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Welp... After paying $39 a pair for ski tunes each year, I've broken down...

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

If you have multiple pairs of skis in your quiver, or even multiple skiers with multiple ski quivers (me) in your family, you feel your wallet get a bit light come ski tune time at the shop.   Having a 5 ski quiver here at the house adds up to somewhere in the $200 range each season.    Not that I'm a cheapo or something, I don't mind spending it, because the shop we go to is probably the nicest shop within a 100 mile radius.

 

BUT......

 

I love working with my hands...   I'm an electrician, and hoestly, a bit of a toy/tool whore.  I'm 99.9956374% sure I would enjoy doing some of the basic tunes myself, if not all of them.  I'm no ski tuning pro, and I'll probably read 3 or 4 publications on tuning before I got at it with my $1000+/pr sets of skis.   I have a few pairs of rock skis around that I'll play with prior to hitting up the high end pairs. 

 

So, I'm midway building a little ski tune setup in my shop.   I have some extra space that I repurposed for a bike/ski shop.  I bought vises, a dial adjustable base/edge tuner, and a dakine iron. 

 

So the next question is:

 

**What else should I add to the tool chest? 

 

Please keep in mind, I have a fully function 1700sqft shop detached from the house, filled to the roof with tools galore.  I'm just looking for the ski specific stuff.

 

TIA!

Nick

post #2 of 11

Diamond stones to maintain the edges (don't file often.)

Plastic scraper to scrape off the wax.

2-3 Brushes to brush the wax (brass, horsehair, nylon)

Paint brush to brush off loose wax between scrape and brush phases.

Another steel brush dedicated to cleaning the bases.

 

http://www.epicski.com/wiki/tuning-skis-please-explain

post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 

Very nice write up over there.   I'll be printing that out...  I see a 3 diamond stone kit, shoudl I purchase something along those lines, or a better specific single stone?

post #4 of 11



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post

Diamond stones to maintain the edges (don't file often.)

Plastic scraper to scrape off the wax.

2-3 Brushes to brush the wax (brass, horsehair, nylon)

Paint brush to brush off loose wax between scrape and brush phases.

Another steel brush dedicated to cleaning the bases.

 

http://www.epicski.com/wiki/tuning-skis-please-explain



I'd also add a wire brush to clean out files or whatever (you likely have one already), a gummy stone to clean off a spot of rust or dull tips & tail if you decide to do so, an Arkansas stone, a true bar, a paint scraper to scrape the damn wax off your workbench or the floor, some denatured alcohol (a 50%-50% solution with water will keep those stones in good shape despite the NY humidity), some P-Tex (you can buy a lifetime supply in clear and black for a few bucks), a metal scraper, a cork or Scotch Brite pad, and whatever else Alpinord, SierraJim or Atomicman suggest, since they are the gurus.  I've purchased from SlideWright before, and they gave me good advise with what to buy.  You won't be filing much once the base edge is set (and it may come the way you want it).  Once the side edge is set, routine maintenance simply consists of using your diamond stones.  Depending upon the wax you use, a mask may be in order (fluro isn't necessary for recreational skiing). 

 

Your payback will be in less than a year, and you will have the satisfaction of doing the job right.  Don't forget to go to the ski manufacturer websites and check out their recommended base and side edge bevels.


Edited by quant2325 - 9/15/10 at 5:42pm
post #5 of 11

3 diamonds is good.  A coarse one to knock off the burrs, a medium one and a fine one.

 

My normal quick tune is just diamond stoning the side edges,  wax on, wax off.   Once in a while I file the side edges.   If I find something really dinged on a base edge I might try to knock it down with a coarse stone, but you really want to leave the base edges alone.  Every time you file or stone them you increase the base edge bevel, thus tilting the base edge up and away from the snow.  This is a critical angle in a skis geometry and should not get above 1 degree.

 

If you increase your side edge bevel too much you can file it and start over.  If you increase your base edge bevel you need to get a stone grind to bring the base edge back.

post #6 of 11

Here is my list along with other tuning info:
 

http://www.racewax.com/category/tuning-tips.essential-equipment-list/

 

Enjoy!

post #7 of 11

First, Slidewright is great, good prices for Supporters and have great wax.   I use Universal most of the time, unless it is really cold then put on some Cold/Green wax-both are from Slidewright.

 

Also metal brush get a stainless steel one (no rust) to clean the wax out of your Horsehair brush when structuring your wax.

 

Also have a card file cleaner.   If you are a tool guy you know what I mean.  When skis are cleaner and de-waxed use card file cleaner to restructure the base, easy, works quick and good.

 

I use an approximately 4"x6" metal aluminum flat piece that I use when doing Ptex work over the ski so I don't drip Ptex everywhere just on the spot that needs it or the metal plate not the floor etc.

 

Cheap hair dryer to warm part of base that I need to Ptex, a warm base will accept Ptex better than a cold base, especially important along the edges.

 

Med grit sandpaper to sharpen your plastic wax scraper. Just put on table/bench and hold plastic scraper at 90 degrees and sharpen.  Have at least 2 plastic scraper and save one for the final wax off movements.

 

I have a magniying glass to see into any med or deep gouges, looking for dirt, wax etc. that I don't want in there when repair is done.

\

You may also need brake hold downs, depending on your vise setup.

 

Also save CLEAN washclothes for wiping off excess wax etc.

 

WF40 with shaving brush and washcloth for Top of ski, binding etc.

 

Enjoy,  the most fun is getting out in the shop in October and getting everything ready, sure adds to the anticipation.

post #8 of 11

I find that at least in the east, doing the base bevels periodically is needed. The base bevels can be sharpened without changing the angle. I use the tool from Sun Valley 'The Final Cut". After a full year of skiing and maybe a dozen sharpenings, I had the base bevels checked by Graham Loneto in Stowe, a former WC tech for US Ski team in the Olymics and he measured with an outlandish giant meter and then pronounced me a good tech as I had not changed the bevels. However, with a multi-use adjustable guide, stay away from the base bevels. If you find you like tuning, a set of fixed file guides would be my recommendation, in addition to a couple of metal brushes, stiff brass, soft brass and stiff steel. I found that they really make a difference in both ease and the finished product.

post #9 of 11

vsirin, are you using a file or stones on your base edge work?  Very interesting that it was measured as having not increased the bevel.  Certainly if we use a good, wide fixed guide correctly you'd think it wouldn't, but conventional wisdom keeps telling us it would.

post #10 of 11

Tuning for family or mega quiver?   Roto brushes.  Get a 20cm shaft to mount two brushes

(also to mount 20cm brushes for snowboards).  Slidewright has some good roto packages,

a brass/horsehair/nylon combo is good.  And though they are not a sponser, Artech is

a great Vermont supply shop.

post #11 of 11

I did not need to use a metal file. I used diamond stones (black, red, yellow, white Moonflex (I forget the numbers but coarse med, fine))  and, for races, a set of SVST polishing stones in addition.

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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs › Welp... After paying $39 a pair for ski tunes each year, I've broken down...