from the bed, and if you are worried, purchase Xtra large ziplocks and pack your clothes and personal items in them.  Keep them sealed while traveling when in a hotel room and they can not enter them.  If you pack your clothes inside these inside luggage you can steam your acutual luggage before bringing it into the house.  I don't go to that extreme if I checked and saw no signs or reason to worry, I do a thorough check.

 

Old Boot thinks I'm paranoid, that's because I am, but I'm the one that would do all the work to clean them up, he'd be off travelling again! 

post #5 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

Getting rid of bedbugs is really simple.  Just heat the effaced area to 140 degrees Fahrenheit. The hard part is removing everything else that can't handle 140 degrees like computers, TV,s etc,,

 

 

Sure, you can steam your luggage, your chairs, around the lightswitches, etc.  But the inside of your home isn't getting to 140F, and those little suckers go into the walls, under carpet and behind everything. 

  

Quote:

Originally Posted by lady_Salina View Post

 

Old Boot thinks I'm paranoid, that's because I am, but I'm the one that would do all the work to clean them up, he'd be off travelling again! 


A junk bond guy once told me, "He who panics first panics best.",   and he never had a bad year.  Assuming he is right, why not be paranoid? 

 

One of the few growth businesses I can think of in this economy is bedbug specialists, and those who breed bedbug smelling dogs.  My semi-retirement days are ending, so maybe I'll shell out $10,000 and buy a bedbug smelling Fido, pay some lowlife to infect every casino and hotel around the better skis areas,  and buy a few business cards.  The business would be operated as a one story whore house (no f#@$ing overhead), and put me closer to the slopes during the winter.  I could ski all day and kill some bugs at night.  Cool.  My marketing effort will consist of this YOUTUBE gem:

 


 


Edited by quant2325 - 9/20/10 at 2:26pm
post #6 of 21

So Sevin powder doesn't work on these little pests?

post #7 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpikeDog View Post

So Sevin powder doesn't work on these little pests?



They lay eggs that will hatch long after any powder wears off.  I'm not a pesticide guy or chemical engineer like you, and can't comment about Sevin powder, although a quick Internet check finds it approved for outdoor use only (we have little kids in our house).  I do know spraying once is not effective.  Our pesticide guy was very surprised we got rid of them in three applications (his firm has contracts with the big SF hotels), but we paniced and did everything right.   Our local Terminex guy didn't even want to touch them, and Terminex advertising suggests they kill bed bugs.  BTW, the best short reference I've seen on pesticides is this Wiki:

 

Pesticide resistance

With the widespread use of DDT in the 1940s and 1950s, bedbugs mostly disappeared from the developed world in the mid-20th century,[29] though infestations remained common in many other parts of the world.[17] Rebounding populations present a challenge because of developed resistance to various pesticides including DDT, and organophosphates. [30][31] Bed bug populations in Arkansas have been found to be highly resistant to DDT, with an LD50 of more than 100,000 PPM [32] DDT was seen to make bedbugs more active in studies done in Africa.[33]

Because some bedbug populations have developed a resistance to pyrethroid insecticides, there is growing interest in both synthetic pyrethroid and pyrrole insecticide chlorfenapyr; insect growth regulators such as hydroprene (Gentrol) are sometimes used.[28]

Tests show that the carbamate insecticide propoxur is highly toxic to bedbugs, but the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has been reluctant to approve such an indoor use because of its potential toxicity to children after chronic exposure.[34]

Bedbug pesticide-resistance appears to be increasing dramatically. Bedbug populations sampled across the U.S. showed a tolerance for pyrethroids several thousands of times greater than laboratory bedbugs.[35] New York City bed bugs have been found to be 264 times more resistant to deltamethrin than Florida bedbugs due to nerve cell mutations.[36] Another problem with current insecticide use is that the broad-spectrum insecticide sprays for cockroaches and ants that are no longer used had a collateral impact on bedbug infestations. Recently, a switch has been made to bait insecticides that have proven effective against cockroaches but have allowed bedbugs to escape the indirect treatment.[37]

A population genetics study of bed bugs in the United States, Canada, and Australia using a mitochondrial DNA marker found high levels of genetic variation. [38] This suggests that the studied bed bug populations did not undergo a genetic bottleneck as one would expect from insecticide control during the 1940s and 1950s, but instead, that populations may have been maintained on other hosts such as birds and bats. In contrast to the high amount of genetic variation observed with the mitochondrial DNA marker, no genetic variation in a nuclear rRNA marker was observed. This suggests increased gene flow of previously isolated bed bug populations, and given the absence of barriers to gene flow, the spread of insecticide resistance may be rapid.

[edit] Health effects


Edited by quant2325 - 9/20/10 at 3:09pm
post #8 of 21

DDT was a fantastic pesticide.  It almost rid the world of malaria. 

post #9 of 21


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by quant2325 View Post

My marketing effort will consist of this YOUTUBE gem:


The video mentioned bedbugs are attracted to carbon dioxide. Outdoor "mosquito magnet" devices operate on the principle of attracting blood sucking mosquitoes by emitting warm carbon dioxide and then sucking the sucker up. Wonder if they could be placed in an infested room to attract and get rid of bedbugs?

post #10 of 21

You really need to be thorough in your inspection.  I was in NYC for work and got upgraded to the top floor suite.  I put my luggage in the bathroom and inspected the room.  I found one between the sheet and comforter.  Took a video of if with my Blackberry.  I called the front desk four times before they sent someone up.  I had them move me to the other side of the hotel.  Needless to say I didn't sleep much that night.  I got home and posted a review on Tripadvisor.com and gave the room number and that fact I found the bedbug in the bed.  I checked the hotel reviews a few months after my visit and found a review from a guy who said he was bit by bedbugs in a suite on the same floor.  I am sure it was the same room based on the way management did nothing when I called.  I am pretty sure I got bit at a condo at a resort in Michigan this past winter, three bites in a row which is the telltale sign.  Luckily we never brought anything home.  Just writing this makes me itch.

post #11 of 21

I hate you guys...seriously i can't stop itching now...good thing I work in NYC 50% of the time..man i'm screwed

post #12 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xtremity View Post

I hate you guys...seriously i can't stop itching now...good thing I work in NYC 50% of the time..man i'm screwed



Here you go:  http://www.wpix.com/news/local/wpix-bed-bugs-on-the-rise,0,2726280.story    

post #13 of 21



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SpikeDog View Post

DDT was a fantastic pesticide.  It almost rid the world of malaria. 


Still is a fantastic pesticide if we were allowed to use it.

 


fwiw:       http://www.junkscience.com/ddtfaq.html

 

post #14 of 21


LOL, actually the newest effective treatement is taking in heaters and blowers, sealing off the house and blowing the heat into everywhere.  It actually take 120 degress to kill them, but they heat to 140 to be sure to get all hiding areas to 120.  Home owners must remove candles and other low heat senstive products that may be melted or dammage but the heat treatment is highly effective, non toxic, and kills all the eggs also so that one treatement, done properly tends to work.  It's very expensive, $2000.00 to treat a one story home.  I'm sure that price will come down. Chemical treatments often end up costing as much as they take so many treatments. 

 

BTW, I know a little about this as my mother is a property manager in canada and it is a night mare for apartment buildings in cities right now to find answers to this problem.  Her building actually sends people to apartments of propective renters to check their existing dwelling for bed bugs before allowing them to move in.  They employ two fulltime specialists now that does all the owned buildings by the management firm.  They pay for steaming, chemicals, removal of matresses, furniture etc in units that happy to get them if the regular treatments don't work within 3 weeks.  The people have to pay to replace all their items, carpet etc.  They have to treat apartments above and below and beside any infected unit and yet these hotels do a quick room treatement and think they'll get it?

 

This problem is just beginning to grow and I'm glad I had a heads up on it from my mother 2 years ago and started to diligently check.  In that time we have only found a bed bug once, my mother actually found it in Ceasar's Cassion hotel in Atlantic City.  That makes sense with what we know now of that area and New York. 

 

Robin (Old Boot), is a Service enginer for a burner mfg, says he is going to design a nice burner system to take care of them and get his cut of profits also!  If he does the burners and I do the luggage we should do okay... too bad I really don't think either of us will take the time to.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by quant2325 View Post




A junk bond guy once told me, "He who panics first panics best.",   and he never had a bad year.  Assuming he is right, why not be paranoid? 

 

One of the few growth businesses I can think of in this economy is bedbug specialists, and those who breed bedbug smelling dogs.  My semi-retirement days are ending, so maybe I'll shell out $10,000 and buy a bedbug smelling Fido, pay some lowlife to infect every casino and hotel around the better skis areas,  and buy a few business cards.  The business would be operated as a one story whore house (no f#@$ing overhead), and put me closer to the slopes during the winter.  I could ski all day and kill some bugs at night.  Cool.  My marketing effort will consist of this YOUTUBE gem:

 


 

post #15 of 21

What about the bed bug Insecticide called Bedlam? Does it work? Would it be worth the effort to buy some for use in hotel rooms?

post #16 of 21

This is just great.  I stay in Hotels 4-5 nights a week.  I'm doomed. 

post #17 of 21

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Xtremity View Post

I hate you guys...seriously i can't stop itching now...good thing I work in NYC 50% of the time..man i'm screwed


Hahaha! Some of us LIVE in NYC 100% of the time! " class="bbcode_smiley" height="1" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies//smile.gif" title=":)" width="1" />

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by quant2325 View Post

In the Days of Olde, the rich would move into a winter castle while the summer castles lay empty in the cold weather, which would freeze all the bedbugs.  

 

But how do they get rid of the bedbugs from their WINTER castle???


 

post #18 of 21

I just returned from a business trip to New Jersey and spent a week at the Days Inn Newark Airport. Not a bed bug in site. I left my stuff in the bathtub and turned  the nicely made bed upside down and inside out. Also looked along edge of carpet, chairs. curtains, everywhere and anywhere. even brought a flashlight. Nuttin. Not a bite, scratch, mark, itch, rash, etc. While I do think there is a bed bug problem that has reappeared, as with everything else the press gets a hold of its been blown out of proportion IMHO.

 

post #19 of 21

>as with everything else the press gets a hold of its been blown out of proportion IMHO

That's a yes and no.

When the Nike store in NYC closes there is some kind of problem.

http://www.businessweek.com/ap/financialnews/D9IB91S00.htm

I just stayed at a small hotel(nice) on the beach in Sanibel, Florida, and reading the reviews on TripAdvisor there were a number of bed bug complaints.  But we saw no signs.

post #20 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by SnowbirdDevotee View Post

>as with everything else the press gets a hold of its been blown out of proportion IMHO

That's a yes and no.

When the Nike store in NYC closes there is some kind of problem.


So what?

 

There're stores that have roach problem, ant problem, or mice problem etc. They just don't advertise about the problem. No one knows how many stores are closing for "renovation" to get rid of whatever that is.

 

I once stayed in a hotel in Florida and brought some flees home! It took some doing to get ride of them suckers!!! I also took some roaches home from (I suspect) some Chinese take out one time! Talk about disgusting pests!!! Took months to move them out.:(
 

post #21 of 21

Still not as bad as the giardia I took home with the cold cuts from a delicatessen.

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