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Has a ski injury affected your approach to skiing? - Page 2

post #31 of 53

When skiing trees, one assumption: if you miss a turn, stop. re-set and re-establish the speed and rhythm. That's a basic premise for me anyhow.

 

SH, the worst fall last season was just that. A tree stump that had bee visible finally was covered by new snow fall, but only by about 2 inches. I hit that sucker and wham! that hurts. It was off to the side, you know, not really in a major run. We ski off to the side a lot of course, but maybe a poor strategy early season or low snow levels.

 

I had major surgery in March, then a coma for 3 weeks. completely knocked the sh&% out of me. Atrophy in every muscle, including my tongue and throad. I wish I could shorten all my skis by 10cm until I can completely rebuild. I plan to up-unweight a lot more to save energy and reduce speed, though the last few seasons I've thought that technique kinda' geeky and never much used it unless I was resting.

post #32 of 53
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lizzie-Lou View Post

Yeah, I sort of do love skiing more than life itself.

Ski smart and you'll ski well for a long time.


LIzzie-Lou, count me among those who know exactly what you mean.

 

David

post #33 of 53



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lizzie-Lou View Post

Yeah, I sort of do love skiing more than life itself. I started out as a racer (albeit not a very good one), and have been an excellent skier all of my life. I've had my share of injuries, which have led to arthritis and installation of the various bionic body parts. I am 62 and am still an excellent skier. I ski with the mantra of self-preservation and the desire to still be able show off the skills and style (and style is everything in my book) that I have learned over the years. My husband can always pick me out on the hill, even though my Arctyrx jacket and pants are black (just got a new red helmet so I am now more obvious in the event I am down for the count) because of the way I ski. Caution and care have allowed me to continue to enjoy the sport - and I have to say that I am STILL a better skier than my 30-year-old-know-it-all-lawyer-daughter (and she taught for two years...but, what does that say?).

 

Ski smart and you'll ski well for a long time.



that says that teaching is still, and always will be, one of the worst things you can do for your own skiing.

post #34 of 53

I've had more than my share of injuries, most of them in the past 3-4 years.  I've dislocated my right shoulder twice, my left shoulder once, bruised my liver from colliding with a tree, torn my MCL, and sprained my back, shoulder, and neck from various spills.  I ski hard, and ski often.

 

I think my injuries have affected my skiing. It has slowed me down a bit.  But my skills have also improved, and I continue to challenge myself by putting myself into terrain where, well, s@!t can happen.

 

I'm a skier.  I love skiing.  And I recognize that there are inherent risks in doing what I love.  I'm not yet willing to concede defeat to age (I'm 53), and unwilling to relent on the challenge aspects of attempting to master the sport I love.

 

I could decide not to put myself into positions where I'm at risk, but that is a large part of what I love about the sport.

 

Mike

post #35 of 53

Ski Smart and you'll ski well for a long time.

 

Is this like, 'there are old skiers, and their are bold skiers; but there are very few old bold skiers'? 

post #36 of 53

Amen.

post #37 of 53

Speed also thrills. There is a time and a place for it.

 

I compressed a couple vertebrae racing DH in Italy when I was 19. I quit ski racing. I figured, quit while you are ahead and get on with the rest of your life. I was particularly influrenced by the team doctor's stories about Roland Collombin which he told me about before my accident while standing on the spot where Collombin was injured.

 

25 years later I started racing again, all four alpine disciplines, as I was in excellent condition and knew that sooner or later I wouldn't be as strong so this would be my last hurrah. I tore an ACL after the 9th race of the season and came back strong the next year with a brace. I didn't hold back. It had a lot to do with knowing my conditioning was excellent, good coaching and a realistic view of my abilitites and the potential outcomes. After a few more tweaks to knees in a few more years, I decided to cut back on racing as preservation of what I had left was tantamount to skiing late in life. I rarely race now, but I do ski hard and in tough terrain. My mantra is don't ski faster than you are willing to hit something at and always have an exit strategy.

post #38 of 53

I have a way of skiing I can do that guarantees me that I wil not fall or flail. I do this skiing sidecountry or skiing some obscure run in the last open minutes of the resort. I know how this feels, it's OK, but it is not how I could ski most of the time. A bit of a highjack but follows a few of the recent comments.

 

And yes, above all, speed thrills, thanks for that MR. (And I can't believe you hold to acceptable collision speed.)
A racer's heart and soul needs speed as air itself! Ha!

post #39 of 53

I tore my labrum almost off in a fall last season after a binding failure and a really bad dislocation.  I was skiing fast, but in control, no obstacles anywhere near me!  My binding on my downhill ski released for no apparent reason.   I skied until the day before we closed up for the season, but had my arm strapped to my torso.  Because of the injury I skied much slower, and stayed out of the moguls.  I'm anxious to ski with poles again this season, and hope that that last year's injury won't impact the way I ski this year!  I'll have to post back when I find out!

post #40 of 53

davluri,

 

My need for absolute speed is generally satisfied at Ski Cooper DHs where there is B-net virtually along the entire trail. While I know I can get hurt , I know I'm not going to hit a tree.

 

The rest of the season, I'll take my opportunities as they come on early morning runs and such, but I'm not maching, just letting them roll on some pretty easy slopes. Wide open and far from the trees. As for the rest, I accept that **it can happen anytime, so I'm respectful of what I might hit, so the closer I am to the trees, the slower I go.

 

post #41 of 53

I tore my ACL and meniscus at age 53 in late April 2007 and had surgery about a month later.  5 1/2 months after surgery I was skiing a little more cautiously due to the strength of my leg for the first month or so.  While I certainly don't want to repeat the experience, I think I ski with about the same amount of aggressiveness now as I did pre-injury.

 

Mike

post #42 of 53

I was just thinking "fun" speed, not "serious"  speed. agree completely, and especially that people who can satisfy the need in a sanctioned and protected arena, are less likely to go out just anywhere and let it go.

post #43 of 53

Delibrate1 seems to always post those "issues" that make you think!

 

I am a better skier because of my injuries! Perhaps I am a better man also because of them! They have made me more humble, more respectful of nature. 

While in the past it was the "get as many runs in as possible attitude", or the "go as fast as possible" attitude", now it is,,,,,,I am in this for the long haul! Till 100!

 

I have learned to allow the skis to do the work for me! I have learned to know my limits, so when my son "invites" me to try that chute, that "not so well managed" trail,,,I smile and say, "go ahead and I will meet you at bottom"!

 

I also have learned some key points.

1. Always verify ski trail before going fast!

2.Always take 1or 2 easy warm up runs before,,,

3.Always tune and wax skis for top level performance

4. Always check bindings every month

5.Never ski with "the flock". You know,,,, those 4-7 friends who stop at same place, ski at same pace and fall at same pitch!

6.Never ski with person well below or well above your ability! Many an accident occurs at those "easy" runs when a new skier hits you or those "experts" who want to show you "how" expert they are.

7.Careful of the Wednesday crashes! That is the day ski week tourists get sore, weak legs but still want to get their money's worth!

8.Be more observant of the "flow" of skiers. Seems more and more accidents happened due to traffic and there is a pattern to this flow! It comes in waves! Be ahead of this wave!

9.Be respectful of nature and others,,thus give lots of distance to trees, rocks,  frightened skiers and yes those "experts"!

10. Finally,,know your limit (emotional and physical)! Seems the trend now is to do "extreme" skiing without know really what you can do! Nature knows what it can do to you,,,,and will if you cross that line!

 

Smart man that Delibratte1,,,,he will be a better skier in 2010 and all the other 50 years of skiing.

 

Live to ski,,,,,ski to live

Respectfully,

Vistman

post #44 of 53

What Vistman said.

 

It's amazing how after a while you start doing things differently but not realize it until after someone writes it down.

post #45 of 53
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post

What Vistman said.

 

It's amazing how after a while you start doing things differently but not realize it until after someone writes it down.


Vistman is wise beyond his years. Well at least equal to them.
 

post #46 of 53

Number 4 looks like a good one for me to add to my routine!

post #47 of 53

Lots of good advice here. Mine could help heal after bone surgeries.

 

I had a broken proximal humorous that had 3 surgeries and a 5 year recovery.

 

don't ski/ride bounce

don't smoke

eat good

take vitamins d/d/d/c

exercise every day on a treadmill or indoor bike 1 to 2 hours.

no weed

do the stupid arm swingy things

eat tums for the tummy

eat fish and chicken bones

breath breath breath

 

When I got hurt this site was a inspiration to my recovery. Someone else is always hurt worse here.

 

Hope your recovery go's good!

post #48 of 53
Thread Starter 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Billy0013 View Post

 

When I got hurt this site was a inspiration to my recovery. Someone else is always hurt worse here.

 

Hope your recovery go's good!


True that.

And yes, it is. Thanks.

 

David 

post #49 of 53

In my mind skiing tentatively is a surefire recipe for disaster.  Being tentative puts you in a mind set where you're working against the forces in skiing and not using your gear and the mountain in harmony (wow that sounds like a real "tree hugger" statement!).

 

So I agree - ski smart, understand your own limitations, but always be "present" in what you and others are doing on the mountain.  My injury happened on a smooth blue cruiser where I was going fast, but I really wasn't "in the moment" because it was an easy run.  Once I was able to get back on skis I started slow, but eventually came to a point where I'm skiing even more aggressively and on more technical runs to ensure I'm not falling asleep at the wheel.  I actually work harder at being safer on easier runs because of how/where my injury occurred.  When I'm skiing down a more technical run I don't have to worry about losing focus.

post #50 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noodler View Post

In my mind skiing tentatively is a surefire recipe for disaster.  Being tentative puts you in a mind set where you're working against the forces in skiing and not using your gear and the mountain in harmony (wow that sounds like a real "tree hugger" statement!).

 

So I agree - ski smart, understand your own limitations, but always be "present" in what you and others are doing on the mountain.  My injury happened on a smooth blue cruiser where I was going fast, but I really wasn't "in the moment" because it was an easy run.  Once I was able to get back on skis I started slow, but eventually came to a point where I'm skiing even more aggressively and on more technical runs to ensure I'm not falling asleep at the wheel.  I actually work harder at being safer on easier runs because of how/where my injury occurred.  When I'm skiing down a more technical run I don't have to worry about losing focus.



Noodler,

 

You nailed it. 

 

Skiing tentatively (or doing anything else tentatively) is an internal fight.  There are times it is expected; first time trying something and still learning.  At those times you are probably more focused on what is going on and in the moment because you are absorbing through every sense what is going on.  You are tentative because you are learning.  The next time through will be much better. 

 

When you know how to do something or have done it successfully and for whatever reason (i.e. getting over an injury) you are doing it again but tentatively, that means you lack confidence in yourself and are anticipating disaster.  The lack of confidence might be warranted because in the case of an injury your body might not bet up to the task.  You are better off putting this activity off or approaching it slower until you confidence is where it should be.  I went through this after I tore my acl.  Spent the first day skiing concentrating on how to fall without hurting myself again.  I was more focused on how to land a fall than how to stay upright.

 

Complacency is a surefire way in almost any activity to add to you medical record.

 

Ken

post #51 of 53
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noodler View Post
 My injury happened on a smooth blue cruiser where I was going fast, but I really wasn't "in the moment" because it was an easy run.   When I'm skiing down a more technical run I don't have to worry about losing focus.


That was a decisive factor in my crash. Fresh tune. Wide open blue. I am locked in to a solid carved turn thinking I am the shit.

Hubris kills.

David

post #52 of 53

The injuries I've sustained skiing have done nothing to change my approach to skiing, which is basically, "Stand on your skis and charge the hill!" Life is too precious to abdicate it to fear.

post #53 of 53


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by volantaddict View Post

The injuries I've sustained skiing have done nothing to change my approach to skiing, which is basically, "Stand on your skis and charge the hill!" Life is too precious to abdicate it to fear.

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