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tuning novice

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

Just started tuning my own skis and was wondering how often at home ski tuners get thier skis stone ground.Is it even worth it unless you have huge gouges? Please let me know. Also, i have two core shots in both my gotamas and snoop's down to the wood and up against the edge,is a ski shop my only fix?

post #2 of 13

If you are a new, novice or recreation tuner, don't bother working on the core shot yourself. Even pros can't always get it perfectly right. As for stone grinding, some prefer couple of time a year, some less. I do it when the base/edges are beyond home tune or when I can visually spot a defect.

post #3 of 13

IMO, stone grinding should be done as required.  I had my cheater race skis done at the beginning of the year and they'll need it this year too but I skies the crap out of them.  They probably have 40 days on snow.

 

I would throw in the home tuners probably don't need a grind as often since they keep the skis in good order (i.e. saturated with wax).  I also think that when you spend that much time taking care of them, you tend to treat them nicer and minimize the opportunities to let something bad happen to them.

 

Huge gouges can be repaired.  I believe you can repair the gouge and then stone grind.  Not sure on this since I've never needed a repair.

 

Since you're in the Boston area, if you want your skis perfect, go to Precision Tune Center at Summit Ski and see Mike DeSantis (SkiMD.com).  It'll be more than most other shops but he does great work.

 

If you do a search here at epic.  You'll probably find most all the info for repairing your core shots yourself.

 

Posting a pic or two of the core shots will give others a better idea how to handle it.

post #4 of 13
Thread Starter 

thanks guys. L&AIRC i noticed your from NH what do you think of stan and dans in conway NH

post #5 of 13

I've never dealt with them so I have no thoughts on it.  There are a couple on this site that have referred folks to them in the past so maybe they can comment.

post #6 of 13

You don't need to grind a ski after a home base repair. If I did that, I'd have nothing left to ski on in a couple months. I'm tough on my skis as I choose lines that don't always have 100% coverage top to bottom.

 

Down to the wood repairs that aren't on the edge aren't that hard to deal with. Just slowly layer up the p-tex. Don't try to fill it in one pass. Lay down a layer, let it cools, lay down another layer, until it is filled. You can scrape with a steel scraper between layers to make the final scraping easier. I also like to use a panser file to do the rough removal. You also want to remove any excess from the gouge before filling it. Again a steel scraper or panser does the job.

 

Next to the edges is tougher as the edge draws the heat from the p-tex cooling it to quickly and tends to make it crack and separate from the edge. SlideWright (http://www.slidewright.com/, one of our sponsors) has good videos and products that deal with core shots especially near the edge.

post #7 of 13

The Ski Visions base flattener is a great home tuning tool for flattening and structuring bases:  http://www.slidewright.com/proddetail.php?prod=SKV-flattener&cat=131 .  As noted above you don't need to grind after every base repair but I find this is a good way to smooth it out, flatten and structure, without removing as much material as a stone grind.  It's not like a perfect stone grind but an easy DIY that does what I need as a recreational skier. 

post #8 of 13

Ya, I want something like that.

post #9 of 13

Costs less than 2 stone grinds around here.  Not to mention you don't have to waste time going to the shop.

post #10 of 13

It sounds like you've used it with good results. I need that, a base welder, some metalgrip(?) and ptex sheets. They are all on my wishlist. Then I'll be styling.

 

To be honest, though, the last time I payed for a stone grind was on some new speed skis 3 years ago. My recreational skis come cheap, get beat and die a long slow death. The way I find rocks, grinds don't make much sense for my non-carving skis. They don't see the inside of a pro ski shop after the day I get them mounted.

post #11 of 13

The Ski Visions tool is great.  It adds structure as well, and you can choose which stone to use, the coarse stone is good for a wet snow structure.

 

The main advantage to a great stone grind (a la Mike Desantis mentioned above) is to set the geometry of the skis.  Often skis come from the factory with more then a 1 degree base bevel which is not a good thing.  Many stone grind techs can do that to your skis making them worse then before the stone grind.  3 degrees or more of base bevel can be put on skis by a mediocre shop stone grind.  I'd rather have holes in my base then have my edges so far off the snow.

 

The Ski Visions tool if used properly won't help or hurt the geometry, just clean up the bases and give some fresh structure.

post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by ts01 View Post

The Ski Visions base flattener is a great home tuning tool for flattening and structuring bases:  http://www.slidewright.com/proddetail.php?prod=SKV-flattener&cat=131 .  As noted above you don't need to grind after every base repair but I find this is a good way to smooth it out, flatten and structure, without removing as much material as a stone grind.  It's not like a perfect stone grind but an easy DIY that does what I need as a recreational skier. 

 

What is the limit of the width for this tool? Will it handle all shaped skis?

Thanks,

Marc

post #13 of 13

I have found that over the years this type of tool (base flattener) has been getting worse as skis have been getting wider.  ie:  Its a lot harder to get a ski flat by hand now.  I used to just use a good block and sandpaper and could get a good result but now with the tip and tail width being as wide as it is I just goto a shop 1 or 2 times a year and get a machine structure and flatten. (Guess there is a reason for a shop to invest in expensive machines still)

Once I am flat I use a simple base bevel. (used just a single wrap of duct tape for many years but now use a 1/2 degree base bevel guide)

 

rRamjet

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