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New to the ride...Need help

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
Hi I am new to snowskiing ( Skied the first time almost a year ago ) I took one day of lessons and did really well except I had some difficulty turning....the skis I rented were taller than me ( I'm 5'11 and weigh 145lbs. ) I think they were straight but not really sure, since I am new to all this I need to understand how you determine sizing (165, 180, 190 ?????) The boots were very stiff and had a forward stance to them. I am wanting to purchase my own equipment. Also, I had a problem trying to ski slow...my instructor kept telling me to slow down...problem: I hate the snow plow thing....and it was hard to stop on ice doing this...almost went through barrier untill I just gritted down on my skis ? Then I stopped immediately....I had no problems all day, I skied from 9:am to 4:30pm (took a lunch break for about 45 minutes) I really thought I would be so sore since I had never done this but, it wasn't bad at all....I also jumped from ski lift chair because a little girl sitting next to me got up and put her poles in front of me so I couldn't get up at the time, so I had to jump ( that was a rush ) I fell naturally but not hard.....I absolutely Loved it and am going back next week to try again...Please any info on skis, boots, stopping without snow plowing.......would be greatly appreciated...Thanks, Leisa
post #2 of 19
Hi Leisa,
I'm glad you enjoyed your skiing last year. If I were you, I'd save the money of buying skis, and maybe get more lessons.
Where did you go?
If you have the time, there may still be places available at the EpicSki Academy in Snowbird later this month (you'll see more info on it all over this site).
It sounds like you were given skis that were too big for you last time, I'll let some of the pros on here advise you better, but I'd have thought that starting out on a 170 length would be closer to right for you.
As for the snowplow thing, it may seem like a pain now, but it's a very useful tool that you can fall back on in the future.
Stick with it, and hopefully you'll keep on enjoying this wonderful sport.

S

P.S. Welcome to EpicSki!
post #3 of 19
I am glad you enjoyed skiing and I would strongly ask you to take another lesson. I also see an equipment issue as well as some additional coaching needed. I am not sure of where in the country you are but I would ask epic ski for the name of a pro in your area. Please don’t give up and be assured they is an easier way
post #4 of 19
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the imput....I will take more lessons definately....I skied in Ruidoso N.M. at Ski Apache and I am going back this next weekend, I hope they've gotten more snow, a friend off mine went over Christmas and said it wasn't very good that weekend, she said it was extremely cold and very windy...I can handle the cold though but hate the wind....so hopefully its better now....Take Care....................
post #5 of 19
If you are 5'11" and weigh 145 lbs, and the skis were taller than you, then chances are strong that the skis were way too tall for you.

Yes, there are ways to stop and to turn without the snowplough. Ask your instructor about them next time you go skiing. Snowplough is good for entering lift lines and a powerful intermediate-to-advanced skiing tool. You will come to appreciate its teaching utilities when you really start making turns. But as with any tool, there are situations when you need it and there are situations when you don't. And there are situations when it is plain dangerous to your joints. If you tell your instructor that your knees are hurting you when you are going in a braking wedge, and that you are afraid your knees and/or hips feel like they are going to pop, he/she probably will teach you to stop in a more efficient manner (password - hockeystop ). Probably a private lesson would be better in serving your needs.

[ January 05, 2004, 03:18 PM: Message edited by: AlexG ]
post #6 of 19
Sorry; it was a double-post [img]redface.gif[/img]

[ January 05, 2004, 11:23 AM: Message edited by: AlexG ]
post #7 of 19
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all the info...This is a Great site....I'll be back ...... LIFE IS NOT MEASURED BY THE NUMBER OF BREATHS WE TAKE....BUT BY THE MOMENTS THAT TAKE OUR BREATH AWAY......SKI ON.... [img]graemlins/angel.gif[/img]
post #8 of 19
I agree that you should wait to buy equiptment. Renting will allow you to experiment with different manufacturer's and find what you like, also wait for great buy's later. Invest in a few more lessons, get plenty of mileage and as a beginner keep the length of your ski as tall as you for awhile. This will allow you to master the green & blue terrain quicker.
post #9 of 19
Thread Starter 
Thanks I'll do that......can you tell me about the different terrains.....blue,green, etc. I had a guy on another site recommend going with a 165cm length and a medium flex?
post #10 of 19
Loveski, if you're going to rent, enjoy some shorter skis. I have skied on skis as short as 130s this year (I'm 6' and 180lbs) and they were a gas! Length has much less impact these days (in my opinion). I would suggest that you stick to skis in the 140-150 range for your first couple of time; they'll be easier to learn to tip and turn, but have enough power (if they are modern skis!) to take you a ways up the skill spectrum.

Boots are much more important. Make sure that they "hug" your feet and that you don't move around in them too much.

Regarding trail ratings, see, for example, this thread. Ratings are relative to that area/resort only, and:

</font>
  • Green trails are the easiest ones on a given area/resort.</font>
  • Blue trails are "more difficult" on that given area/resort.</font>
  • Black trails are "most difficult" on that given area/resort.</font>
  • Black double-diamond (aka "double-black") are "experts only" on that given area/resort.</font>
Hope this helps...
post #11 of 19
Quote:
Originally posted by Wear the fox hat:
If you have the time, there may still be places available at the EpicSki Academy in Snowbird later this month (you'll see more info on it all over this site). While there you can enjoy being hit on by lonely Englishmen.

It sounds like you were given skis that were too big for you last time, I'll let some of the pros on here advise you better, but I'd have thought that starting out on a 170 length would be closer to right for you.

As for the snowplow thing, it may seem like a pain now, but it's a very useful tool that you can fall back on in the future. In fact, its all I do.

Stick with it, and hopefully you'll keep on enjoying this wonderful sport.

S

P.S. Welcome to EpicSki!
post #12 of 19
I thought WTF was Irish! [img]graemlins/evilgrin.gif[/img]

Welcome Loveski! Your best source of information is here. Enjoy many happy hours of Reading Pleasure!

[ January 07, 2004, 05:28 PM: Message edited by: Bonni ]
post #13 of 19
Loveski,

Speed control will become easier as you learn to master turning. Right now the braking wedge is your only defense against speed. Definitely take another lesson or two and work on turning skills, then ask your instructor to help you develop speed control through turning and negotiating the terrain.

Turning across the hill and using the terrain is the best way to control your speed. This is something I always teach to my level II classes. Natural instinct for most people is to head straight down the hill and apply a wide, braking wedge. They and their legs thank me after they learn to negotiate the terrain in front of them and turn across (and even up) the hill to control speed. The wedges get smaller and parallel skiing often starts to happen naturally.
post #14 of 19
Taylormatt's post is correct and this is what you want to strive for as soon as possible. My experience has been that once you reach the point of speed contol by shaping your turns and using the terrain, you open the window for real progression from this point forward. I'll have to say though, that screaming straight down the slope can be quite exciting. Not smart or advisable, just quite exciting.
post #15 of 19
Leisa, you may want to take a look at the Taos web site. They offer a 1 or 2 day beginners lesson including skis and they have an excellent (and very progressive) ski school. Small class sizes and good instructors. It's worth the effort to start out with good instruction. Take it from all of us who've spent years trying to undo bad habits.
post #16 of 19
Thread Starter 
Hey, Thanks for all the info....well, I went skiing this past weekend and rented a pair of soloman 145cm.....(which I thought would be too short) but they recommended them so off I went....) I took more lessons that morning and got the hang of turning and wedging alot better,,,But by that afternoon the manmade groomed snow was hard packed and very icy...I got on the wrong lift and needless to say had a ride I wasn't ready for....I got going so fast and obviously not in control and could not get a grip on the ice so I headed to the side where I thought it lookes slower but it wasn't so I went up a hill in between some trees and on top of the hill were more trees and a pile of brush and limbs which I ran over and finally I just sat down so I wouldn't hit the trees.....I didn't get hurt but it sure was scary....took me about ten minutes too get the courage to go on down,,,which I did but I never felt in control of my skis and they felt very unstable going that fast....next time I'll try about 160cm......and hopefully it won't be packed snow and ice.....Had a blast though other than that one episode....need to watch what lift you get on thats for sure.......
post #17 of 19
Leisa- If you do feel the need to purchase any equipment, you should get BOOTS first. Of all the equipment limitations that will hold you back, none can compare to a pair of ill-fitting, poorly aligned boots. I think that a while back someone here posted a description of what it was like for an advanced skier to spend the day in a pair of rental boots- they were amazed that they could turn at all. In order to get a pair that will really be worth the money, you should go here to the bootfitter page on this website and find a recommended person near a place you will be going skiing. Don't just go into any shop and get what is on sale. Bootfitting is a real art and once you decide that you really love the sport and are willing to make the investment, take the time and money to do it right.Once you get to the intermediate level and beyond it will make a huge difference.
post #18 of 19
I want to echo the importance -- no, SUPREMACY of boots. [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img]

BOOTS FIRST!

and welcome to this morgue. [img]graemlins/evilgrin.gif[/img]
post #19 of 19
Thread Starter 
Hey Thanks again.....Yes, I will definately demo different skis and boots....The first boots I had felt good they were very, very stiff and had quite a forward stance to them ( I can't remember what brand) They had three Buckles....This last pair was not as rigid with only one buckle....I think I liked the first ones better.....Im going back in a couple of weeks (hopefully)...I think to Taos.....Or maybe Ruidoso too if they get some real snow.....I don't think Im experienced enough for that Icy stuff YET............But I will be some day....I have No Fear...............................(well...maybe a little) LOL
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