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How Much Larger Can a Junior Boot Be Made?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

I will start off by saying that I'm going to the boot fitter that fit the boots last year but I'm trying to calibrate my wallet for the visit.  So...

 

Last November my daughter (almost 12 then) was fitted for the Nordica Hotrod (21.5 259 bsl).  Foot beds and the whole shebang.  She tried the boots on yesterday and they are painful in the toe box.  I measured her foot and it looks like she measures just over 22cm.  One foot is slightly larger than the other and there was pressure on all toes and the smaller foot only had pressure on the smaller toes.  She said it feels like her foot is fatter more than longer because most of the pressure was on the outsides.  She is taller but she's only a couple pounds heavier; still slender.  Her feet are wicked flat.  She did say that on her larger foot her most of her toes were curled at least a little.

 

I'm planning on waiting until November to go to the boot fitter so her foot will grow as much as possible.  We still have a couple other pairs of boots; Dalbello Proton P4 22.5 and Rossi Pro Comp Jr in 23.5 but I don't think either of them are as good a boot as the Hotrod.  We played around with different liners in different boots and the Hotrod liners in the P4 boots were perfect for one foot but still a little tight on the outside toe box on her larger foot.

 

Do we have a decent chance at the toe box on the Hotrod being opened up enough to get another year out of them?  There doesn't seem to be that much material in the Hotrod.  The custom foot bed seems a little narrower than I remember it from last year but it didn't "look" too short. The arch seemed to match up nicely.

 

Thanks,

 

Ken

post #2 of 9

Obviously hard to say from here, but boots are very thick in the toe box area and between grinding and stretching one size is definitely achievable.  If she is very flat-footed and feeling pressure on the lateral side of her foot it is possible that her foot rolls inside the boot and her navicular and medial malleolus contact the shell.  This pushes her foot laterally and causes pressure around the 6th toe area.  I regularly find it necessary to make room on the medial side of boots which often eliminates 6th toe pressure without doing any work in the 6th toe area.

 

 

 The bigger question in my mind though is really do you gain anything by having all the work done versus selling her boots (kids boots have good resale) and starting again with a larger size to avoid all the hassle and difficulty.

 

Lou

post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lou Rosenfeld View Post

 

 

 The bigger question in my mind though is really do you gain anything by having all the work done versus selling her boots (kids boots have good resale) and starting again with a larger size to avoid all the hassle and difficulty.

 

Lou



Lou,

 

That's why I'm asking.  Resale for kids boots around here isn't that good, at least that I've seen. 

post #4 of 9

2  important elements to consider:

 

the nordica hot rod is a junior boot. it is made out of a very inexpensive blend of plastic that does not punch well, and the shell is very thin. you will not be able to hog out material like an adult boot.

 

also unless your daughter is very small, that model boot in a size 21.5 is very soft and the cuff height for an average almost 13 year old will be very low. the flex rating is 55. that is definitely soft for a normal size 13 year old girl. usually 13 year olds are skiing in junior boots in the 70 to 90 range depending on weight, height, strength, and skiing skills.

 

jim

post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by starthaus View Post

2  important elements to consider:

 

the nordica hot rod is a junior boot. it is made out of a very inexpensive blend of plastic that does not punch well, and the shell is very thin. you will not be able to hog out material like an adult boot.

 


 

When I looked at the boot, I thought the same thing.  They look very thin.  The Dalbello P4 seem a bit thicker and fit better.  On her smaller foot she said "This feels just like the Hotrods did last year.  It's perfect!" 
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by starthaus View Post

also unless your daughter is very small, that model boot in a size 21.5 is very soft and the cuff height for an average almost 13 year old will be very low. the flex rating is 55. that is definitely soft for a normal size 13 year old girl. usually 13 year olds are skiing in junior boots in the 70 to 90 range depending on weight, height, strength, and skiing skills.

 

jim


She would be "Abby Normal".  Most all her freinds tower over her by 5-6 inches and at least 25 pounds.  She'll be 13 in January, is close enough to 4'8" to claim it and weighs about 73#.  She grew over an inch this past year but only put on a couple pounds.  Built like a ballerina but acts like a tomboy.

 

The Hotrods are a 55 flex and at race  camp last year, they cut a V in the the shell because she was having a hard time flexing it.

 

I'm just going to bring everything I have that's might fit and see what the bootfitter says.  If I have to buy new for her I will, but hope to not have too.  My family is seriously cutting into "my" ski fund.  Especially if I'm going to have to do this every year for her.

post #6 of 9

the hot rod measures a bit on the generous side by junior boot standards. you may find that by getting her heel pushed back into the heel pocket, that it opens up a fair amount of room in the toe box. you said that her foot was fairly flat?, perhaps a neoprene tongue shim will help to hold the heel down and back into the boot? also adapting her heel height combined with a thicker forward lean wedge at the calf will contribute to the same end goal. all of these materials are fairly inexpensive and can be "tested" before making them semi-permanent.

 

some things to help determine your direction:

 

standing in the shell only, toes straight and lightly touching the front, what is the distance between the back of her heel and the back of the shell?

 

is her foot flat arched and low volume over the instep?

 

with just the liner on her feet (heel to the back) are her toes maxing out the toe box of the liner?

 

have her stand centered on her footbed, are her toes behind the front edge or over the front edge?

 

jim

post #7 of 9
Thread Starter 

Jim,

 

Thanks so much for this.  I'll have to corner her again but we did do some of this already.  The shell fit looked like it was one of her fingers.  Maybe my pinkie finger.  Her toes just stick out past the end of the foot bed (it is a custom foot  bed).  Just the part of her toes that curls up.  Nothing is hanging off.

 

I did have her flex deep to push the heel back.  She said it was better but still felt it on her larger foot.

 

I'm a little leery of changing anything (i.e. forward lean) that changes her balance since we did a bit to get her balanced.  She also has a toe lift because of hyper-dorsiflexion.

 

I think the best bet is to throw myself at the mercy of the boot fitter.

 

Thanks,

 

Ken

post #8 of 9

Hi L&AirC

 

     Just my 2 cents---IMO "Hyper dorsiflexion"  would require a boot stiff enough to limit how far she could flex over the ski, to much flexion will cause the ski to over turn and get the skier into the back seat.  I have never used a toe lift to accommodate  this.  Toe lift will affect balance point more than anything and may be required for certain reasons.

    

     I sounds like there ought to be enough room in the boot for her right now and with a little liner work she could be comfortable, provided of course she doesn't grow any more before ski season.

 

mike

post #9 of 9
Thread Starter 

miketsc,

Thanks.  I am waiting until the last minute to get her to the fitter.

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