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St Anton Lodging help

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 

I'll be traveling from Zurich to St Anton 1st week of February to ski.  Last year I skied Zermatt and found very reasonably priced lodging in early December.  I am trying to find the same for my trip to St Anton, but it seems everything in St. Anton is pricey.  I'm traveling by myself to ski and just want a room, $100/nt or less, but not too far out, so I can wonder around town in the evening.

 

Now I see there are some rooms but they are >10miles from St. Anton.  I would like to take the train from Zurich right to St. Anton and hopefully a tax to my hotel w/ only a short shuttle to a ski lift.  I'm only skiing 2 days, with a slight chance of skiing the afternoon of my first day.  An option would be to drive from the Zurich airport, but i'll be on east coast us time, and likely would appreciate a few nods in the train.  Plus I would like to avoid the hassle of driving in a foreign country/language, but that is an option.  Any ideas?  Anyone know the layout enough to suggest a town right down the road from St. Anton where I could get reasonable lodging, with easy access to St. Anton.  Am I right in that this is an enormous area and that wherever I stay within 10 miles of St Anton I'll be skiing the interconnected mountain.  Also, another option, I didn't check, maybe the train stops at something like Lech, how big is that compared to St. Anton?, any maybe the lodging is cheaper.

 

I'm just trying not to spend >$300 for 2nt in a room by myself!

post #2 of 24
Thread Starter 

I have it figured out and booked, I'm staying in St Christoph, it's not cheap, but the lifts are right there and I got a single.

post #3 of 24

St. Christoph is a bit removed from the party scene in St. Anton proper. But, it's in a great location for getting to the other areas of the Arlberg for skiing, like Stuben, Lech, Zurs, etc. So, if you're only there for the skiing, you're in a good spot.

 

When I was there, I found I spent less time skiing St. Anton and more time in the other areas. There were fewer crowds to compete with and just as much terrain to play on.

post #4 of 24
Thread Starter 

Have you skied Lech?  I read that it is an intermediates area, but there seems to be quite a bit of red runs.

http://www.snow-forecast.com/resorts/Lech/pistemap_full

Is like a 30 minute drive from St. Christoph?

post #5 of 24

I stayed in St. Christoph once for a week & agree that it is a good access point to the skiing.  I think it was one quick t-bar ride & you were connected with the St. Anton lift system.  To make the most of your short time, consider hiring a guide.  There is a great OB run from the top of the Valuga down into Lech & Zurs.  A quick bus or taxi ride & we were skiing Steuben, & then back to St. Christoph & St. Anton all in one day.  This was over 20 years ago & I remember it very well.  I returned to the area in 2000 & skied Lech one day & St. Christoph & St. Anton on another.  The whole region is huge & gets a relative large amount of snow.

 

The day I spent in Lech was mostly off piste & much of it OB.  There was plenty of good skiing & untracked powder.  Most euros will not ski off piste without a guide, & I certainly wouldn't publicly recommend it.  I think Lech is kinda considered a high end ritzi Vail/Deer Valley type scene.  St. Anton is a party town.

 

JF

post #6 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by SnowbirdDevotee View Post

Have you skied Lech?  I read that it is an intermediates area, but there seems to be quite a bit of red runs.

http://www.snow-forecast.com/resorts/Lech/pistemap_full

Is like a 30 minute drive from St. Christoph?


There's a free bus running from St. Christoph to Lech. It's only about a 5 minute ride. Also, as 4ster mentioned, there is an off-piste route from the top of the Valuga over there. But, you might not want to try that by yourself the first time. I hear it's a tricky entry.

 

I found Zurs, Lech, and Oberlech to be better skiing because the crowds were much thinner. This left more fresh tracks for my brother and me. In St. Anton proper, there were too many powder hounds and wannabes to compete with, as well as hordes of other skiers on piste.

 

post #7 of 24

Lech has some great skiing. Maybe not as steep as the Valuga chutes, but very good stuff. Lech and Zurs get slightly more snow than St Anton too. Townwise, I prefer St Anton, where BTW, there are a number of reasonably priced places to stay. Steuben too has lots of good options. Lech, Zurs and St Christophe are much more expensive. St Christophe has two excellent lunch places, one of which has a slide to take you down to the john.

post #8 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by CerebralVortex View Post

I found Zurs, Lech, and Oberlech to be better skiing because the crowds were much thinner. This left more fresh tracks for my brother and me. In St. Anton proper, there were too many powder hounds and wannabes to compete with, as well as hordes of other skiers on piste.

 


Same here. 

post #9 of 24

Glad I found this thread. Just booked a one week trip to Lech for the first week in March '11. It worked out to $150 pp/pn, half board with slopeside lodging. Got some nice quotes fm the Lech-Zuers tourism website. There were a few other pensions that were a few minutes outside of Lech, which came in around $125 pp/pn, but for being in Lech and basically ski in-out was worth it. Like CerebralVortex mentioned, decided if I could find decent lodging in Lech, that I would prefer that area in the hopes of not having to fight for the fresh tracks. Any other tips for Lech ski runs that shouldn't be missed? Is the Weisse Ring worth it? Would a solid intermediate in our group be able to do it without getting stressed out on a black run?

 

Is it worth it to hire a guide for a day for the Lech/Zuers area? I'll be fine skiing some intermediate off-piste, although it would be nice to get into some more expert terrain if it's lift accesible or even requires a bit of a hike/traverse. I'll be travelling with my avy gear. I've skied the backbowls of Whistler Blackcomb, Spanky's Ladder, etc. I suspect I'll work my way over to St Anton for at least one of the days. Plan on following the snow the second week of March, so keeping options open for other resorts either in Austria or Switz. Heck even Italy if that's where the snow is.

post #10 of 24

There's a lot of easily access off piste areas in Lech and Zurs that should keep you occupied for a couple of days. Just keep your eyes open when you're on the lifts. Also, be sure to check out Stuben. It's the forgotten sibling that no one visits, so there are some nice runs there as well.

 

If there's not enough new snow to keep you happy going over runs you've already hit, then a guide will be a good idea.

post #11 of 24
Thread Starter 

Is there a problem with crevasses in St.Anton/Lech/Zurs - is it dangerous skiing off-piste?

Is there a problem with rescue when skiing off piste?

Do these areas have those orange poles marking the piste, and when skiing off-piste you are entering a whole new arena with a separate set of rules?

post #12 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by SnowbirdDevotee View Post

Is there a problem with crevasses in St.Anton/Lech/Zurs - is it dangerous skiing off-piste?

Is there a problem with rescue when skiing off piste?

Do these areas have those orange poles marking the piste, and when skiing off-piste you are entering a whole new arena with a separate set of rules?


There's little to no glacier, so you won't have to contend with Chamonix style crevasses lurking everywhere.

post #13 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toadman View Post

 Any other tips for Lech ski runs that shouldn't be missed? Is the Weisse Ring worth it? Would a solid intermediate in our group be able to do it without getting stressed out on a black run?

 

Is it worth it to hire a guide for a day for the Lech/Zuers area? I'll be fine skiing some intermediate off-piste, although it would be nice to get into some more expert terrain if it's lift accesible or even requires a bit of a hike/traverse. I'll be travelling with my avy gear. I've skied the backbowls of Whistler Blackcomb, Spanky's Ladder, etc. I suspect I'll work my way over to St Anton for at least one of the days.


First of all, Weiss Ring is something that you will do one way or another. Make sure your solid intermediate can ride a steepish fast t-bar with two hundred germans watching him. Also, expoect to se some bumps near the end as you descend back from the Madloch. 

 

The expert terrain is very accessible, and if you pick away at it a bit a time you can do it without getting in too much trouble. You'll be able to pick up a copy of Andy Thunner's book "Off-Piste Around the Arlberg" in town. Do it, you'll want that. A guide would be great for some of the more out of the way runs such as the run that goes from Zurs to Stuben crossing the FlexenPass. I'd not want to try that without a guide. I think you could fall to your death if you messed up your route selection. Skins and AT bindings will also open up a lot of stuff to you.

post #14 of 24

ApartHotel Anton in St.Anton, good price, modern architecture in an Alpine setting, and right in front of the Galzig Bahn !! Literally !! The owners are also nice and friendly people

 

Lemme know if you have any questions about the skiing area, it's a great place to ski off piste, so many options for different levels, and a wide variety of available instruction and tours if you are looking for that

post #15 of 24

Did you figure out travel from ZRH to the ski area?  Have you looked into a bus from the airport?  probably more convienent.

post #16 of 24

We stayed at a Zimmer Frei (a room in some little old lady's house who spoke no English) on the outskirts of town (maybe even another town, to the east), saved a bundle in lodging and then took the municipal Post Bus.  It was cheap, and ran with German timliness, fast, had ski racks outside and chains on the wheels.  Drops you off a the lifts.  Smart move if you plan on drinking afterwards, and saves you a boat load of money.

post #17 of 24

For the record, I thought this place was a pretty good deal http://www.hotel-freisleben.at/.

 

 

The Rendl section is another place to look at, though it seems that hotels there are being transformed into chalet or chalet/hotels.

post #18 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by envgeo View Post

Did you figure out travel from ZRH to the ski area?  Have you looked into a bus from the airport?  probably more convienent.

 

I'd have to say the train is the best way to go. First, you've got the train station directly under the airport taking you to Zurich central. And from there, you can catch a direct train to St. Anton (no connections). The ticket office in the airport station can get you everything you need, and the station in St. Anton is right in the thick of it all (I saw Zurichers stepping off the train straight to the lifts for day skiing).

 

I find trains to be much less cramped than buses, so I go with that when I can.

post #19 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by billskis View Post

We stayed at a Zimmer Frei (a room in some little old lady's house who spoke no English) on the outskirts of town (maybe even another town, to the east), saved a bundle in lodging and then took the municipal Post Bus.  It was cheap, and ran with German timliness, fast, had ski racks outside and chains on the wheels.  Drops you off a the lifts.  Smart move if you plan on drinking afterwards, and saves you a boat load of money.



Afaik "Zimmer Frei" is not a type of hosting.

It simply means "Rooms available".

A private house with rooms to let which provide breakfast as well, in this corner of the world is called "Garni"

Anyhow, that is the norm, I've been staying in Garnis since a loong time, and I find the accomodation as convenient as the fanciest of the hotels. Usually the "atmosphere" is warmer as well.

post #20 of 24
Thread Starter 

I'm traveling to St. Anton Jan 28th, arriving at 8:30am.  Last year I flew into Geneva and took the train to Zermatt.  It was a 4 hr train ride with connections, I think, and I didn't arrive until the afternoon, too late for skiing.  Because I am only going for 2 1/2 days of skiing, this year I'm going to take  the chance and rent a car and drive from Zurich to St. Anton.  I should be on the hill by 1pm.  I put off buying a auto GPS unit, but just picked one up with Europe maps on it, I figure that should get me from Zurich to St. Anton.  Also, with the car, i can more easily go and ski the Lech-Zuri area for a day.  1st half day - St. Anton, 2nd Day - Lech-Zuri, 2rd Day St Anton.  I'm staying in St. Christopher. 

May seem like a lot of travel, but I have a free flight, and don't want to take too much time off from work.  3 days should do it.  I'll be back to a Europe a few more times.  Hopefully yearly.


Edited by SnowbirdDevotee - 9/1/10 at 8:45pm
post #21 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by SnowbirdDevotee View Post

I'm traveling to St. Anton Jan 28th, arriving at 8:30am.  Last year I flew into Geneva and took the train to Zermatt.  It was a 4 hr train ride with connections, I think, and I didn't arrive until the afternoon, too late for skiing.  Because I am only going for 2 1/2 days of skiing, this year I'm going to take  the chance and rent a car and drive from Zurich to St. Anton.  I should be on the hill by 1pm.  I put off buying a auto GPS unit, but just picked one up with Europe maps on it, I figure that should get me from Zurich to St. Anton.  Also, with the car, i can more easily go and ski the Lech-Zuri area for a day.  1st half day - St. Anton, 1nd Day - Lech-Zuri, 2rd Day St Anton.  I'm staying in St. Christopher. 

May seem like a lot of travel, but I have a free flight, and don't want to take too much time off from work.  3 days should do it.  I'll be back to a Europe a few more times.  Hopefully yearly.


Judging by the Swiss Rail site, driving to St. Anton should be really quick. The train ride from Zurich central is only 2:20 on the fast train (looking at tomorrow's date, they have one leaving at 8:40 and arriving at 10:59), so unless you get lost, it should be faster than that by car.

 

post #22 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by SnowbirdDevotee View Post

  Also, with the car, i can more easily go and ski the Lech-Zuri area for a day.


You don't need a car for that. Buses run between the two every few minutes. Also, if perchance you have a guide, you can ski from St Christoph down into Zurs ( they won't let you on the tram without a guide).

post #23 of 24
Thread Starter 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by CerebralVortex View Post

Judging by the Swiss Rail site, driving to St. Anton should be really quick. The train ride from Zurich central is only 2:20 on the fast train (looking at tomorrow's date, they have one leaving at 8:40 and arriving at 10:59), so unless you get lost, it should be faster than that by car.

 


But I won't make the 8:40 train.  I won't get to St Anton until after noon, then I'll have to get to St. Chris. or stow my luggage somewhere near the train. And will have a similar headache going back.  I'll probably be more comfortable stopping for a short snooze in my car during my drive, rather than on the train.

 

Hopefully this year I won't be writing a report, St Anton Not My Kind of Skiing.

http://www.epicski.com/forum/thread/89239/zermatt-not-my-kind-of-skiing

but I know I'll completely enjoy myself no matter what, like I did last year.

post #24 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by SnowbirdDevotee View Post

 

Hopefully this year I won't be writing a report, St Anton Not My Kind of Skiing.

http://www.epicski.com/forum/thread/89239/zermatt-not-my-kind-of-skiing

but I know I'll completely enjoy myself no matter what, like I did last year.


St. Anton draws a very different crowd and gets different levels of snowfall compared to Zermatt. So, unless it's a bad winter with little snow, you'll see a lot more tracks off to the side of the marked piste and all over the various bowls the people traverse out to. You can use those tracks as a rough guide as to where the good stuff is, but don't follow them blindly. Although the Arlberg area isn't glacial, there are still plenty of cliffs to fall off of. So, scope out your entire line from the lift or from below, because you can easily find yourself with no exit route. Europeans have no qualms about having a 100-ft cliff in the middle of a bunch of marked runs.

 

The piste itself will be heavily groomed for the tourists who only carve, just like in Zermatt, so you won't find any mogul fields on any blues, reds, or blacks. However, there are a bunch of ski routes (normal and extreme) that are marked but not groomed and will give you plenty of moguls to knock yourself out on unless the snowfall is unusually high (in which case, you'll be too busy playing in the powder to care). They are marked in dotted red or black lines on the map. http://ski.intermaps.com/skiarlberg/en_west.html

 

Remember that the trees (which they don't have in Zermatt) are considered off limits throughout the entire area. You'll see signs mentioning large fines for skiing in them, though you'll see tracks here and there from those who can't resist. So, you ski them at your own risk to your wallet.


Edited by CerebralVortex - 9/2/10 at 8:58am
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