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One Hit Wonders - Page 2

post #31 of 44
If you teach something profound to a student, and they verify that "this is the thing that I felt taught me the most" you've done pretty well. That's a "single hit" and it's a real revalation to the student. If you can then give an external cue, or referance to the student so they can practice what they have learned without you being there, then they can practice the moves.

I did this a lot this year, and had a number of front range (Denver/Boulder) students come back every few weeks to learn the "next big thing". This approach works pretty well for the infrequent student. A "teaser" of what's next will bring them back for more.

My returns went way up this year. Especially in intermediate/advanced lessons. I'd really like to get a bigger "return" on my lower level students. The best tactic for me for lower levels, was going for the "fraidy cats" who want to get better, but are really "freaked" about slippery feet.

The training in PMTS really helped me focus on what is coined as the "Single Most Important Movement" for a particular student. SMIM. Single Most Important Movement. Single Most Important Hit.

[ April 25, 2002, 03:48 PM: Message edited by: SnoKarver ]
post #32 of 44
Lisamarie:
Here's my version of the "One Hit Wonder". It's off topic a bit, but here goes: Elsewhere in this site, KeeTov made an interesting point about skiing with your belly button and not with your feet. That one simple mental trick sharpened up my skiing. I have no idea how it works, but when I hold in my mind the image of my belly button floating down the mountain, I feel lighter and more confident. Where previously I would nervously watch out for every bump and try to react accordingly, my skis now seem to slither over the terrain. No actual on-hill instruction took place, but this for me is a valuable lesson that really works. Truly a "One Hit Wonder". Many thanks to KeeTov.
Geoff
post #33 of 44
Thread Starter 
Yeah, Kee Tov! Many of my best one hit wonders have happened right on this forum!
post #34 of 44
Quote:
When you do a week, you can get the whole thing rebuilt, but sometimes there are moments of pain.
Amen to that Weems! This January/February I spent 5 weeks at Whistler doing the Mike Dempsey ski improvement course (all CSIA Level 4 instructors). The first 3 weeks were fairly brutal with only little gains, and then week 4 a lot of things clicked and then week 5 a lot more....

As an older student, I find that I sometimes have to store things away for another day if there isn't time or the opportunity during the lesson to ask why? I suspect that kids are much more inclined to trust and just "do it" whereas old farts like me have a much more developed need to know why this particular movement is important and how it fits into the overall pattern.

Dempsey was a bit brutal in the early days as we all were confronted with our shortcomings and realised that our supposed expertise was built on shaky foundations. The end result however was excellent, and like most hard earned lessons probably a lasting one. I hope so anyway!
post #35 of 44
Quote:
Originally posted by milesb:
Yes, I should add that I don't believe that a lousy lesson is neccessarily the fault of the instructor.
I don't know that I agree with this statement. While I'm instructing I try to work with the philosophy that if someones not learning, someones not teaching. A good ski pro will adapt their lesson to every clients needs.
post #36 of 44
Ski P. that was way too lucid compared to your from home after scotches posts. Now if a student gave you a bootle of single malt after the first lesson how good would the second lesson be.

By the way will you be at "work" tomorrow?
post #37 of 44
I always ask my guests why they are taking a lesson (i'm a stickybeak). the impression I got in Colorado was that the people I got were taking lessons for very specific reasons. They had a particular need, there was a problem, and the lesson was to fix that specific thing. ie lesson-taking was not a regular thing for most of them. So in that regard, for the guests, lessons were indeed meant to be one hit wonders.

In fact, one lady springs to mind! Her thing was that she was getting very tired whenever she skiied. without having seen her ski yet, I suspected one of the usual culprits, like she was leaning backward, and doing the old heelslide thing (fighting the snow, using too much energy), but on teh chair I explored any other potential resasons...but she was a active woman, played sport regularly, was healthy etc etc.

Well, my first suspicions proved to be correct so we worked on stance and updated her technique a bit (she was on shapes) so she was riding the ski rather than pushing it away.

At the end of the lesson, she seemed ecstatic, and said delightedly "That was wonderful! I thought I'd have to take several lessons, but you've fixed the problem so now I won't have to!".

ooops!
post #38 of 44
Thread Starter 
AH! But Ant, studies have shown that one satisfied customer has the potential of bringing you 15 others! And what better advertisement for your services than a fit, athletic woman. After my lesson with Todd, I told every one of my students who skied to take a private lesson with him, even the ones that usually skied at other resorts. The fact that he was always compltely booked up was another story, but hey, the potential is there!
post #39 of 44
Quote:
Originally posted by dougw:
Ski P. that was way too lucid compared to your from home after scotches posts. Now if a student gave you a bootle of single malt after the first lesson how good would the second lesson be.

By the way will you be at "work" tomorrow?
I guess I'm a bit late with the response but, yes I'm here, last day.
post #40 of 44
Ant,

That's sounds just like me! Leaning back,skidding.
Will you be instructing at Perisher this year? Sounds like your expertise could really help me.
post #41 of 44
Stuff like extremely low visibility, howling winds, rain, mismatched groups, drunk/stoned/hungover students, poor equipment, overly large classes, lack of appropriate terrain. These can all make for a lousy lesson. Not the instructor's fault. Over the years, I've experienced all of these in lessons.
post #42 of 44
Quote:
Originally posted by Skeeter:
Ant,

That's sounds just like me! Leaning back,skidding.
Will you be instructing at Perisher this year? Sounds like your expertise could really help me.
These are very common things we get to fix! And if the guest is motivated, they are easily fixed (I've found, anyway).
Sadly, amoung all the uncertainties in life, there is one thing of which I 100% certain: that I will not be teaching at Perisher Blue!
When I know where I am going to be, I'll update my profile.

I must say, this dodge of grilling the guest about why they got a lesson can be a great way of digging up all kinds of things. Not just their motivation for getting a lesson, but a whole raft of info about why they ski, how they ski, why they think the things they do. Makes it tons easier to deal with the issues in a holistic way, rather than just patching one small thing.
post #43 of 44
Quote:
Originally posted by milesb:
Stuff like extremely low visibility, howling winds, rain, mismatched groups, drunk/stoned/hungover students, poor equipment, overly large classes, lack of appropriate terrain. These can all make for a lousy lesson. Not the instructor's fault. Over the years, I've experienced all of these in lessons.
Sure, these are some pretty hefty challenges but I think all of them can be overcome except maybe your students being drunk/stoned/hungover. Skiing is an open skilled sport.
post #44 of 44
Sorry to hear that Ant. Although it sounds very much like it was your decision. Good luck in whatever your doing or where ever your doing it this Aussie winter [img]smile.gif[/img]
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