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Time for winter tires - Page 2

post #31 of 48

I switched from Mich XIce to Firestone Winterforce after three seasons. We got pounded here last winter and i was just fine once i got the "no seasons" off  who said that?? too funny. I don't think there is a big difference between a Good winter tire and the Best winter tire. I swap the tires and get the car serviced at the same place/time so for 40 bucks it's not worth it to me to have dedicated rims.

post #32 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post



living at a ski region, and putting up with all the cars sliding around on all-seasons, blocking the road, smashing up our cars, I really don't like this concept. 50 feet of ice you don't see is all it takes to ruin about 300 peoples day. you're a skier, commit to being as capable on the road as you are on the hill. or stay home.


I have yet to be stuck using AWD and all seasons ot A/Ts since 99.  Before that I had 2wd with chains and hadn't been stuck since high school in 1981  I learned to drive in Minnesota and remember most of what I learned driving there.  I bring that and other experinece gined in the Rockies, Northeast etc.   Knowledge and experience is every bit a deciding factor as a  better set of tires is. FWIW I woulde take chains over Blizzaks for the worst conditions.   Things like knowing there is more grip on the loose snow near the edge than there is in the glazed over lanes where most drive can make just as much of a difference.  Most of the people I see stuck appear to be folks that don't have a clue... or folks that had to ditcfh to avoid hitting the "haven't a clues".   I was just fine in the three 20" + dumps we had last seeason, and I didn't chain up, though I was bordering on doing so.  The plows did good work those days..
 

post #33 of 48
Thread Starter 


 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post




I have yet to be stuck using AWD and all seasons ot A/Ts since 99.  Before that I had 2wd with chains and hadn't been stuck since high school in 1981  I learned to drive in Minnesota and remember most of what I learned driving there.  I bring that and other experinece gined in the Rockies, Northeast etc.   Knowledge and experience is every bit a deciding factor as a  better set of tires is. FWIW I woulde take chains over Blizzaks for the worst conditions.   Things like knowing there is more grip on the loose snow near the edge than there is in the glazed over lanes where most drive can make just as much of a difference.  Most of the people I see stuck appear to be folks that don't have a clue... or folks that had to ditcfh to avoid hitting the "haven't a clues".   I was just fine in the three 20" + dumps we had last seeason, and I didn't chain up, though I was bordering on doing so.  The plows did good work those days..
 


It's not about getting stuck, it's about driving fast safely.  AWD and/or chains may help you at low speeds, but they're not much use on the highway, and they won't help you stop.  If the roads are so bad that I need chains with my winter tires, chances are that the road is blocked by some bonehead in an SUV with summer tires.

People who "need" AWD but "can't afford" winter tires don't understand friction, physics or economics.  Winter tires are cheaper and more effective than AWD, almost always.

Quote:
Originally Posted by primoz View Post


@BK: Low numbers are better then high numbers in ADAC tests. So ideal tire should be all 0, but I have feeling we will never see tire like that :)


Thanks!

 

BK

post #34 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post




I have yet to be stuck using AWD and all seasons ot A/Ts since 99.  Before that I had 2wd with chains and hadn't been stuck since high school in 1981  I learned to drive in Minnesota and remember most of what I learned driving there.  I bring that and other experinece gined in the Rockies, Northeast etc.   Knowledge and experience is every bit a deciding factor as a  better set of tires is. FWIW I woulde take chains over Blizzaks for the worst conditions.   Things like knowing there is more grip on the loose snow near the edge than there is in the glazed over lanes where most drive can make just as much of a difference.  Most of the people I see stuck appear to be folks that don't have a clue... or folks that had to ditcfh to avoid hitting the "haven't a clues".   I was just fine in the three 20" + dumps we had last seeason, and I didn't chain up, though I was bordering on doing so.  The plows did good work those days..
 


My earlier post was actually responding to ye. Why not get one oft he more euro style snows with good wet and dry road performance -- not optimiazed for deep snow or glare ice but still a lot better than allseasons? 

post #35 of 48

BK, sorry for my surly response earlier. Out of curiosity where do you live?

post #36 of 48
post #37 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post




My earlier post was actually responding to ye. Why not get one oft he more euro style snows with good wet and dry road performance -- not optimiazed for deep snow or glare ice but still a lot better than allseasons? 


I'll likely get something a bit meatier when the tires that came on the car (Bridgestone Duelers) wear out.
 

post #38 of 48



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bode Klammer View Post

 

People who "need" AWD but "can't afford" winter tires don't understand friction, physics or economics.  Winter tires are cheaper and more effective than AWD, almost always.


Thanks!

 

BK

 

Bang for the buck eh?  Last vehicle that got me around very well with A/T tires was a 96 Trooper.  Care to compare blue book values to what you currently use?  I'm currently using an 09 Forester but honestly the trooper was a tad better due to ground clearance. 

That's it GAPERS.  I challenge you to a Chinese UPHILL.

post #39 of 48

Just talked to tire rack and I can get 16" steel wheels for $55 and in a package with tires they mount and balance, plus shipping is less.

I can get the Blizzak DM-V1 for example in a 215/70/16 for $163 each (with wheels)and shipping would be $97. 

 

Michelin Xice Xi2 would be about $21 per tire more.

Total price (after $50 rebate) about $700 for the Blizzaks', $780 for the Michelins.

Thoughts?

post #40 of 48

I have the x-ice xi2's on my Jeep compass....  Love 'em they handle everything Calgary and the Rockies can throw at them - from ice to slush to deep snow.

 

I got them from Tire Rack and their service is fantastic.

 

I have to swap mine over at the shop every season and it does suck as you are guessing the first snowfall...... with a set of rims you just stick them on when you need them!
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post

Just talked to tire rack and I can get 16" steel wheels for $55 and in a package with tires they mount and balance, plus shipping is less.

I can get the Blizzak DM-V1 for example in a 215/70/16 for $163 each (with wheels)and shipping would be $97. 

 

Michelin Xice Xi2 would be about $21 per tire more.

Total price (after $50 rebate) about $700 for the Blizzaks', $780 for the Michelins.

Thoughts?

post #41 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bode Klammer View Post

I pretty confused about winter tires. In the past I liked Blizzaks and Haakkaapplliittaas, but now there's about a hundred choices.  Also, I'm not happy that I can't get steel wheels for either my Honda or my Volvo. 

What studless tires are the best for ice?  I'm not looking for anything with a high speed rating. 

 

BK

 

I have both a Honda and a Volvo and have steel wheels for both for winter tires.  Why do you say you can't get them?
 

post #42 of 48
Thread Starter 

Ex

Tire Rack has steelies for my Honda, but not for my Volvo.  TR used to get wheels from dealers who upgraded new cars to aftermarket alloy wheels, but not many new cars are delivered to dealers with steel wheels anymore.  I found steel wheels on line, but not with the tires I want.  I would rather have an OEM steel wheel than a cheap aftermarket alloy, but I also want the whole set delivered to my house mounted and balanced.

 

Where did you get your steel wheels?

 

BK

post #43 of 48

A question for you wheelies - is it necessary to have a torque wrench when changing/rotating wheels?

 

The instructions say to tighten the lugs by hand, then to use a torque wrench to tighten them the rest of the way to the recommended torque.

 

I've certainly changed tires in my life and just tighten until it feels about right.

 

What do you think?

post #44 of 48

I read the thread quickly so I may have missed where your original question was answered.  I have heard that tires store better on the rims in terms of maintaining their shape, but I have never afforded steel rims-rather pay for skiing.

 

You can hand tighten them without a torque wrench-strong pull on the wrench, just not capillary bursting pull.  Check all of your lugs after 50 miles or so.  Good idea even if it is done by a shop, my son had a wheel loosen up on him which was mounted by a shop, luckily he noticed the noise before it came spinning off on the highway.

 

I have found the General Altimax Arctic to be a good winter tire especially for the price.  My dealership matched the tire rack price and then I saved money mounting them there and with shipping.  And since I bought them at the dealership it is free on/off.  Worth an ask.

 

post #45 of 48

Bode,

 

perhaps it'd be simpler for others to know what specifically your vehicals are, that way any "great deals" can be specific to what your seeking.  While the Tire Rack may not have Volvo rims needed, maybe others may good lead on what you need.

post #46 of 48

Bode,

 

It's probably that they do not show the steels as available when you select your car make/model online as they have not yet measured/matched your car to a set of steels (Their online selector is really crappy for my Jeep Compass!).  Give them a call to make sure, a lot of the time they will have a set that fits.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bode Klammer View Post

Ex

Tire Rack has steelies for my Honda, but not for my Volvo.  TR used to get wheels from dealers who upgraded new cars to aftermarket alloy wheels, but not many new cars are delivered to dealers with steel wheels anymore.  I found steel wheels on line, but not with the tires I want.  I would rather have an OEM steel wheel than a cheap aftermarket alloy, but I also want the whole set delivered to my house mounted and balanced.

 

Where did you get your steel wheels?

 

BK

post #47 of 48

As long as you tighten them enough that they don't fall of, the only disadvantage I know of is that uneven torque on the bolts can cause your rotors to warp.  I got a Gorilla 150 ft lb torque wrench on Amazon for 45 bucks or something, It works well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post

A question for you wheelies - is it necessary to have a torque wrench when changing/rotating wheels?

 

The instructions say to tighten the lugs by hand, then to use a torque wrench to tighten them the rest of the way to the recommended torque.

 

I've certainly changed tires in my life and just tighten until it feels about right.

 

What do you think?

post #48 of 48

Sometimes eBay has listings for take-off wheels.  The narrowest stock wheel that the cheaper versions of your car had as stock work well with snow tires.  Of course tire width and wheel width must be compatible...all tire stores have chart showing what size tires properly fit what width wheel.  As said above, the skinniest tire that has the original outside diameter and carries the full original load works best in snow.  Often the owner's manual lists the base OEM tire on the base version of the car, and that is usually a good snow tire size.

 

One exception to the skinny snow tire thought---if the depth of the fresh snow is more than 110% of the car's ground clearance, then you'd want the widest snow tires that fit to get some flotation.  Few of us are regularly in that situation (but we can always hope!).

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