or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Do you ski with goggles, sunglasses or nothing at all? I HATE FOGGING!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Do you ski with goggles, sunglasses or nothing at all? I HATE FOGGING!

post #1 of 32
Thread Starter 

So I'm getting prepped for the new season, and looking at some goggles.  No matter what I try, cat crap, soap, any of that stuff, they ALWAYS fog up on me.  I'm tired of it!   So, I wonder if I should try and wear some lightweight polarized sunglasses, or something of the like.  When they're blowing snow, you need something over your eyes.

 

Ideas for fog free goggles?  Sunglasses maybe?

 

Thanks!

Nick

post #2 of 32

I experienced snowblindness when I was 5, and liked it so much that I've skied without goggles or sunglasses ever since. These braille keyboards are incredible! 

post #3 of 32

you need better googles or to take better care of them.

 

mine almost never fog outside of extreme conditions.

 

do you dry them out every night?

 

do you dress so your warm but dont sweat?

 

do you wear a hat? putting your goggle on your forehead while wearing a hat is a great way to fog goggles. helmets stop you from fogging.

 

sunglass sucks on so many levels IMO. 

post #4 of 32

I have worn my prescription Oakley Flak Jacket XLJ with the Black Iridium polarized lenses at Whiteface the last three years. They haven't fogged as much as I thought they would but when it has been very cold or windy my eyes have bothered me. Skiing through snowmaking has led to icing problems that were difficult to deal with. I decided to get the Smith TurboFan OTG for this season but can't speak to how they will work. A ski instructor friend at Whiteface swears by them.

post #5 of 32

Find out what they're using over at Whitefish and get yourself a pair of those.

post #6 of 32

GOGGLES

post #7 of 32

Do you wear a scarf or bandana over your face?  I notice if I do and its too tight my breath goes up and fogs my goggles.

post #8 of 32

uvex makes some goggles with fans in em, but theyre not cheap, i got a pair of  uvex goggles off ebay for dirt cheap, never had a problem since i switched to a helmet, just look for double lens with anti fog ect ect, ive skied  with oakley half jackets on very warm spring days but if your not moovin theyre foggin, goggles are simply the best way to go

post #9 of 32
Thread Starter 

I prefer goggles too.  I do wear a helmet, and most of the time I wear either a neoprene "batman" mask or a turtle fur neck/face warmer.   I have a pair of arenettes with mirror tint, and a pair of smiths that are orange.    I'm going to look into oakley's I think.  I have a bunch of thier stuff already, and it's great build quality..

post #10 of 32

What else are you wearing at the same time?

 

Are you rubbing the inside of the lens?  You can't.  Once you do that, the factory coating is wrecked and you'll have to get those fog cloths to restore some semblance of fog free, but see first question.

 

How much do YOU sweat when you ski?

 

I ski at Whitefish (see above).  I don't use expensive goggles, being a CHEAPSKATE.  I don't really have a goggle fogging problem unless I do the stupid thing on a frigid day of bending over to buckle a boot and exhaling into the goggle somehow.  Then the goggle is unable to dissipate the mist before it can handle the condensation and it freezes and you're done for.  Most of the factory coating work the same way I think.  They prevent the tiny drops from being tiny, force them to flow together into big drops which sort of roll down and away before they freeze.  At least, I think that is what happens.  When it's super cold, everything happens SO FAST


ZAP.  That the fog freezes before this process takes place.  All those double lenses and fans, etc. are trying to provide extra time for the mist to turn to bigger particles, etc.  Now, if you block the vents with face masks, you're preventing air from passing across your lens inside and helping to get rid of humidity in there.  So, you might need just a little gaper gap up top and below to help this happen better.  Your face mask below might be blocking the bottom vents.  Or you may be really sweaty.  OR

 

....   You might also have broken the seal between the two lenses of a double lensed set of goggles.  I had this happen on a new set of goggles in the middle of their first season.  I could not get TO the darn fog!  It was in between the lenses.  I can't find where the seal problem is or anything, the seal looks good, but I can't use those darn goggles on super cold days.  The tiny bit of vapor seems to be in there to stay. 

post #11 of 32

Smith turbofans are the best to prevent fogging.

post #12 of 32

I have a pair of Smith goggles with a fan , which really works . I've tried other ways to avoid fogging with absolutely no luck .

post #13 of 32

Agree with BinPA. 

 

Keeping goggles fog free is more prevention rather than active water vapor removal.

The worst culprit is dressing too warm and/or skiing too hard.

 

Regulate core temperature by bringing and/or ditching extra layers in a backpack / boot bag in the base lodge to match clothes with temp.

Don't forget pit-zips - blow down a groomer with both pit-zips and front zipper open will cool you down in no time flat.

  

No sweat skiing - Learn to ski more efficiently - groom, bump & off piste. Lessons will help here.     

post #14 of 32

GOGGLES- it is the only way.  Good high-end goggles almost never fog (spherical Oakley, Smith, Zeal. etc). Smith I/O has a reputation or a particularly "drafty" google, so they are almost guaranteed to be fog free.  Of course TurboFan Smith are going to be fog-free for sure.   Helmet helps too (see BinPA's post).  

 

Skiing without goggles or sunglasses is plain stupid (yeah, I can be blunt), try to ski at any decent speed through falling snow and you will appreciate what I just said.  Sunglasses work to a first degree, but they do suck on many levels- they tend to ice up, they get filled with snow if you fall, and they can be a trauma hazard if you fall on them.  Leave them for apre-ski and get a good pair of goggles.    If ou ABSOLUTELY hate goggles, look into glacier sunglasses, yes, those funky glasses with leather side shields, they work to some extent on a nice sunny day.  I always wear goggles on skis though. 

 

 

Alex

 

P.S. Maybe Phil can sell you his dog-approved goggles...

post #15 of 32

Cheap smith goggles never gave me a problem except with freezing precip. I'm pretty sure thats true with any goggle. God I even wear a hat..... Wear googles during the winter, come spring it's cheap sunglasses.

post #16 of 32

Nick,

 

I too suffered fogged goggles for many years until I solved the underlying problem.   Goggles don't fog up because of the goggles themselves but rather because of the moisture that invades them - so keep the moisture out as best you can.

 

1) {Best Trick!}  Put an oil-based sun cream on your face before the goggles.  Make sure to apply it in and around the eyebrows, forehead and beneath (and around) the eyes as well as the bridge of the nose.  Use one that doesn't run with sweat!  Thick Vitamin-E oil does really well too.  These products keep the moisture IN your face instead of having it go into your goggles.

 

2) Don't wear your goggles on (or above) your forehead even for short periods.  Lots of moisture will migrate through both hair and hat right into the lenses.  If on a helmet make sure it seals reasonably well against the helmet to keep snow out.

 

3) Don't 'wash them out' with snow or water as it will get into the foam and provide a nice steady supply of water vapor for an hour or more.

 

4) Don't wear any sort of face-mask under the edge of the goggles.  Doing so permits your warm, moist breath to migrate through the material into the goggles and condense on the lens.  Remember, warm air rises - so any kind of cover over your mouth/nose will likely cause moisture to find its way into the goggles.  Use something that takes an exhale away from the goggles (to the sides, or downward).

 

 

I've recently had cause to wear protective goggles under the house (fixing insulation, etc) and they fogged up a lot despite the downward venting of my respirator.  Used Vitamin-E oil to great effect but the goggles had many side-holes for ventilation (ironically, to prevent fogging) which permits exhales and even body heat (quite warm in protective gear) to rise up and enter the goggles.  Duct tape over the venting holes did wonders.

 

 

Even in our wet PNW climate I rarely have difficulty with fogging goggles any more, regardless what brand.  Find where the moisture is coming from and prevent it's access to the inner lens and you'll be far better off than trying to de-fog the lens after it's already in there.  Despite what goggle makers claim, there is no material that by itself will prevent fogging if moisture gets in there and isn't removed.

 

.ma

post #17 of 32
Thread Starter 

Wow everyone..   Thanks for all the replies!   I actually ordered a new pair of custom Oakley A-Frames for this year (and hopefully many more with proper care.)  I like hte fact they have additional vents on the face, which is sure to help when the actual skiing takes place.   I was due for a new pair anyway, and if these bad boy's do the trick, I may grab another pair with mirrored/polrized lenses for those bright bright days.

 

Now, I guess another part of th fog free world, is the face covering..  What do you guys use for that.   I'm sure what I'm using has some contribution to the fog issue.

 

TIA

post #18 of 32

I used some Bolle OTG goggles for about 10 years and only once or twice had any problems with fogging.  They finally needed to be replaced and I got Smith Knowledge OTG goggles and have had a mountain of trouble ever since.  The goggles don't fog but my glasses do.  I really think the problem is the coating on the lenses but of course the optical shop blames it on the goggles.  The first time I used them was at Big Sky two years ago in early December when the temp dropped to about zero at the base.  I had to ski down without any protection for my eyes and a large part of my face.  It was not a pleasant experience.  Last year I used my Bolle sunglasses with interchangeable lenses quite often and they worked well but I need goggles that work this season.  I got a special cloth from Smith last year that is used to clean the lenses in the glasses and it helps some but does not eliminate the problem.  I guess I will be trying other brands this season.

post #19 of 32

I have Uvex Double lens supravision super anti-fog climazone.  Doesn't say "OTG" on them but I think they are (have the indent in the foam padding for the glasses arms, fit over my galsses. 

 

Problem is my glasses fog up.  Not dressing too warm helps.

 

I'm thinking about getting the fan-included goggles mentioned above.

post #20 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post

you need better googles or to take better care of them.

 

mine almost never fog outside of extreme conditions.

 

do you dry them out every night?

 

do you dress so your warm but dont sweat?

 

do you wear a hat? putting your goggle on your forehead while wearing a hat is a great way to fog goggles. helmets stop you from fogging.

 

sunglass sucks on so many levels IMO. 



This is all that needs to be said on the subject.

post #21 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post

I used some Bolle OTG goggles for about 10 years and only once or twice had any problems with fogging.  They finally needed to be replaced and I got Smith Knowledge OTG goggles and have had a mountain of trouble ever since.  The goggles don't fog but my glasses do.  I really think the problem is the coating on the lenses but of course the optical shop blames it on the goggles.  The first time I used them was at Big Sky two years ago in early December when the temp dropped to about zero at the base.  I had to ski down without any protection for my eyes and a large part of my face.  It was not a pleasant experience.  Last year I used my Bolle sunglasses with interchangeable lenses quite often and they worked well but I need goggles that work this season.  I got a special cloth from Smith last year that is used to clean the lenses in the glasses and it helps some but does not eliminate the problem.  I guess I will be trying other brands this season.


You really gotta coat your eyeglass lenses with the cloth. I used the Knowledge frame last season, and I only really had fogging problems when 1) eyebrow sweat hit eyeglasses 2) didn't give them a good wipe down with the anti-fog cloth. 

 

Maybe try a turbo fan this year? That should suck the moisture right off your eyeglass lenses.

post #22 of 32

Goggles

post #23 of 32

I ski with goggles most of the time, except for really warm spring days when they get too hot and I'll wear sunglasses.  I was having a problem with fogging when my old helmet would block the vents on the top of the goggles, so when it came time to replace that helmet, I made sure to get one that matched with my goggles and didn't block the vents.  It's a Smith helmet with channels to allow hot, moist air to escape from the top of the goggles.  Seems to work, I didn't have any problems with it last season, even on really cold days. 

post #24 of 32

#1 Keep them dry and don't let the foam get wet.

 

#2 Dress approrpairely.  Dont over dress and get all sweaty. Wear technial winer clothes with good breathability, pit zips, side of leg zips, etc...

 

#3 Keep the inside of the goggle warm. The best way to do this is to keep the goggle on your face. Do not take them off to air them out on the chair lift.

 

#4 Keep the vents open. Don't cover the foam wiht your hat / balavclava, this will restrict venting warm humid air from the goggle.

 

#5 Carry spares. Some times your goggles will get waterlogged, head plant in deep snow, over dressed in humid weather, water dripping on you from somewhere. There is nothing you can do to fix the situation quickly at this point. What is required is warmth and time to let them dry out on their own. Keep a spare pair in your pack or in the car.


 

post #25 of 32

Goggles.  The worst foggers being Oakley A-Frames.  I've been using Smith Prodigy and Phenoms the last few years, and they fog in a unique way.  I forget which is which, but one of them fogs from the bottom up every time, and the other fogs from the top down every time.  It's definately accelerated by wearing a face mask or putting them on my head.  Helmets do help.

 

The best anti-fog goggle I've used to date is the trusty Dragon DX.  In fact if I find a pair in colors I like I may go back to those this year.  The only issues with them was freezing in certain foggy North Idaho conditions.

post #26 of 32

What BWPA said about drying them out at night, don't leave them in gear bags or pockets, the moisture will build up between the lenses and then you are f''d.

 

go for the turbos' great especially when doing a lot of stop and go skiing.

post #27 of 32

Carrera Kimerik cleared all fog issues for me last winter.

post #28 of 32

I use sun glasses.

 

CAT CRAP GREAT ANTI-FOG

post #29 of 32

The Pinch:

 

http://www.pinchoriginal.com/index.php?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage.tpl&product_id=7&category_id=14&option=com_virtuemart&Itemid=12

 

Antifog.   Without any  scrounging about in the litter box, looking for tinnable bits. 

post #30 of 32

Sunglasses. Cheap and big and polarized. I wear glasses and my eyes are always either tearing or sweating causing my glasses to fog. Got 3 pr for $10 once at a flea market but Walgreens usually has them for $24. I do need to get some goggles though as there is powder skiing in my future.

 

87557700028_450x450_a.jpg

 

 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Do you ski with goggles, sunglasses or nothing at all? I HATE FOGGING!