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Why won't BASI recognize my NZSIA instructors qualification?

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

Just a little annoyed that the British system won't employ me as they said they don't recognize my New Zealand level two licence. It's a bit pathetic coming from a country that doesn't have any mountains, and the only good skier from that place are the Scottish. Anyway, every other european country recognizes it.

post #2 of 17

skiingaround

 

I'm BASI's online community rep.  Can I clarify your post please - is it a UK based employer that won't recongise your qualification, or are you looking to convert to the BASI system?  If it's the latter, then I believe BASI make you go back one step in qualification level - so a NZSIA 2 would need to start by taking the BASI 2.  This is the same for all other countries' qualifcaitions as I understand it (I can double check this with the BASI office if you like).

 

If it's the former and it's an employer who won't recognise it, then it sounds like you got unlucky as I'm sure it's not the case for all UK slopes. 

post #3 of 17


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by skiingaround View Post

Just a little annoyed that the British system won't employ me as they said they don't recognize my New Zealand level two licence. It's a bit pathetic coming from a country that doesn't have any mountains, and the only good skier from that place are the Scottish. Anyway, every other european country recognizes it.


With an attitude like that i think they did pretty well by not employing you!

 

How about working around the problem instead of bad mouthing one of the biggest skiing markets in the world??..... There may not be any mountains, but the Brits spend a hell of a lot of money on skiing and BASI is a well respected qualification.


Maybe the domes have enough BASI qualified people applying to not need to recognise overseas qualifications??

 

Remember that until you get your ISIA stamp no qualification is truly international......

post #4 of 17

Well the mountain I work at during the season in the UK (Cairngorm, Scotland) employs NZ qualified instructors ... mind you I'm obviously delusional because apparently the UK "doesn't have any mountains" so I can't work there can I and nor can any other instructors!

 

As Beanie says the situation with any association is that you'll have to go back a step/level to convert into that system, I thought that was well known and understood?

post #5 of 17

In the US, PSIA would not "recognize" an NZ level 2 cert per se and may not even "back up a level" as Beanie has described. However, the problem is mostly one of terminology and perspective. In the US, certification is not a license to teach. As Ramzee has (ahem) astutely noted, the issue is whether you can get employed. From the perspective of most US resorts, they'd be glad to hire someone with a NZ level 2 cert and that cert would be considered to be equivalent to PSIA cert 2 for hiring and pay purposes. If one then wanted to join PSIA and get a PSIA certification, the rules would vary depending on which division they wanted to join. In the Eastern division, there is a process to "fast track" certification based on equivalent experience. But there are differences between national accrediting systems and one would be expected to make an effort to get up to speed on those differences before additional certification could be attained. In one sense this would be equivalent to when Beanie said "back up a level", but PSIA would not describe it this way. For example, when Olympian Deb Armstrong joined PSIA she went directly to the level 3 certification process but she had to work to get her level 3. She continued on a fast track all the way to the PSIA demo team, but she had to earn her way onto the team. Deb described the process as surprisingly informative and rewarding. I read that as a polite way of saying that she expected this process to be "jumping through hoops" and was surprised at how much she was learning during the process and how much she liked what she was learning. The suggestion would be for skiingaround to recognize this problem as an opportunity.

post #6 of 17
Thread Starter 

The company was a British holiday company specializing in catered tours to several european countries, can't remember the name as it was a few years back. Maybe it was a company decision then. I never even got to send in a CV. I'll dig around the net and see if I can come up with the companies name. As for the UK not having mountains, come on, they're not really mountains, just overgrown hills.

post #7 of 17


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty View Post

As Ramzee has (ahem) astutely noted.....

 

Sorry, I think he touched a nerve!

 

But good post Rusty.  As you point out, you do not need the local qualification to teach in most places, it is up to the local snow school.  If they have enough staff they will not need overseas staff,  If they need staff they will be welcoming you with open arms!

 

Qualification rules for the local certs are separate from getting a job.

post #8 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by skiingaround View Post

The company was a British holiday company specializing in catered tours to several european countries, can't remember the name as it was a few years back. Maybe it was a company decision then. I never even got to send in a CV. I'll dig around the net and see if I can come up with the companies name.

 

Sounds like you've been nursing a grievance for a while then!

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by skiingaround View Post

As for the UK not having mountains, come on, they're not really mountains, just overgrown hills.

 

Ah, you know them well then do you?

 

You'll be telling us next you're an expert in how to make friends and influence people!

 

The Scottish mountains may not have the size of some more juvenile ranges (they are some of the oldest in the world) but they can be just as challenging and interesting as many on their day, just as well the mountain walking and climbing community have more respect than you do or there would be a lot more casualties than there are every year! Anyway, not my words but those of Swedish adventure photographer Fredrik Schenholm, a man who has been in, and skied in, some of the highest mountain ranges in the world:

 

"Didn't know what I expected, but I am sure it wasn't this. Scotland is reeeeeally good for skiing! Lots of vertical, good snow (plenty of snow), cold and clear blue sky." Fredrik Schenholm - blog February 2010

 

Photos here: http://schenholm.com/Ovrigasidor/adventure_scotland.html

post #9 of 17

Skiingaround

 

I'm sure there are others who will employ you.  Interski for example are always on the look out for instructors, and I can't say for certain but I'd be surprised if they don't accept NZSIA L2.

 

post #10 of 17

skiingaround where are you? You've gone awfully quiet!

post #11 of 17

And just to rub it in (because skiingaround has obviously given up coz he hasn't got an argument lol) here's a new one posted this week from Schenholm's blogs Image of the Week #4:

 

"Per Jonsson skiing in the Ben Nevis ski resort in Scotland. Here, the snow was super cold with a beautiful and magic cloud layer in the horizon. We could never even have dreamt about the conditions Scotland offered us last February. Fresh snow, blue sky and cold temperatures. Steep, exciting mountains and friendly people. What else could we ever have asked for? To be honest, we didn't expect the Scottish mountains to look this big. And with these conditions, Scotland for sure keeps up with some of the best resorts in the Alps. It snowed before we came, and it snowed after we left. This is a trip I will never forget!"

 

This from a man who has skied some of the highest and gnarliest ranges and mountains in the world, including Everest!

post #12 of 17
Thread Starter 

Guys, I'm all for the scottish and think they are better skiers because of the conditions they usually have, ie Ice,  white-outs, patchy snow. It's the english I'm  having a mild dig at. Being part scottish, welsh and Irish it's my job to  poke fun at the Enlgish.

post #13 of 17

You can't be "part Irish", you either are born in Ireland or you're not. If you weren't born in Ireland, you're not Irish!

As for the rest of your guff, read what you wrote, and how your story changed - British system becomes private tour operator. British becomes UK, but then when your argument gets thrown back at you, you say you mean English.

 

My tip for you, the next time you apply for a job, is find out about what you are applying for and where, and what their requirements are.

 

If you want to work for a British TO, take a look on websites such as Natives.co.uk which are there to help people get jobs in snowsports.

post #14 of 17
Thread Starter 

now you're telling me about my ancestry, get a grip. I don't claim to be irish, but those are my roots.
 

post #15 of 17


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by skiingaround View Post

Being part scottish, welsh and Irish it's my job to  poke fun at the Enlgish.


Firstly learn to spell.... and capitalize.....

 

Secondly, with an attitude like that i think they did pretty well by not employing you!

post #16 of 17
Thread Starter 

guys, just get grip

post #17 of 17

Skiingaround. The keyword is : be positve, be propositive. Nothing is really gained by headstrong confrontations. This is the internet, you know?

Nothing to be gained by writing the way you are, unless it is to rant or trolling.

But as we DAGOes say "every game is nice, but must not last forever, otherwise it gets old".

If you're looking for support, be constructive.

 

Havea great 2010-2011 season.

cheers.

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