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Wife's Calf Problems With Boots

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

Boot Guys,

 

     In the last 10 years I've gotten my wife about 5 different boots and she complains about them all no matter what brand and the complaint is that they all hurt her front calf.  The latest boots are Dalbello Storms with the non-intuition liner and she complains about the calf pain so much that she has the top buckle basically loose along with the top strap as loose as it can get, so that it virtually does nothing.  Of course she moves around in these boots with that set up.  Is there anything you could recommend that I could try, have any of you heard this complaint before, is there any boot fitter in the Denver area you know of that might be able to fix her Dalbellos to eliminate her calf pain?  She essentially says that when the boots are tight enough on her feet to ski good they are too tight on her front calf.

Thanks for any help.

 

DrunkenFrenchman

post #2 of 12

Hello,

 

I beleive when you mention the front of the calf you are referring to the shin?  Which is the front of the leg at the the boot top level.  This would be something to get a bootfitter to help you with instead trying something at home.  That being said, make sure not to have long underwear or ski pants tucked into the boot and make sure she is using a ski sock that is high enough to go above the top of the boot.

 

Other than that get a bootfitter to evaluate the issue.

 

Look under the 'Who's Who' link and you will find a number of great bootfitters in Colorado.

http://www.epicski.com/wiki/boot-fitters-on-epicski

 

Don

post #3 of 12

I need some help with my anatomy.  Is the front calf the same as a shin?  If it is there are many things that can be done to change shin pressure.  The foot can be raised or lowered inside the boot.  The upper can be expanded.  The tongue can be reshaped or pads can be added.  Your wife could also be anesthetized, but that is rather more dramatic than is typically necessary.

 

It sounds as if you've been throwing money at the problem but no on has ever stopped to understand what the problem is.  It reminds me of a customer from another life of mine as a foreign car mechanic.  He came to me saying his battery kept going dead.  He'd replaced the battery ($80), the alternator ($225) himself and the problem wasn't solved.  I cleaned the battery  connections $10 and the problem was.  Fairly expensive lesson for him.

 

Here without seeing it is difficult for us, but almost certainly there are solutions.  First is to stop buying boots.  You are within only hours of several of the top boot fitters in North America and several are on this site.  Suggest you look at the top of the forum for our locations and find someone.  Vail, Aspen, Crested Butte, Winter Park and Telluride leap to mind but there are others throughout Colorado.

 

Lou

post #4 of 12
Thread Starter 

Thanks to all that replied, sorry for the semantic confusion about what the front of the leg at top of boot level is called, I thought perhaps my description of where my wife's problem exists would preclude any discussion about what to call that part of a persons leg.  Let me try to further describe what her complaint is, it specifically is that her leg at the top of boot level is much larger than her leg down near her foot (lower boot level).  This causes a problem where if she tightens her boots tight enough to hold her lower leg and heel down into the boot so they don't move up and down and back and forth, the tightness hurts her leg at the top of the boot.  Conversely, if she leaves the boot loose enough to not hurt her upper leg, her heel and lower leg have too much room to slop around while she skis.  As to bootfitters, thanks to Strolz for the website link, however, that link only shows bootfitters up in Breck, Vail, and Aspen for Colorado.  Aren't there any experts in the Colorado front range (Denver and surrounds), so that I don't have to drive for 2 hours to have this problem fixed during the off ski season?

 

DrunkenFrenchman

post #5 of 12

A 2 hour drive is nothing to see a good fitter. Think about all the $$ you have waisted on boots, a 2 hour drive is a drop in the bucket. 

post #6 of 12

you will never solve the problem with shin and lower leg in the off season. you need to invest the time and money where you ski to solve a shin problem/lower leg size problem. it is a give and take process that needs to find balance between control and comfort. you cannot get this information inside the shop, you will need to lever fore and aft on skis to finalize the fix.

 

many time this comfort /control conundrum can be addressed by simply getting into the correct size boot. in some cases the reason the cuff gets overtightened for control is that the rest of the boot is too big. can't see if that is the case from here, but it is worth confirming her shell fit. (see the stickies on shell sizing)

 

another strong reason to get the work done right where you are skiing is the added convenience of being able to go instantly out to the hill to confirm success or failure. if the fix is not working you ski right back down to the shop for more change.

 

if you have the work done in the front range, you are expecting to know  that all is good, until you drive 2 hours up to the mountains only to confirm that the problem is not solved, and now that you have started the investment in the front range, you have to drive 2 hours back down to make adjustments, of which you will not know have worked until you drive another 2 hours up to the mountains passing by all of the good boot fitters on your way to the chairlift, etc, etc, etc!!!

 

ever heard the saying " a dollar waiting on a dime"? ( 5 pair of boots to not solve the problem?) go ahead save the 2 hour drive to the mountains, i dare you!!!!

 

jim

post #7 of 12

you will never solve the problem with shin and lower leg in the off season. you need to invest the time and money where you ski to solve a shin problem/lower leg size problem. it is a give and take process that needs to find balance between control and comfort. you cannot get this information inside the shop, you will need to lever fore and aft on skis to finalize the fix.

 

many time this comfort /control conundrum can be addressed by simply getting into the correct size boot. in some cases the reason the cuff gets overtightened for control is that the rest of the boot is too big. can't see if that is the case from here, but it is worth confirming her shell fit. (see the stickies on shell sizing)

 

another strong reason to get the work done right where you are skiing is the added convenience of being able to go instantly out to the hill to confirm success or failure. if the fix is not working you ski right back down to the shop for more change.

 

if you have the work done in the front range, you are expecting to know  that all is good, until you drive 2 hours up to the mountains only to confirm that the problem is not solved, and now that you have started the investment in the front range, you have to drive 2 hours back down to make adjustments, of which you will not know have worked until you drive another 2 hours up to the mountains passing by all of the good boot fitters on your way to the chairlift, etc, etc, etc!!!

 

ever heard the saying " a dollar waiting on a dime"? ( 5 pair of boots to not solve the problem?) go ahead save the 2 hour drive to the mountains, i dare you!!!!

 

jim

post #8 of 12

I agree with Jim, but there is a good fitter in Winter Park.  Use him if you ski Winter Park.  Otherwise follow Jim's advice. 

 

Other than that you've invested probably thousands of dollars in boots, quite likely they haven't fit properly, the problem has been going on for years and is ruining your wife's experience and yet there isn't time for a trip to Vail or one of the other areas to have the problem addressed by some of the best fitters in North America.  Interesting!

 

Are you aware that your wife is considering divorce proceedings?

 

Finally I think you'll find it typical that a person's leg is larger at the boot top than at the ankle.   But extreme differences sometimes create a problem.  You say her foot is loose in the bottom.  This is primarily controlled by the lower buckles and most particularly by being in a properly sized shell.  I'd find my way to a good fitter take her existing boots and start there.  How many mm's long are her existing boots.  It is stamped in the side of the heel of each boot.

 

 

 

Lou

post #9 of 12
Thread Starter 

Hey, thanks to Lou and Starthaus for all the suggestions.  The wife's current Dalbello shell size is 265 and she wears a ladies 9 shoe.  No way she'd divorce my arse because she gets too turned on watching me bang moguls at the Jane!  That being said, I kind of wanted to get the problem fixed during the off season because it's very hard to waist skiing time going back and forth to the Winter Park shop, but I do agree that fixing it on the hill is the most likely to succeed approach.  If you have a bootfitter name for either WP or Steamboat let me know.

 

DrunkenFrenchman

post #10 of 12

Hi Drunkenfrenchman,

 

     So how large are your wife's calves?  If they are large the back of the boot cuff will push the leg forward (a no brainer)--- but now imagine you were to mark the top of Dixie cup front and back and then  push the back toward the front---the sides will pooch out---right?  Now imagine the cup is your wife's calf muscle and  If her legs are "athletic"( a kind descriptive word) this "Dixie cupping" effect will cause the leg to get pinched where the tongue meets the liner (ouch!!!).  

 

     This will also push the leg forward past the centered up position, and your wife will ski the tails of her skis all the time and get quad burn all day long.  A skier can learn to put up with this issue and wonder why they can't ski like those other gals but there is an easy way to fix this.

 

 

mike

post #11 of 12

Fitter's name is Jacques Thomas at Le Ski Lab.  Assume he is still there.   I almost went to work for him years ago but ended up at snowbird instead.  I have heard he does good work.  Certainly it is worth a try.

post #12 of 12

Assume you are talking about a 26.5 Mondo shell and not 265mm shell.  26.5 Mondo fits a man size 9 1/2 or so which I think converts to a women's size 10.5 or 11.  I'd say you may be looking for your sixth pair of boots, but do it with someone who knows what they are doing.

 

Lou

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