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Bus schedules in Italy

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

Hi -- I'm trying to sort out a trip to Trentino based in Trento -- that is, if  Trento is a good central spot to be. I can't seem to find an online bus schedule site for the Italian buses in that region -- only trains, and trains don't service places like Canazei. Any help?

post #2 of 10
post #3 of 10

Hello Cloudcult, and welcome to Epicski.

What kind of terrain, mainly, do you have in mind to ski? groomed or un-gromed? Difficulty? kind of snow do you expect?

Crowds? Scenery?

 

Mmmmhhh, Trento is a quaint midsize town (for Italian sizes that is). It's the province (county) capital of Trentino.

You'd have nearly direct access to Fai della Paganella skiing Area and to Monte Bondone.

Folgaria, Madonna di Campiglio and Canazei will be a bit farther away,

The bus schedule may vary w/ the winter season.

The other possibilty would be to select he other province and base yourself in Bolzano/Bozen. butthe you'd be more Dolomiti superski area oriented...

But to be based so down the valley from where the actual skiing fileds are, could take away quite a big chunk of your day time...

Not that I'm dissing your idea, but unless you expressly want to stay in a mid sized town, and are prepared to forego time (or wake up very early) to have thus in exchange more choices of skiing areas, to look for a place to stay in towns like Predazzo (just to name one).

If a town is the base requirement, you could alos look for Aosta (on the other side of the Alps arc, near the french border) , comparable size to Trento and Bolzano, but with a cable car linking directly the town to Pila's skiing area. then buses departing from Aosta, could connect you to other places like Courmayeur, La Thule, etc.

 

 

P.S.Prickly, both sites don't seem to work well, maybe they're undergoing some maintenance...

Try also www.sad.it (it's from Bolazno, though). But in any case, the search engines accept a day/month date up to Dec 11th....

post #4 of 10
Thread Starter 

Thanks.

 

I was trying to use the bus schedules to see how many ski areas I could get to within an hour or so from Trento -- or whatever base I choose.

 

I'm mostly interested in a base where I would have reasonable access to ski a different area each day for a week. I'd like two bases -- two weeks total, one week in each. I'm looking for someplace within a few hours of a big airport. I've skied extensively in the US, South America and Austria, but have only visited Italy in the summer.

 

I can ski anything; I'm happy on groomers. I like t-bars. Massive loads of powder are not a requirement, though I would like some place where I can depend on all the terrain being open. As I'm hoping to do this cheap, I'd likely go the second and third weeks in January, as that seems to be a lower season. I like large interconnected regions where I can ski several different areas in one day. I'm hoping for a base where I can stay in something cheapish (E30 would be nice) and eat dinner out of a supermarket each night. I don't care about nightlife.

 

I had not considered Bolzen -- I'll look into that. I wonder if Aosta is a bit too remote for me to get to. For me, candidate airports include Geneva, Munich and Venice; I'm unsure how accessible Milan will be (I'm flying from Montana).

post #5 of 10

First, the airports for each area, to my mind the closest accesible form abroad with a flight are :

Aosta, check either for Turin (Caselle) or

                                  Milano (Malpensa)

 

Bormio and/or the Valtellina area (it's not huge, and the ski areas are sparse over the terirritoy but why not?) either Milano Malpensa or Milano Linate

The Dolomites (in general, let's say that with this term we're talking about an area covering both Bolzano and Trento provinces, plus Belluno .that is Cortina, spanning so into Venice region)

                                  Verona and Venezia

 

I personally wouldn't stay in one of the main towns, it will mean to wake up very early and a "little bit" of travelling around by bus.

Your requirements, particularly the possibility to ski a different area each day, cry out loud for the Dolomiti superski, One pass, 11 areas (or so).  You can literally travel on skis going from one village to the next. This would mean having to organize logistic for the luggage transportation, sleeping in Garnis (private homes with at least one room - with bathroom- for rent and offering breackfast services) or have someone with you taking care of this aspect (or travel light, very light) exploiting the public transportation network (the buses you're looking for)

It won't be easy but I know it's been done. It won't be cheap though, you probably will be looking at E40 at least, per night without dinner (but you'll find restaurants for any pocket around)

Since deep snow it's not this trip priority it should do, piste-wise. But the area is alswo well covered by guiding services, so you could also rent one to be accompanied to some of the classical off-piste routes, if so caught by the whim and favoured by mother nature...

Prices, a week long pass (6 or 7 days) in the period you're planning to be there looks to come at between E200-E220...

Lodgings, ugh, this would mean quite some planning and researching :

http://www.dolomitisuperski.com/en-US/book-your-skiing-holiday-2171EN.html?day=15&monthto=1&month=1&hotelsearch=false&persons=1&boarding=0&accomodation=1&valley=0&dayto=16&yearto=2011&nights=1&submit-search=submit-search&year=2011&place=&hotellist=true

 

This is just an example, food for though. But there may be some agency doing this...

post #6 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by cloudcult View Post
I would like some place where I can depend on all the terrain being open. As I'm hoping to do this cheap, I'd likely go the second and third weeks in January, as that seems to be a lower season.


These two requirements may be mutually exclusive. No guarantees on terrain being open at that time of year, it's a little on the early side in the Alps. The Dolomites depend more on manmade snow and cold temperature than resorts further west, so assuming it's cold, you might be OK. Their season is shorter, so they try to get stuff open earlier than the western areas, which have long seasons and get much more natural snow (and therefore blow less snow in December and January).

Our part of the Alps had all terrain open by Christmas both last season and the season before, but that's by no means a lock.

 

I'm not nearly the expert on the Dolomites that Mr. Nobody is, though I can say there is A LOT of skiing out there and organization is reputedly better than in the higher, snowier western part of Italy. For natural snow, I might be tempted to make Aosta my base, as Mr N suggested as an alternative.

post #7 of 10

Yes, I second Mr. P. about Aosta and the natural snow.

Also, East and West have two nearly different philosophies WRT skiing off-piste.

Almost a no-no in the East. West has a better (some would say) approach to it. Still, on both cases you better be equipped with avy gear (the three...beacon, shovel and probe) which is being increasingly made mandatory (by law). 

post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nobody View Post
Almost a no-no in the East.


Well, there's no snow offpiste over there anyway!

post #9 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Nobody View Post

 

You can literally travel on skis going from one village to the next. This would mean having to organize logistic for the luggage transportation, sleeping in Garnis (private homes with at least one room - with bathroom- for rent and offering breackfast services) or have someone with you taking care of this aspect (or travel light, very light) exploiting the public transportation network (the buses you're looking for)

It won't be easy but I know it's been done. It won't be cheap though, you probably will be looking at E40 at least, per night without dinner (but you'll find restaurants for any pocket around)

 

Could I just pick a central town in the Dolomites -- not Bolzano but a "larger" town in the mountains -- and rather than have to shuttle gear from hotel to hotel just stay in one hotel for a week and use buses to get to the different areas that I could not ski all the way to and back in one day? For example, in the Kitzbuehl Alpen I stayed in Kitzbuehl and skied there for a few days but also took half-hour to 45-minute bus rides (free with ski pass) to Steinplatte, Ski Welt, St. Johann, Fieberbrunn, etc. Regular OEBB busses connected those towns to St. Johann or Kitz roughly once an hour through the day and it was very simple to get around.

 

Would you say the transportation system is as flexible in the Dolomitisuperski?
 

post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by cloudcult View Post



 

Could I just pick a central town in the Dolomites -- not Bolzano but a "larger" town in the mountains -- and rather than have to shuttle gear from hotel to hotel just stay in one hotel for a week and use buses to get to the different areas that I could not ski all the way to and back in one day? For example, in the Kitzbuehl Alpen I stayed in Kitzbuehl and skied there for a few days but also took half-hour to 45-minute bus rides (free with ski pass) to Steinplatte, Ski Welt, St. Johann, Fieberbrunn, etc. Regular OEBB busses connected those towns to St. Johann or Kitz roughly once an hour through the day and it was very simple to get around.

 

Would you say the transportation system is as flexible in the Dolomitisuperski?
 



Yes, it all depends what "larger" means to you.

Bolzano, Tranto, Aosta are all mid-sized towns by our standards, but could be very small for yours...

Any larger village in the area, will just be a normal (if not smallish) village.

Let's see : larger village/townish ones in the Dolomites :Selva di Valgardena/Wolkenstein, Canazei, Corvara/Kurfar, Cortina d'Ampezzo (maybe the bigger and most expensive of these)

Then you could also look into Predazzo, Bressanone/Brixen or Brunico/Bruneck....

And yes, to base oneself "up in the mountains" in just one village and take buses to move around to the fartest area, the ones one can't reach skis on foot, is something that can be done...

 

As for the transportation sistem, yes, the bus companies do operate in the Dolomites, and the schedule is quite good, likein any other countryside area here let'say. But I'm not sure it will come free w/ skipass (when I skied there, it wasn't, but ticket prices were very acceptable)

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