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New here, and can't decide...

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

Hello! Have to say, love this site!

I have recently "come back" to skiing after a long hiatus. I was an avid skier as a youngster. Then a very aggressive skier (back country, bumps, etc.)

Over the last 2 seasons I have been a renter. I have rented numerous "performance" skis, but unfortunately as much as I meant to, I just cannot remember what I was skiing, and when. :(

Now I am skiing very aggressively again. Last season I really made incredible leaps in my ability... back country terrain that I could not have back in the day. Got into some knee-deep powder and LOVED it! I hit the black Ds without a problem and look forward to just getting better and better. I have never been "formally" taught, but really handle myself well and feel that I am very fluid on the groomers.

I am looking for a great all-around ski if possible. I really don't have the means to go get multiple skis for different terrain. I am not set on "brand new" either.

I want to get more into powder this season...any recs on where this can best be enjoyed in the CA, NV, Utah area would be welcome ;)

 

I have been doing a lot of research, lurking here on this site, going to the local ski shops (although in Vegas, not too much help).

Items that have some up in my research or with friends sales people are:

 

Head 88s, iM82s

Scott Punishers

Atomic crimson, B5s

K2 Apache interceptor

 

Any help would be so greatly appreciated!

 

Thanks!

 

post #2 of 11

For some reason, I suspect that you are using the term 'backcountry' incorrectly.  Backcountry at minimum means you can't get there from the top of a ski lift.  You would have to be on telemark or AT bindings to access such terrain.  Areas that can be reached by going 'out of bounds' along the edges of ski areas, or that could be lapped easily from a road are generally called 'sidecountry' or 'slackcountry'.  Perhaps what you meant to say was 'off-piste'?  That basically means not on groomers.  I will let others address gear recommendations, as there is an ocean of skis out there designed to do what you want. 

post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 

Ah, thank you for the clarification. Although, when younger I did do what amounts to likely a hybrid of that...snowmobile up an untamed mountain on a family friend's property and ski down through powder (but was very crusty hard snow). The reference toward the end would be "side country" just much more difficult/steeper than before.

Either way, plan on real "back country" stuff as I go on

post #4 of 11

Boots?  The standard question around here for someone asking about skis. Get fitted for boots first, then think about skis.  Just repeating what I've seen posted, oh, about a million times.

 

Age, weight, and height would help re: picking/sizing skis.  People on here will help you out.

post #5 of 11

+1 to the boot recommendation. It is super easy to end up in a boot that is wrong for you and will make every moment on the slopes worse than it has to be. Its relatively hard to end up on a ski that will ruin your day. 

post #6 of 11
Thread Starter 

Any truth to the idea that the Fischer boots are better for people with a slight out-going toe stance? Not bow-legged but just a slight either inward heel or outward toe.

 

I am aware of the boot importance. I am waiting for the local shop to get in the full line so that I can really try on everything.

 

I'm 5'10''

190lbs

post #7 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by lvhawk View Post

Any truth to the idea that the Fischer boots are better for people with a slight out-going toe stance? Not bow-legged but just a slight either inward heel or outward toe.

 


yes, but that can be caused by pronation which you can fix with footbeds too.

post #8 of 11
Thread Starter 

What I found frustrating with boots in the past is that so many feel really good "in the store". Where I am in Vegas, there is no try-out policy. Demo days are RARE. My biggest problem with boots tend to be the shins...but this develops toward the end of a ski day usually. Any particular offenders out there that come to mind??

 

Luckily my feet are pretty low maintenance, and even cheapo rental boots have done just fine for me, even on long, hard skiing weekends...side from the shin pain

There is a real bad case of "lead me to the most expensive product" here and seemingly very little constructive input (which is fine if the most expensive turns out to really be the best for me)...hope this changes as the pre-ski season comes about and all the bike frame of mind is changing...they seem like I am totally ruining their day talking skiing during bike season.

 

I

post #9 of 11


The first thing that comes to mind is:  Las Vegas to Reno-area ski shops  in 6-ish hours is /eminently/ doable. Just remember to refuel in Tonopah,  'coz the ones in Yerington close early.  

Quote:
Originally Posted by lvhawk View Post

What I found frustrating with boots in the past is that so many feel really good "in the store". Where I am in Vegas, there is no try-out policy. Demo days are RARE. My biggest problem with boots tend to be the shins...but this develops toward the end of a ski day usually. Any particular offenders out there that come to mind??

post #10 of 11


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by lvhawk View Post

What I found frustrating with boots in the past is that so many feel really good "in the store". Where I am in Vegas, there is no try-out policy. Demo days are RARE. My biggest problem with boots tend to be the shins...but this develops toward the end of a ski day usually. Any particular offenders out there that come to mind??

 


The primary offenders are boots that are too large in size, too high in volume, or both. Fitted properly, a good boot most likely won't be really comfortable in the store but rather, they will feel a bit too tight.

 

The price range on new boots ranges from maybe $250 to $750 or so. Boots of decent quality start at maybe $450-$500 or so. The right one for you will be more about foot shape than anything else.

 

SJ

post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by hiplainsdrifter View Post

For some reason, I suspect that you are using the term 'backcountry' incorrectly.  Backcountry at minimum means you can't get there from the top of a ski lift.  You would have to be on telemark or AT bindings to access such terrain.  Areas that can be reached by going 'out of bounds' along the edges of ski areas, or that could be lapped easily from a road are generally called 'sidecountry' or 'slackcountry'.  Perhaps what you meant to say was 'off-piste'?  That basically means not on groomers.  I will let others address gear recommendations, as there is an ocean of skis out there designed to do what you want. 


eh, if you leave resort boundaries its backcountry. sure some purist will argue that if you got there using a lift its sidecountry.

 

Whitepine canyon  is just and dangerous and deadly as wolverine cirque or superior, for an example in utah.

 

I do think the OP means in-bounds off piste.

 

as for skis the OP those skis you mentioned have pretty wide range of performance. The Punisher should be the most playful and park ready. The IM88 are the most 'big mountain" worthy charger. The IM82 are solid. The B5 force you to carve everything which can be maddening. The Crimson has very dead feel and IMO not that good of a ski.

 

I have no idea what the K2 ski like.

 

Being in Ca,UT, NV I would probably lean towards the IM88 myself, with the Punisher and IM82 being pretty close. Id demo them before buying if possible.

 

Also as other have said get boots fitted properly by a reputable shop first. Sierrajim's shop should be what your looking for.

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