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packable light weight rain jacket

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 

Not exactly a ski gear question but I need a light weight packable parka. Does not need to be waterproof like a slicker but I'd like for it to keep me dry in a lite rain. Everything I've tried on seems like it has a rubberized coating on the inside that's uncomfortable in warm weather. Any suggestions on something that will shed water on the outside and feel comfortable to your skin on the inside?

post #2 of 23

I like the Marmot PreCip jacket. I use mine year round.

post #3 of 23

I also use the pre-cip jacket and pants.  They are great light weight breathable wind and rain gear, pack small, and work great in a layering system,  Too light weight for me to use for skiing, but they could work like that for many other people. 
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jonrpen View Post

I like the Marmot PreCip jacket. I use mine year round.

post #4 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by steveturner View Post

Not exactly a ski gear question but I need a light weight packable parka. Does not need to be waterproof like a slicker but I'd like for it to keep me dry in a lite rain. Everything I've tried on seems like it has a rubberized coating on the inside that's uncomfortable in warm weather. Any suggestions on something that will shed water on the outside and feel comfortable to your skin on the inside?


I think... you are talking about the laminate fabrics, like gortex, precip, etc... I would try on something made with Goretex proshell, it has a different feel inside than other laminates. If you don't like that... then you need to look at a soft shell water resistant material.

 

post #5 of 23

I use a Marmot "DriClime Catalyst" jacket for when I want a little moisture protection without wearing a full-blown raincoat. The Catalyst has a soft fabric liner. It may be fractionally warmer than a pure raincoat but not much. I've worn it when the temperature is between about 60 and 70 and it was fine, but not sure about warmer days than that.

 

It does not have a hood, though. So if you're looking for serious rain protection, it's probably not the best choice .. more if you want a little "just in case" safeguard.

post #6 of 23


another Precip user -- for about ten years now -- got some duct tape on one forearm where i slit the jacket through somehow, but all else is hanging pretty well.  Very lightweight and not too costly.  In fact believe the redesigned Marmot is better, but haven't worn out my current jacket yet. 
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tetonpwdrjunkie View Post

I also use the pre-cip jacket and pants.  They are great light weight breathable wind and rain gear, pack small, and work great in a layering system,  Too light weight for me to use for skiing, but they could work like that for many other people. 
 


 
post #7 of 23

I'll assume this is for hiking, backpacking, etc.. since I'm often above treeline, I usually bring a superlight windshell (Patagonia Houdini, 4oz) and a superlight rainshell (Outdoor Research Zealot, 7oz). If it's warm and I'm not worrying about hypothermia, I usually don't bother trying to stay completely dry in a light rain or short downpour and just wear the windshell, which sheds rain for about 15-20 minutes, keeps me warm (kills windchill), dries off in a matter of seconds and is very comfortable to hike in. The rainshell is more for emergency situations, really cold rain, or severe downpours. Lightweight very-breathable windshells are pretty easy to find, so I'll give you a list of lightweight rainshells (much harder to find):


The lightest weight waterproof rain jacket on the market, but not very breathable:

http://www.rei.com/product/794473

 

Lightest weight GoreTex rain jacket on the market:

http://marmot.com/products/nano_jacket?p=110,170,72

 

Lightest weight jacket with pitzips for venting (pitzips always seem to work better than fancy fabric tech like GoreTex):

http://marmot.com/products/super_mica_jacket?p=110,170,72

 

However, if I had to pick one at this time, I'd get this one:

http://www.montbell.us/products/disp.php?cat_id=59&p_id=2328469

 

The reason why, is that it has core vents (i.e. pitzips) and the waterproofing technology is air permeable (like eVent, but lighter weight and less expensive). For more details on air permeability, see here:

http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/forums/thread_display.html?forum_thread_id=6627

 

Of course, you can also wait for Montane's 7.4oz eVent smock that will be coming out in the near future:

http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/orsm2010_day_2_new_interesting_gear.html


Edited by Brian Lindahl - 8/24/10 at 3:24pm
post #8 of 23
Thread Starter 

Thanks All

 

Brian you're obviously very knowledgeable. This purchase is primarily for travel, not trekking/hiking, in warm climates. The rubbery feel of the inside of some jackets is uncomfortable in short sleeves. Any particular advice on how these various models feel against bare skin?.

post #9 of 23

I am curious why pople recommend PreCip fabrics- in my experience it is not very breathable, and not very durable,and feel clammy and sticky; the only good attribute is the relatively low price.   My recommendation for a lighweight packable waterproof jacket for warmer climates would be eVent fabric, which is the most breathable of all the waterproofs.  I can elaborate the technical reasons, but suffice to say that it is so breathable that it is customary to omit the pitzips on the eVent technical jackets.  If you live near REI check out their Shuksan jacket, if you want the best eVent garments, look at Westcomb.  One word of caution- eVent jackets are too breathable for skiing except on a very wam day- on a regular day they are too cold (and I ski at sunny Tahoe).

 

post #10 of 23

The OP lives in the south east. IMO, Waterproof breathable shells simply do not work in warm humid weather. It is always at or near 100% rleative humidity when its raining. The only way that sweat is going to leave the garment is to evaporate inside and then diffiuse through the shell to the outside. Evaportation will not happen when if the relative humidity inside the shell is close to  100%. Which is where it will be if the external temps are close enough to body temperature and high humidity (85F and raining) then you will still be soaked even in a water proof breathable shell.

post #11 of 23

Correct, waterproofs dont work in the warm tropical climates for the reasons specified in the post: there is no driving force to cause the water transport through the membrane.   

post #12 of 23

Steve, renew your Supporter Status and get access and you will get access to Promotive which has Helly Hanson jackets at very special "insider" pricing. You will not be disappointed. There is a great selection of waterproof jackets.


Edited by Philpug - 8/26/10 at 9:33pm
post #13 of 23
Phil- how often do supporters need to renew?
post #14 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by alexzn View Post

Phil- how often do supporters need to renew?


Once a year. You can renew early (now) and the 1 year would be added to your current expiration date. This will give you the Promotive benefit plus add your name into the drawing for the skis. 

post #15 of 23
Thread Starter 

"renew your Supporter Status"

 

DONE

 

"waterproofs don't work in the warm tropical climates for the reasons specified in the post: there is no driving force to cause the water transport through the membrane"

 

That makes perfect sense but I'd never thought of it that way. I've never spent any time in a climate where it wasn't humid when it was raining so maybe all this waterproof breathable stuff is just smoke and mirrors anyway. It's why my high priced Gore-tex pull-over golf jacket and pants are still uncomfortable almost any time I put mine on. This will be used primarily in 80 degree plus days and 60 degree nights. Maybe the best setup for day to day travel use is a light weight nylon jacket with a hood that is sprayed with scotch guard. I've got a casual cotton sport coat that will hold out for a while in a light rain with just the scotch guard spray. Nylon is naturally less absorbent and would be even better. I know I need the repellent on the outside so the inside isn't sticky against my bare skin.

post #16 of 23

Some nice Helly Hansons to choose from.

post #17 of 23
Thread Starter 

I see a Frog Toggs ad comes up on my computer. I have not heard of this brand. Anyone with any experience with this product? It seems to be a different material than most of it's competitors.

post #18 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by steveturner View Post

"waterproofs don't work in the warm tropical climates for the reasons specified in the post: there is no driving force to cause the water transport through the membrane"

 

That makes perfect sense but I'd never thought of it that way. I've never spent any time in a climate where it wasn't humid when it was raining so maybe all this waterproof breathable stuff is just smoke and mirrors anyway.

OK, here is a little explanation.  Of course the humidity is very high when it is raining (close to a 100%), however, if the temperature outside is colder than the temperature inside your jacket, even if the relative humidity is close to 100% in both places, the absolute humidity is different.  Simply put, warm air can hold a lot more moisture than cold air.  That's why in winter you have plenty of driving force (i.e. the difference in absolute humidity) to move the water vapor across the membrane.   GoreTex outerwear works in winter and works very well.   It fails in two cases: when the air temperature outside is comparable to the body temperature, and when there is a thin film of water covering the membrane (which basically equalizes the driving force), so maintain that DWR coating.  

post #19 of 23

I can recommend the Helly Hansen Seattle Packable Jacket. Doesn't have a rubber feel to it at all. Feels nice wearing short sleeve under.

 

I wear this casually and actually took it up one day last Spring to ski in. (in the rain  ) Kept me dry.

 

post #20 of 23

I shelled out for a Gore Tex Paclite jacket for bike commuting use (90 euros; mine made by Salewa). Seemed expensive at the time for non-tech use, but it was worth it.

post #21 of 23

Quote:

Originally Posted by steveturner View Post
Brian you're obviously very knowledgeable. This purchase is primarily for travel, not trekking/hiking, in warm climates. The rubbery feel of the inside of some jackets is uncomfortable in short sleeves. Any particular advice on how these various models feel against bare skin?.

 

Each of these models pretty much feels the same, except the North Face Anorak which will be slightly less comfortable. If by rubbery feel, you mean the rubbery feel of impermeables (typically polyurethane-coated or PVC-coated polyester) that don't breath, then no, none of them have that rubbery feeling and are much more comfortable than that on bare skin.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by alexzn View Post

One word of caution- eVent jackets are too breathable for skiing except on a very wam day- on a regular day they are too cold (and I ski at sunny Tahoe).

 


Bull on this one. They aren't perfectly windproof (air permeable), but they're plenty warm for skiing in Colorado, even the upper mountain at Brrrrrreckenridge and Loveland. I'm typically only wearing my R1 Hoody (and nothing else) underneath my Armada Inverse eVent jacket, and will throw an Icebreaker 200 long-sleeve on underneath on colder days. I rarely pull out my fleece vest - only when it's ~15F degrees or colder and blizzard-like conditions. So I'm pretty much in only baselayers with my eVent jacket and am plenty warm when skiing.

post #22 of 23

I needed the same type of jacket for my mtn bike commute...packable, windbreaker, waterproof, breathable, added category.....cheap!......... Go to Walmart and get a Stearns Dry wear Waterproof/Breatheable jacket. I've used mine for 2 yrs now in super rainy northern Vermont for Mtn biking to work as a windbreaker and rain jacket ..........super comfy, no stick, keeps me dry............If I crash and tear it or if I lose it ...........I'm out $28 bucks........... I hate Wallyworld though and try to keep my purchases there to a minimum.......but the jacket got rave reviews from customers and now I'm on board........got the pants too .............both stand up to cow manure, dirt roads and mud and work like a charm........

post #23 of 23

I have a Marmot Ion shell, which is super duper light. Packs down to about the size of a softball. I wouldn't trust it in a torrential downpour, but it works in light to regular rain and wind. Doesn't feel creepy on the inside to me, but YMMV.

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