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Many questions from a beginner, mainly on skis, bindings, and boots

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

Hi EpicSkiers!

 

I have a similar question - I have been skiing for 15 years on rented skis and am ready to take the plunge and buy for this upcoming season. 

 

I ski mostly blues, blue/blacks, and am looking for the best ski for my abilities and price range (sub $1000 for boots/skis/bindings/poles). Any input will help!

 

Thanks, and I'm excited to join this community :)

post #2 of 9

Keep an eye on the forum Special Deals for EpicSki Members.  Our sponsors post deals and answer questions like this fairly often.  Not only will they save you money, but they are very good at getting skiers of all levels into the right equipment for their ability, location and skiing style.  A little fore information about where you ski, terrain and snow preferences would help.  Also, feel free to ask any of the sponsors for an opinion and a deal.

post #3 of 9



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by GauchoSteph View Post

Hi EpicSkiers!

 

I have a similar question - I have been skiing for 15 years on rented skis and am ready to take the plunge and buy for this upcoming season. 

 

I ski mostly blues, blue/blacks, and am looking for the best ski for my abilities and price range (sub $1000 for boots/skis/bindings/poles). Any input will help!

 

Thanks, and I'm excited to join this community :)


OK, where are you going to ski?  First, Welcome to Epic nice to have you on board.  Second, go to top of page and type Beginner Skis into the SEARCH section and any other questions you have.  There is a lot of information available to you by doing this.  Third, go to the Beginners Forum and go backwards and you will find some info there too.

 

Inexpensive skis/poles, bindings, clothes can be found at ski swaps, get there early and know what you want or take someone with you who is experienced and knowledegable.   EXCEPTION.  Get your boots at a GOOD ski shop or bootfitter.  If you know what you want put a wanted ad in our ski sale etc. forum.  Most Epic Bears will start showing up the lst week of October and usually there is some good stuff for sale in October here on 'epic.

 


 

post #4 of 9

I am in absolute agreement with Pete No. Idaho.  Boots are the most important thing and it is the one area you should not scrimp.  The boot connects you to your ski and without a good fitting boot you simply cannot ski to your potential.  It took me 25 years to learn this lesson (and lots of money) but having learned it, it is the best thing I learned that advanced my skiing ability.  DO NOT COMPROMISE ON THE BOOTS.

 

One thing you must know is that you can't get a properly fitted boot from your average retailor.  Boot fitting is a fine art and the skill of the fitter makes the entire difference between an OK boot and a great boot.  Ask around on your local ski hill about good boot fitters in your area and don't go with the first person's recommendation.  What you want to find is a fitter who is generally acknowledged to be one the best around.

 

As for skiis, it truly is an individual choice that depends on your body build, your skiing techique (I muscle my way around the mountain but others dance like butterflies) , the surface on which you ski and your skiing level.  However, if you found two skiers who are more or less identical in these attributes, you will probably find they each, nonetheless, prefer a different kind of ski.

 

There are many websites that can help you narrow your choices.  Nothing wrong with a relatively new used ski.  If you are intent on buying new, most good stores will give you a credit for your rentals towards the purchase price to assist you in finding the right ski for you.

 

Enjoy - I have for 45 years.

post #5 of 9



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kootenay View Post

I am in absolute agreement with Pete No. Idaho.  Boots are the most important thing and it is the one area you should not scrimp.  The boot connects you to your ski and without a good fitting boot you simply cannot ski to your potential.  It took me 25 years to learn this lesson (and lots of money) but having learned it, it is the best thing I learned that advanced my skiing ability.  DO NOT COMPROMISE ON THE BOOTS.

 

One thing you must know is that you can't get a properly fitted boot from your average retailor.  Boot fitting is a fine art and the skill of the fitter makes the entire difference between an OK boot and a great boot.  Ask around on your local ski hill about good boot fitters in your area and don't go with the first person's recommendation.  What you want to find is a fitter who is generally acknowledged to be one the best around.

 

As for skiis, it truly is an individual choice that depends on your body build, your skiing techique (I muscle my way around the mountain but others dance like butterflies) , the surface on which you ski and your skiing level.  However, if you found two skiers who are more or less identical in these attributes, you will probably find they each, nonetheless, prefer a different kind of ski.

 

There are many websites that can help you narrow your choices.  Nothing wrong with a relatively new used ski.  If you are intent on buying new, most good stores will give you a credit for your rentals towards the purchase price to assist you in finding the right ski for you.

 

Enjoy - I have for 45 years.

 

 

Hijack !    Kootenay, welcome to epic.  Skied Fernie two years ago and loved Lizard Bowl.   Let us/me know this year when you get good and enough snow.   Really want to come up and try again maybe on the way to Golden and Kicking Horse.  Going to buy some rockers and really do the powder this year.

 

post #6 of 9

Did you notice a trend in the above posts?

 

Boots, boots, boots.  Did I happen to mention boots.  Go to a good boot fitter and establish a relationship.

 

One quote from somewhere on the forums applies here, "You date skis, you marry boots."

 

Get good boots and footbeds.  Get them fitted and adjusted to your feet.  Then learn how to buckle them properly.  The rest is easy.

 

I teach all my students how to properly put on and buckle boots.  Normally I get the "hairy eyeball" as I'm doing it.  Then when we get on the snow there's that "Wow, what a difference" moment and they appreciate what such a simple thing does for their skiing.

post #7 of 9

After you get boots that are just right for your feet, your stance, and your skiing style and ability, then get skis. 

 

Buy used skis.  After asking around a lot among good skiers, decide what type of skis you want.  I'm in a big minority here...I strongly prefer a narrow waisted ski for packed snow.  A ski with no more than about 72mm underfoot and 12 or 13 meter sidecut is so much fun on packed snow!...and because you bought used skis and bindings, you have money left for some fatties for deep snow.  Any good ski shop can test the release of the bindings for you, as well as set the correct release settings and tune the skis. 

 

About ski length...complex subject with little good info.  As skis are made longer, they are made stiffer, within a given line of skis.  In the same ski model, a 170cm is stiffer than a 160 cm.  Length makes more difference than just how much sticks out front and back.  Different lines of skis are stiffer or softer in the same length.  And there are no standards.  You really need to try different skis to find out which works best for you.  A ski that is too soft won't perform as you'll like.  A ski that is too stiff will take you for a ride, and not a fun ride.  For my size, weight, style, and ability, I generally like skis one size less than the max available in that line.  My 170 cm carving skis, my 184 cm all-mountain skis, and my 173 cm deep powder skis are all just right for me, and all one size down from the max in their lines.  Your rule of thumb might be different.  And if everything else is OK for you, different makes and models of skis will feel different to different people.  The ski that puts the biggest smile on my face might not be the one that makes your day.  Buy used and keep hunting for skis that are just right for you.

post #8 of 9

Anyone notice that this was posted nearly 2 months ago and the OP hasn't said a word since then?  Makes me suspicious.

post #9 of 9

Maybe we should notify his local PD's missing persons department. 

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