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Newbie wanting some advice.

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

Hello,

 

My name is Nate, I'm historically from Missouri, but I love skiing. I'm attending college at CSM in Golden, CO and I REALLY want to go skiing. However I figure since I'll be here for the next at least four years it would be a decent investment to get a pair of good skis.


That being said, I'm on somewhat of a budget, so I hopped on Craigslist and eBay looking for deals, and quickly realized I have no idea what a deal is, or even what I want. 

I'm a decent skiier at best, the biggest place I've ever been is Winter Park and I did a black diamond or three. I'm 6'5" 165# size 13 shoes so I probably need a longer pair of skis and bigger bindings. 

 

I have a helmet and goggles (Giro and Smith respectively) and clothes, but what would you recommend for an intermediate level set of skis, bindings, boots and poles for a tall guy on somewhat of a budget? I'd like to keep the whole purchase under $500 if possible. 


I saw this pair on Craigslist:

http://denver.craigslist.org/spo/1945383613.html

 

and it looks to be a good deal from my research, but I don't know anything at all about skis. I got the Colorado Pass so I'm planning on spending lots of time at Breckenridge and Keystone and A Basin later in the season. 

 

What do you think? 

post #2 of 16

Invest in boots and that means going to a reputable shop, with a qualified boot fitter. Once you have boots, check out some ski swaps for good used equipment.

post #3 of 16

You're on the right track in terms of skis (high 80's to mid 90's, all purpose and moderate flex), but those Sollies are too short for you and too pricey. Better idea is to invest in good boots, get them fitted well, rent skis for a while until you learn what and where you like to ski. Real shops near the slope will tend to have demos at good prices, once you figure it out, or you can apply rental fees toward buying, or you can wait for end of season sales, or you can haunt overstock places online. This is a bad time to try to buy skis, incidentally. Growing demand, weakening supply of bargins.

post #4 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post

You're on the right track in terms of skis (high 80's to mid 90's, all purpose and moderate flex), but those Sollies are too short for you and too pricey. Better idea is to invest in good boots, get them fitted well, rent skis for a while until you learn what and where you like to ski. Real shops near the slope will tend to have demos at good prices, once you figure it out, or you can apply rental fees toward buying, or you can wait for end of season sales, or you can haunt overstock places online. This is a bad time to try to buy skis, incidentally. Growing demand, weakening supply of bargins.



Totally.  BUT, I think there are still some screaming deals, especially on used stuff for another month or so.  However, I don't think the OP should go out and try to find such a deal.  At this point, it sounds like he has no clue what he likes, so I agree- just rent, at least a handful of times till you know what feels good and what doesnt.

post #5 of 16
Thread Starter 

I'm just looking for a good powder or general purpose set of skis. Nothing for the terrain park or for backcountry, but just general blues and the occasional black and the occasional double black if I get bored/a death wish. 

 

What brands/models of boots would you recommend? Remember BIG and wide. I'm not picky on arch support, I don't pronate or anything. 

 

 

High 80s to mid 90s? Is that the width? Also are there units on flex or like a rating scale? I'm a complete newbie when it comes to this stuff. 
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post

You're on the right track in terms of skis (high 80's to mid 90's, all purpose and moderate flex), but those Sollies are too short for you and too pricey. Better idea is to invest in good boots, get them fitted well, rent skis for a while until you learn what and where you like to ski. Real shops near the slope will tend to have demos at good prices, once you figure it out, or you can apply rental fees toward buying, or you can wait for end of season sales, or you can haunt overstock places online. This is a bad time to try to buy skis, incidentally. Growing demand, weakening supply of bargins.

post #6 of 16

I agree with Robin and Beyond.  Spend all of your money on boots and an excellent bootfitter.  Then, rent demos until you find what works best for you.

 

I researched custom boot alignment at length about a year and a half ago.  We go to Aspen-Snowmass a lot, so I was focused on that geographic area.  If you are inclined to make the trip, I would recommend that you set an appointment with Jim Lindsay at BOOTech (www.bootech.net).  Jim can make you a custom orthotic for inside the boot, and align your boots properly so that the fit and alignment are perfect.  Boots should last you at least 100 ski days, and Jim's orthotics will last through 3-4 pairs of boots.  He sells high-end boots in his shop at Aspen-Highlands, or will work with outside boots you bring in.  You should definitely visit with him before you buy, though, as different boot manufacturers make boots that are better for different types of bodies/feet.

 

Good luck!

post #7 of 16

Good fitting boots is the way to go.

 

Look for a good boot fitter at the mountain you plan to ski – so after the initial fitting, you can still run in for quick adjustments and immediate test & feedback.

post #8 of 16

I don't know much about alpine boots, but if I remember right, Nordicas fit wider feet pretty well.  When they say 80 to 90s, yes, that is the ski waist width.  Look for something with dimensions of about 128-90-110 and it will probably be a good do anything ski.  Look for something like the Fischer Watea 84.  At your height, I would get something around 185 cm long, as it will work well even after you get better and start skiing faster and in deeper powder.  You could go with something more like 179 if you want it to be easier to turn, but you will definitely outgrow that length after a year or two of skiing.

post #9 of 16
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the help. I've been busy with classes and unable to reply.

 

Is there a numbering system for boot measurement to binding size? Like will size 13 boots only fit on a certain length of binding size or are they pretty universal? From past ski-renting experience I've seen the techs adjust the bindings to the boot. 


Also what about the snap-out tension, or whatever the adjustment that keeps you in the binding or lets you fall out is called? How do you adjust that and what is a good intermediate range? 

post #10 of 16

The boot sole length, expressed in millimeters, will determine the placement/mounting of the bindings. Many skis today use what's called a 'system' binding that slides onto a rail mounted in the ski, they can be adjusted to fit different boots. 'Flat' skis will have the bindings mounted with screws that are drilled into the ski, they can be adjusted but it's obviously more difficult as they have to be removed and re-drilled.

 

The DIN setting governs the release of the boot from the binding, there are numerous charts out there to determine your setting is based on weight and skiing style. For the moment its best to let a good shop handle this, as an incorrect setting can cause serious problems, but the adjustment is made via screws on the toe and heel pieces of the binding.

 

The width of the ski is something you'll have to decide for yourself. The trend is toward wider and wider gear, 10 years ago 80mm was really wide, now its basically the jumping off point. I'll second the advice above regarding proper boot fit, very important.

 

 

post #11 of 16

Since you're in Golden go by powder7.com sometime. They're mainly an online store, but have a showroom in Golden and have a lot of new and used/demo skis. You can drop in and look at them up close and discuss different options with the folks there whether you end up buying from them or not.

 

The other folks are right though - focus on getting your boots right first! There's a bootfitter named Greg Hoffman who works on the mountain at Vail. The idea of someone making adjustments and then you ski some runs and he makes more adjustments makes a lot of sense to me. There's some info here ... http://skibootfitters.com/oldsite/shops/west_CO_Vail_GMOL.htm

 

Have fun, and good luck!  ;-)

 

post #12 of 16

Boots first. If your feet are not happy, you won't be having fun either.

 

Best deals are to be had on here or TGR rather than ebay/CL

post #13 of 16
Thread Starter 

Woot. I'm going boot shopping tonight. I brought a couple pairs of Smartwool ski socks too. 

 

I also checked out Powder7 today at the Ski Blitz event we had at school in the ballrooms, they have some nice stuff. :) 

post #14 of 16
Thread Starter 

Okay, well school has been kicking my butt but I've managed to join the ski team and go to a ski swap and nab a pair of nice Nordica boots.

 

I've also discovered that the school's team competes in slalom and GS events. What kind of skis would you recommend for those two? I'm looking at getting probably two or three pairs, probably just one for slalom, one for GS, and maybe one for just downhill or powder. 

 

What brands/sizes do you recommend?

 

Also, what's the scoop on bindings? What features should I look for/avoid? 

post #15 of 16

Good thing you posted this here and not on TGR (trust me). Haha. As said above, boots boots boots. I wouldn't worry about purchasing skis until you do that. Demo some skis for a while. You can try out TONS of skis over the season to see what you enjoy the most. You won't have any regrets going that route. Have a fantastic ski season, and enjoy CO!

post #16 of 16

Quote:

Originally Posted by charbie92 View Post

Okay, well school has been kicking my butt but I've managed to join the ski team and go to a ski swap and nab a pair of nice Nordica boots.

 

I've also discovered that the school's team competes in slalom and GS events. What kind of skis would you recommend for those two? I'm looking at getting probably two or three pairs, probably just one for slalom, one for GS, and maybe one for just downhill or powder. 

 

What brands/sizes do you recommend?

 

Also, what's the scoop on bindings? What features should I look for/avoid? 

 

 

Wow, you started out on your OP on a budget looking for one pair of intermediate to advanced skis and now you've joined your school's ski team! Slow down future Olympian...sent you a Private Message to help you get focused.

 

As many recommended, glad to see you picked up boots first. Hopefully the Force was with you at the ski swap.

 

SkiBootJedi

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