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Can Anyone be an Expert Skier? - Page 4

post #91 of 102

I wasn't thinking specifically of Corbets' although that is a fine example of a place where lot's of not so great skiers line up to take some air.  As for Saratoga Bowl....  I completely agree that there are lots of great lines in there where a good skier, or boarder, could link up a great run that included some drop-offs.  Unforunatly the "kids" just want the airs and the whole bowl can be an endless series of traverses in between the hucks.  Most of these brutal traversers do the plop and drop style of air and most don't stick them and create craters in the LZ.  IMO it's sooo much easier to stick the air when you hit it with a little momentum and it's so much more fun for the air to be part of an "organic" line than a destination.  It also helps to know the lay of the land a bit when you get around to putting these types of lines together.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by CTKook View Post

re:  Corbet's and expert skiing, that would be a good example of the binary jump/no jump decision that doesn't necessarily require either a decent degree of skill, or even in some cases judgment.  But, Saratoga bowl, to take one easily accessible example, has drops of similar size to the smaller Corbet's entrance that you can link with other features like the rock gardens and trees there very aesthetically.  While it's difficult to define, some people have the eye to link these types of things together well.  And some people are boring.  But, you can develop a better eye.  As a standard, the test might be, can you take fun terrain and link a run that would be fun for other people to see?  Maybe not a ski-or-snowboard-god run, but a run where things are happening and people can see the terrain being used?  Fortunately this is accessible to pretty much everyone.

post #92 of 102

Welcome to epic Benfica!    Have some Mateus for me.

post #93 of 102

It is a nice Rosé, i will and the next ski week i'll buy a Helmet, fantastic skis those 2008 Grizzly's, i thank my dear father for the Judo lessons as a child otherwise a fall at (minimum) 60Miles/h i wouldn't be speaking that entusiastic, my untrained legs didn't old the g force of the turn full of spanish San Miguel beer, had to go. 20 years ago i saw Pirmin Zurbriggen doing it, now i'm trying to fly with style like he did(now i like Lara Gut the most). Just a tip, if you enjoy red, try one of Alentejo region( Borba, Reguengos) they'r usualy not that expensive and full of flavor. Thank's for the nice words.

post #94 of 102

 

Quote:
 With the exception of some sports, no characteristic of the brain or body constrains an individual from reaching an expert level.

 

 

http://www.fastcompany.com/magazine/110/final-word.html

post #95 of 102

"Deliberate practice" is the catch.  It's....not fun. 

 

Whether it's a golf driving range, a skatepark, a ski area, or wherever, if you watch people with some of this research in mind it's very striking, behaviorally, to see how different people use the same venues. 

 

Some grad student somewhere could even just observe something like terrain park or bump run usage, scoring things like "concentration frowns," "getting back on the horse," etc. and come  up with some interesting observations.  I'd expect you'd get "strivers" within most identifiable separate user groups, but probably odd clusters with a high percentage of strivers, sometimes in unlikely places.

 

Some coaches and instructors clearly also do a better job than other also bringing out the striver lurking inside ordinary packages. 

post #96 of 102
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
bringing out the striver lurking inside ordinary packages

That's a brilliant caption for this thread.

 

Conclusion: YES! Anyone can be an expert skier if they want it bad enough. 

post #97 of 102

I think it's also important to practice correctly.  It's very possible to become "expert" at doing the the wrong movement patterns.  I know that this was a problem for me when I was self taught.  I was very good compared to a lot of people, but was losing my enthusiasm for skiing because I was seriously stuck and wasn't as good I wanted to be and wasn't improving.  With some actual coaching and focused practice I was able to break off of that plateau and I am better than I was AND am currently improving.  I do however enjoy the focused practice sessions and the ability to master a movement and then incorporate it into my skiing so that I no longer need to think about it.  I run into some resistance from different trainers when I talk about using my "insect brain".  Basically when I am free skiing I don't think, but try to only react.  IMO the "voice" that many people seem to have running in their mind is not helpful.  For most people that voice seems to be negative and critical.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by CTKook View Post

"Deliberate practice" is the catch.  It's....not fun. 

 

Whether it's a golf driving range, a skatepark, a ski area, or wherever, if you watch people with some of this research in mind it's very striking, behaviorally, to see how different people use the same venues. 

 

Some grad student somewhere could even just observe something like terrain park or bump run usage, scoring things like "concentration frowns," "getting back on the horse," etc. and come  up with some interesting observations.  I'd expect you'd get "strivers" within most identifiable separate user groups, but probably odd clusters with a high percentage of strivers, sometimes in unlikely places.

 

Some coaches and instructors clearly also do a better job than other also bringing out the striver lurking inside ordinary packages. 

post #98 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by nolo View Post

 

That's a brilliant caption for this thread.

 

Conclusion: YES! Anyone can be an expert skier if they want it bad enough. 


================

Impossible since we cannot even agree what an expert skier is. 
 

post #99 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by pdiddy View Post


================

Impossible since we cannot even agree what an expert skier is. 
 



If you want it bad enough, it doesn't matter what an expert is becaus you'll keep working until you achieve it.

post #100 of 102

Almost anyone can be an expert skier.  Those expert skiers who have an over-inflated opinion of themselves will disagree.

post #101 of 102

One of the best lessons I ever got out of! 

 

I see her marching across the meeting area toward the school area and she is middle aged and has old long straight skis being held on her shoulders like a military rifle; there is a fellow following her in tow like an faithful canine companion.  She marches up to me and announces real loud "I am an expert skier and need an expert instructor" (she gestures to her faithful companion and almost takes off his head with her skis), "Him, he is an intermediate and will need a group lesson, you, are you an expert instructor?"

 

For once in my pathetic life I managed to stuff down my ego.

 

No, I'm not but I'll get you one and sir, you can follow me to the group desk.  I got assigned to a group like a level three or something and saw one of my buds doing a private with her.  She was out there doing expert turns hopping on those long straight skis like a bunny.  My buddy, the expert instructor was not smiling much.  I wonder if she gave him a nice tip?

 

You know they actually taught in the ski class for instructors on how to hustle tips?  Yeah, they said that towards the end of the lesson to start injecting the word .. tip .. as many times as you can like, "let me show you again how to tip the ski to get it to turn" or, "now let me leave you with a few important tips", or, "your weight should be forward toward the tips of the skis.."

 

  sorry I thought that tip stuff was a hoot and if you are out getting a lesson and hear this, do not laugh!

post #102 of 102

All of a sudden "Tips Go In First" makes a lot more sense.

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