EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Backcountry, Telemark, and Cross Country › Gear for Traveling in the Backcountry Safely.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Gear for Traveling in the Backcountry Safely. - Page 2

post #31 of 47
All good advice here. Onthesnow Avalung question IMHO you should save your money for an ABS pack instead.

Also big dittos on the fire making supplies.
post #32 of 47

GOT MILK ?

Captain_latte1.jpg

post #33 of 47

I have a 10-essential kit and a first aid kit that go into any backpack I'm carrying, other than my MTB camelback (and even then if I'm out all day in the desert.)

 

10-essential kit fits into a small stuff sack, weighs about a lb.

 

In it:

 

Adventure Medical emergency bivy (about the size of my fist)

50' of Parachute cord

Duct tape

Candle

Matches (in waterproof container)

Firestarter

Headlamp

Shot Blocks

Pot of zinc oxide

Leatherman

Chemical hand warmers

Compass/inclinometer

Aqua drops

 

First aid kit has a "splint" made out of a windshield wiper fluid bottle, kerlex, self-adhesive bandage, 2 x 2's, 4 x 4's, band aids, Benadryl, ibuprofin, space blanket, Neosporin, alcohol wipes, shears, gloves, mask, cravats.  Fits in a little bag about the size of two fists. 

 

Also carry a 4' x 6' tarp, shovel/beacon/probe, extra gloves, puff layer, wax, scraper, glop stopper, sunscreen.  This stuff just all lives in my pack, I add food/extra clothing/water as warranted for the day.

 

It looks like a lot of crap but it all fits very comfortably in my BD Covert 32L pack.  The few times I've ever needed any of the emergency stuff I was glad to have it.

post #34 of 47

That's pretty slick.

 

I'd probably add a couple of 'biners and some webbing to the setup so that you could have a tailgunner, if you had a third person available.  Could function as a brake in the front if you don't.

 

I would probably want to do the pulling with cordelette/webbing in addition to the poles, but that's just me.  I'm visualizing the expansion joints in the poles failing.  And if you've got a femur you may want that second set of poles for a traction splint.

 

Definitely something you'd want to practice before you needed it.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jc-ski View Post


How about a video from one of the best?

 


Edited by mountaingirl1961 - 9/14/10 at 6:19pm
post #35 of 47

brain2.jpg

post #36 of 47
Thread Starter 

In AMGA ski mountaineering guides courses and exams, participants must build a sled, place a "victim" inside the sled, and then be able to lower it over a small cornice, and raise it back up.  If the sled falls apart - fail!  If the anchor fails, the "victim" probably doesn't have to buy beer for the rest of the course - at least.  Because of this, I have never seen anyone use anything other than a Brooks Range rescue sled.  I'm not saying no one does, I've heard of it, I've just never seen it.

 

The Brooks Range sleds are built on essentially the same platform as Hattrup's demo, but without the bolts because the shovel handles are custom designed for this purpose.  In addition to the bars, there is a custom, reinforced piece of nylon that becomes the sled, and wraps the victim securely.  

 

Here is the one I carry while guiding, or acting as the distinct leader of a group:

http://www.brooks-range.com/StoreBox/ressle/rescuesledallinone.htm

 

If I am in Europe - where I probably will never have to spend a night out - I carry:

http://www.brooks-range.com/StoreBox/ressle/rescuesledpro.htm

 

And if I am home and skiing with friends, I have someone else carry:

http://www.brooks-range.com/StoreBox/ressle/rescuesledbackcountry.htm

and then I carry the stretcher bars that are part of my shovel handle. 

 

I am actually helping with some guide's education for a program here in Chile right now.  I think tomorrow's weather will prevent us from getting high on the volcano, so we may build a sled for practice.  If we do, I will take pictures and post them as soon as possible.  

 

Cheers,

D

post #37 of 47

That's one thing on the agenda for us very soon. To practice making rescue sleds out of our various set ups. MOST of the time if hunting powder laps, I leave my "touring" skis with the holes in them at home in favour of some thing like my Bro's or EP Pro's. Making a sled with the rescue holes is easy enough, but we should get some practice in and dial our "non hole" setups and see if we need to add anything to our kits to make the process more user friendly.

post #38 of 47

Have any of you ever drilled holes in your skis?  My Gotbacks have holes, but my T-Rocks don't (and probably should).

post #39 of 47

Haven't done it but I could and so could you. Great conversation starter on the lift. Drill the hole and paint the cut inside edges.

post #40 of 47
Thread Starter 

I can tell you that there is nothing scientific about putting a hole in skis.  The hole is drilled in after the pressing process.  You do not need to do anything special to the ski after the hole has been drilled.  There is a slight issue with "tear out."  It is advisable that you clamp a wood block to the base of the ski, then drill from the top sheet, toward the base, and into the block.  If you don't do this, you'll learn what "tear out" looks like.  

 

post #41 of 47

Good tip, thanks.  Hopefully I'll still have good tips when I'm done!  ;)

 

This has turned into a valuable thread.  Good stuff, all.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by AlpineAmbitions View Post

I can tell you that there is nothing scientific about putting a hole in skis.  The hole is drilled in after the pressing process.  You do not need to do anything special to the ski after the hole has been drilled.  There is a slight issue with "tear out."  It is advisable that you clamp a wood block to the base of the ski, then drill from the top sheet, toward the base, and into the block.  If you don't do this, you'll learn what "tear out" looks like.  

 

post #42 of 47

You should probably also epoxy the hole "walls" to seal it to keep moisture out of the core. Not sure that paint would seal it, but it will make it look pretty after you seal it.

post #43 of 47

I cut the tails off my Gotoma tele set-up.  I was planning on sealing it with epoxy, but realized it wasn't needed because I had a clean cut and there was no wood exposed.  I wouldn't mess with the epoxy unless you had some delam, tear-out, or exposed wood core.  My Goats are holding up fine with out it.  The suggestion for a block clamped to the base is very good.

post #44 of 47

Gotamas with the tails cut off are way cool, too.

post #45 of 47

 

Quote:
 I wouldn't mess with the epoxy unless you had some delam

 

If anything it might help prevent this aswell from where you drilled....

post #46 of 47


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by time2clmb View Post

 

 

If anything it might help prevent this aswell from where you drilled....


My experience from cutting the Goats and practicing on my G4s before committing to the goats is that the ski laminate was very tight.  Building and curing a laminate in a ski press tends to do a very good job of impregnating the materials with epoxy and bonding them together.  I've worked with epoxy on a variety of boat building and construction projects and have a pretty good feeling for the resin and the resin mixed with adjuncts like micro balloons, micro fibers, graphite powder, and others as well as cloth wet out with E-glass, S-glass, Kevlar, and Dynel.  I've done hand lay-ups and some vacuum bagging.  I don't think it would have hurt anything to seal and planned on doing it.  I even had the epoxy on the bench ready to go.  I just didn't think it would do what I wanted it to do or even stick without some gaps in the cut to provide a little mechanical grip or "tooth".  The cuts that I made turned out very tight and haven't opened up yet.  Epoxy doesn't like to stick to things like P-Tex or other plastics with out the material being flamed or chemically prepped.  You can read all about epoxy on the West Epoxy site. 

post #47 of 47

 

Quote:
 Building and curing a laminate in a ski press tends to do a very good job of impregnating the materials with epoxy and bonding them together

 

Good point.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Backcountry, Telemark, and Cross Country › Gear for Traveling in the Backcountry Safely.