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Does cycling alone do it ... or is more strength training req'd for skiing? - Page 2

post #31 of 208

I use my bike and roller blades as my off season workout. walk the dog every day for an hour and in september I hit the club  3 times a week for weights,core and balance till dec when I start skiing. I'm not a workout nut but take a casual approach to it all. I still think that skiing a hundred days or more a year is the way to go, Thats my dream anyway!!!

post #32 of 208
post #33 of 208
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dorm57 View Post

So ... in preparation for the upcoming season I've been spending a lot of time on the saddle, with road-MTB biking and/or spinning classes.  This works really well for me to build leg strength, quickness, stamina and overall conditioning. 

 

But my questions is ... does the biking "thaang" completely do it as far as building strength-stamina for skiing or is more training required?  I know this is a subjective question, but responses I'm interested in are what are most doing know in this regard?  What training supplements to biking (if any) are ones doing to prep for the upcoming season?

 

Ciao...

There are some great threads in the sports forums about rollerblading as summer cross training.  I don't do nearly enough of it though.

 

There is also a great thread about doing some agility ladder drills that is pretty good for quick feet and strength.

 

HA......look there, it was you who started the thread about quick feet!

http://www.epicski.com/forum/thread/74614/drill-to-get-quick-feet

 
 

post #34 of 208

Personally, as a "normal" skier, who doesn't need to (nor can) push the envelope to its limits, a "general, good fitness state" should do it.

I also like to do as many activities as possible, just because I like variety. Anyhow, IMHO no single activity "alone does it"

I find road cycling too dangerous, in my surroundings, and a bit too boring, even if I do recognize that it's a very good activity. I simply like MTB better, but I don't do  too much of that either. Just the minimum to "entertain" myself.

Inline skaters who compete, use road cycling as a complimentary activity, because it's very similar (or so they say) to the quadriceps use and wear, to skating...

I like swimming much more (as a kid that was my sport of choice, and, even if I agree that doing laps in a pool can be equally as boring, I am able to keep boredom at bay) I also like to skate,

But back to your  question, no, it's not enough, I'd complement it (again, if all you look at is "general fitness") with a skiing-tailored gym program. That's what I used to to years ago, and have resumed this spring.

In short, a lot comes down to personal preferences, there's a friend of mine who loves to play tennis, plus does a lot of at home spin bike

(in this I copied him and must say that my leg felt better while I was doing that than when I re-started  the ski gym program, since the instructor was "loading" my legs with exercises a bit too much)

post #35 of 208

I said it in another thread. I'll say it here. Crossfit.

post #36 of 208
Quote:
Originally Posted by ecimmortal View Post

I said it in another thread. I'll say it here. Crossfit.



post #37 of 208

I have found that lifting heavy really makes a difference.  High intensity training is also better than long slow distance.  But that's just me.  I hate to run.  I don't easily train endurance well by going long distance.  I think that cycling is probably not a bad thing, but constantly varied is where it's at in my training.  It's important to have activities, like swimming, kayaking, mt biking, rock climbing, hiking.  But they are activities.  Weight training, high intensity training and good nutrition are a requirement for a broad range of fitness.

 

No more machines for me except the Concept II rowing machine and the SkiErg.  Core work is naturally achieved with weights and the workout.  I have never used the Sker's Edge training machine, but it seems so limited and overly specific.  Maybe it could be a 3rd (additional) machine, but not to be used more than once or twice a week along with other exercises.  (constantly varied).

 

If you are going take up heavy weight lifting, it is important to not get hurt and to do it correctly.  This necessitates coaching and a gym that is set up for lifting - with a floor that can withstand heavy drops.

 

This can be a tall order for most gyms.  Look around and most places use machines and send you through a "routine".

post #38 of 208
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4ster View Post

I am not a very calculated fitness junkie, although I do stay fit.  I think it is best to mix it up.  Lots of different sports.  Nowdays for me it is mostly biking & 90% of that is MTB.  I used to SL waterski 100 days a year along with biking.  Those were the years that I was the most fit.  A good combination of aerobic & anerobic training.  I think MTBing is the best when it comes to biking especially if you are riding in hills & mountains.  It seems to have a built in intervals if you are willing to push it.  It also builds balance, reactions & agility on the downhills similar to skiing, it forces you to look & plan ahead.  I like to incorporate a day of cadence road biking now & then, it seems to really help my MTB endurance.

 

Most ski teams mix in a lot of weight training & plyometrics.  I seem to recall reading somewhere that when Hermann Maier came back from his leg injury, it was all about biking.

 

JF


Yes, Maier's program post-injury was to an incredible extent about simply biking, including lots of spinning at low intensity, and he credits moving away from heavy weights as a big part of his success.  Many ski teams now also emphasize plyos in particular less than they did, although people love to drag up plyo videos on Youtube to try to contradict this trend.  Of course, Maier's focus on low-intensity work is also incredibly boring.

 

There was a time in the 90's when some male racers (and also big mountain skiers) in particular seemed to get awfully big, and sometimes aggressive and with bad skin.  Aside from all the other issues discouraging this, I think one of the reasons it went away to an extent was that people realized that, for skiing, it could be counterproductive. 

post #39 of 208
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post



 

so how does standing the entire time get you more inshape than sitting more? is it faster? do you burn more calories? do you keep your heart rate up higher? 

 

or its a really misguided effort and training.

 

people dont listen to him, standing all the time, and advocating it is a good way to not get faster on a MTB or more inshape for the matter. 

 

==

Its WAY harder, will get your legs twice as strong and relates to running and skiing more than sitting and spinning.  Also when you do climbs you are forced to pull back on the handlbars because if you don't your rear wheel looses traction (because your weight is not on the back of your seat).      And of course you won't be faster during climbs while standing up, that is because its way harder.   It works your core as well.  Now if I had posted this on a mountain biking thread then everyone would say, "why do that it is way harder and you go slower" but we are talking about getting ready for skiing.    You will burn more calories in a shorter time,.   I suggest you go and do it prior to spouting off your junk.  Go pick your favorite mountain climb and try it.   

post #40 of 208

Personally, if I ride my bike to work (about 3.5 miles a day) three or four months of the off season, my legs maintain their strength from the previous season pretty well. This has been the case since I started skiing over 110 days per season (100+ lift-served and at least ten days post season skinning).

post #41 of 208
Quote:
Originally Posted by DonDenver View Post

Core…arrgh  

 

Enough with the core already!!

 

 

 

Quote:

The term “core”, "core workout" or “core training” as some magical target or Holy Grail for musculature improvement has been popularized primarily to disguise the hard work associated with weight bearing resistance training.

 

However; if moving ever increasing weight with your entire body fiber aligned and engaged, feet anchored as close to the earth as possible while it stresses and twists about your spine is how you define core training…have at it  

 

Note there is no core rather the deep muscle tissue throughout your body that is all intertwined, layered and connected from center to extremity.  Move your body as a unit equally pushing and pulling against the Earth’s core…the core that matters…as that resistance will take care of you head to foot.   



 

Isn't center just another word for core??  The only way to get in shape for skiing is well to.... ski. 
 

post #42 of 208
Quote:
Originally Posted by pdiddy View Post




 


dude I am not spounting off my junk. I am protecting people from misinfo. standing to climb isnt a bad thing sometimes I have to because I am riding a SS. You also sometime have to stand in tech sections.

 

but Standing as a goal even for fitness doesnt work. youll burn no more calories and you cant go as long. If you can go longer you eat into more fat reserves than short sprint sessions which is what 'a standing" will turn into for mostly anybody.

 

not only that will make people lose what they had MTBng. for instance if I stood all the time, youd eventually lose your seat power. Sometime on a SS there are hills that are steep/loose enough that no amount pulling up will let get up the hill. You have to sit down and deal with it. 

 

Also some of the stuff you say is laughable. IE it get your legs twice as strong. I have a 1600+ watt sprint. So if I stand all the time Id have a 3200 watt sprint? for how awesome that would be its also impossible. "Your forced to pull back on the handlebars." Sweet but if I was sitting I could just lower my chest and engage the glutes.

post #43 of 208

Plyo and inline skating.

 

http://www.iisa.org/resources/skate-to-ski.htm

 

I use a lougino 5 wheel skate.  If you buy now there almost all 100mm 4 wheel frames.  The hip angulation, knee bend is all very similar to skiing.  Even the rolling of the ankles.  I do specific drills that mock rolling the ski onto it's edge.

 

http://www.webersports.com/store/Luigino-Black-Sting-Pilot-Inline-Speed-Skates-09-P1855C186.aspx

inline skate

post #44 of 208

if you think skiing is the best exercise for skiing, then you are either out of shape or a poor skier, or both. 

 

1. The only thing worst than being weak, is being injured. 

 
2. Mobility and Function are on par with strenght, power and endurance. 
 
3. exercise is placing stress on the body, in a controlled setting. So the body can handle the demands of the real world.  
 
4. Crossfit is great, but a well designed plan, focusing on your goals is better. 
 
5. Core training is critical. Heavy resistance work is the primary work, core work is supplemental. Primary work alone is great for beginners, but an experienced athlete needs more than squats and deads.  
 
6. Jump squats are the single best exercise for skiing. All rep ranges. 

Edited by surfacehoar - 8/24/10 at 9:23am
post #45 of 208


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post




dude I am not spounting off my junk. I am protecting people from misinfo. standing to climb isnt a bad thing sometimes I have to because I am riding a SS. You also sometime have to stand in tech sections...


In terms of fitness and the up, what you say is correct.  To clarify what you are saying for "tech sections" and or the down, I think you're taking for granted that people will be out of the saddle.  I see lots of weekend or casual riders staying in the saddle on the down when they should never be there.  Even for rolling singletrack, a good rule of thumb when going downhill is to pin it enough that you use the saddle for leverage but virtually never to sit on.

 

For longer epics (as in epic rides, not the forum) or more of a XC focus this varies a bit, but for crosstraining benefit for skiing being out of the saddle and flowing with the trail is the way to go.  Pedalling efficiency and conditioning don't call for this at all, but movement-wise it's what works.

post #46 of 208
Quote:
Originally Posted by surfacehoar View Post

if you think skiing is the best exercise for skiing, then you are either out of shape or a poor skier, or both. 

 

1. The only thing being worst than weak, is being injured. 

 
2. Mobility and Function are on par with strenght, power and endurance. 
 
3. exercise is placing stress on the body, in a controlled setting. So the body can handle the demands of the real world.  
 
4. Crossfit is great, but a well designed plan, focusing on your goals is better



Crossfit is scalable, flexible, and easily tailored to your goals. As ski season closes in I have been moving away from the suggested workout of the day to WOD's that focus more on my upcoming needs. Or subbing/adding excersizes that focus on lower body fitness while stil doing the ones the add core strength.

post #47 of 208

i would reccomend getting yourself a bosuball and a couple medicine balls and youtube some strengthening exercises there is a lot of cool exercises to help you recover if your about to crash...it will most likely save you a few times

post #48 of 208



IM goint to reply between your paragraphs,

Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post




dude I am not spounting off my junk. I am protecting people from misinfo. standing to climb isnt a bad thing sometimes I have to because I am riding a SS. You also sometime have to stand in tech sections.

 =====

+++Until you try an entire climb standing up, you can't be sure of what you are talking about, I think that is fair,  The only misinfo is the FACT that you are talking about something you CLEARLY don't do.  So on you next ride, DON"T SIT, and do a small semi steep climb, something like a mile long with about 550 vertical climb.  When you get to the top, DON'T SIT then finish your ride, DON"T SIT.   Then next time add a longer climb but equally as steep.  (I have one by my house that a Mile long and 900 vertical, it's a killer, I usually do it first or last).   I have ridden everything sitting and standing and I can tell you that FOR SURE, its harder standing.   What you will find is that your back, side, arms and legs are all screaming.  (which is a big calorie burn, last time I checked). 

=====

but Standing as a goal even for fitness doesnt work. youll burn no more calories and you cant go as long. If you can go longer you eat into more fat reserves than short sprint sessions which is what 'a standing" will turn into for mostly anybody.

=====

+++And the fact that you just said, "YOU CAN"T GO AS LONG" means it harder and you just admitted it...   I do my whole MTB ride standing, including all the climbs.

My friends slowly pass me on the climbs but all think I'm nuts for standing and have tried it only to find out its really hard .  I run for Cardio and ride for strength. Get it???

===== 

not only that will make people lose what they had MTBng. for instance if I stood all the time, youd eventually lose your seat power. Sometime on a SS there are hills that are steep/loose enough that no amount pulling up will let get up the hill. You have to sit down and deal with it. 

 =====

+++I could care less about loosing seat power when I am TRAINING FOR SKIING.

Dude,,,,

=====

Also some of the stuff you say is laughable. IE it get your legs twice as strong. I have a 1600+ watt sprint. So if I stand all the time Id have a 3200 watt sprint? for how awesome that would be its also impossible. "Your forced to pull back on the handlebars." Sweet but if I was sitting I could just lower my chest and engage the glutes.


===

+++You are talking about effecient Mountain biking, and I'm talking about getting into better shape for skiing.      I'm not talking about sprinting at all, in fact I even addressed it as spinning on my post, same thing in my mind.   If your pulling back on the handle bars to transfer your weight back so the wheel doesn't slip and alternating weight from leg to leg while doing so which in turn makes you pull harder on the handlebar from the opposite arm, THAT IS CORE.     I'm actually really surprised that you jumped into this, since you clearly do a lot of biking.   

So now I will address why I stand, aside from building leg/core strength.   I found out a long time ago, (as have most people) that you can bike your ass off for months, but running/skiing are really different (didn't prepare me much).   When I started standing the entire time I found that I could bike my ass off standing and then go running/skiing and it seemed easier, BINGO.   So I figure it MAY work for others as well.   I don't think anyone is going to DIE trying my info.....   And you can sit everyother ride to keep your sit strength.

:)

post #49 of 208



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ecimmortal View Post





Crossfit is scalable, flexible, and easily tailored to your goals. As ski season closes in I have been moving away from the suggested workout of the day to WOD's that focus more on my upcoming needs. Or subbing/adding excersizes that focus on lower body fitness while stil doing the ones the add core strength.

Plus, most other places just don't do heavy lifting.  Crossfit is serious training in a group setting.  You will have a very hard time finding personal trainers who can deliver what Crossfit does.  It's effective and a lot of fun because of the setting. 

 

post #50 of 208

Quote:

Originally Posted by loboskis View Post

 

 

 Thank you

It’s nice to read a “thank you” on this forum.

You’re welcome!


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Jones View Post

 It's important to have activities, like swimming, kayaking, mt biking, rock climbing, hiking.  But they are activities.  Weight training, high intensity training and good nutrition are a requirement for a broad range of fitness.

 

 

Thank you

 



 

post #51 of 208

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

cycling is a poor core workout, so you have to target the core in some form.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by vail snopro View Post

Hmmmm...  Though I agree with the workouts Don Denver has suggested, I'm going to have to disagree on one point. And yes, Don, I'm going to talk about the CORE!

 

Since the core is the transmission in skiing (the torso is the engine, the legs and feet are the shocks and wheels), developing it is essential! Absolute control of the core offers more options while skiing difficult conditions and terrain. For example- if you are skiing bumps aggressively, what muscle groups control the rate that you retract your legs/feet? Oh ya... it's the core!

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ske-Bum View Post

Isn't center just another word for core??  The only way to get in shape for skiing is well to.... ski. 
 

Core is a wonderful metaphor  

 

The area of our body that protects our vitals, keeps us from ripping apart at the waist when we twist about, insures our spine does not snap while bending in any direction and anchors all our limbs has many names to describe it.  Core is a fine discription...

 

…but eliminate the term core from your exercise vocabulary if ever thinking to improve it.  The inside working outward paradigm derived from metaphors and references such as core training, core focus, working the core, etc., actually retards many from meaningful improvement for that very area.  From our breastplate down to the top of our thighs is too broad an area as well as much too complex physiologically to specifically target or focus or otherwise train “it” in a balanced method.  Simply; the core is not improved by something like crunches, dancing about swinging your arms with light weight, single purpose linear Nautilus machines or standing on top of a bosu ball in some karate kid pose. Rather you engage and activate the core by your limbs working strenuously moving your body and additional heavy carrying weight.  By that work your core is better prepared to be further honed by the movements of your athletic interests, whatever they are.  The Skier’s Edge mentioned earlier is a great example of a method to improve the capacity of the body’s core movement patterns closely imitating that of actual skiing.  Good stuff.  However, the Skiers Edge will do nothing to help your body prepare to best survive the impact and shearing forces of a fall.

 

Do those exercises that just stink of hard work and that incorporate your extremities in compound movements with the load opposing you in multiple dimensions.  Anything short of that and you’re compromising.  Perform at a strenuous rate which causes you to stop breathing at maximum capacity.  Learn Olympic power lifting.  Train with Russian Kettlebells.  Practice squats, dead lifts, bench press, standing military press.  Balance each pushing or expanding move with a pulling or contracting movement.  Move your body weight explosively in plyometric routines.  Practice Yoga.  Use a high density foam roller.  Know your body type and how to work to maximize it.  Outwork others.  And when you are confused as to how to move about in a gym with weight just remember to mimic what the human animal was designed to do; run, stop, jump and hang.  Doing all that at high pace and with purpose will engage and activate your core section in complex and multidimensional ways that’ll improve your ability to anchor and manage the variable loads life and activities throw at you.  Don’t give up.  You’ll see improvements over time.  You’ll find your motivation.  You’ll also fight back bone and muscle tissue loss as well as eliminate that lard around your middle.  You’ll live, sport and love at a higher rate.    

 

Oh, and make it a lifestyle.  I rolled my eyes when I read somewhere on this thread that there are 2 months before skiing and we need to get ready for it…well, sorry…you’re 10 months behind your potential.  There are no shortcuts: 

 

I see a commercial the other night with a tag line “the easiest way to get in shape without work”.  Now that’s one hell of a shortcut!  Reminds me of; “I’ll ski myself into shape”.  Yeah, that’s a good one     



 

post #52 of 208

Don - Thank You!   Excellent post.

 

 

 

My bicycle weighs more then a better bike, and is a bit harder to ride then a more expensive one.

 

My comment about that is "would a weight lifter want lighter and easier to lift weights?" 

post #53 of 208



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DonDenver View Post

 

Core is a wonderful metaphor  

 

The area of our body that protects our vitals, keeps us from ripping apart at the waist when we twist about, insures our spine does not snap while bending in any direction and anchors all our limbs has many names to describe it.  Core is a fine discription...

 

…but eliminate the term core from your exercise vocabulary if ever thinking to improve it.  The inside working outward paradigm derived from metaphors and references such as core training, core focus, working the core, etc., actually retards many from meaningful improvement for that very area.  From our breastplate down to the top of our thighs is too broad an area as well as much too complex physiologically to specifically target or focus or otherwise train “it” in a balanced method.  Simply; the core is not improved by something like crunches, dancing about swinging your arms with light weight, single purpose linear Nautilus machines or standing on top of a bosu ball in some karate kid pose. Rather you engage and activate the core by your limbs working strenuously moving your body and additional heavy carrying weight.  By that work your core is better prepared to be further honed by the movements of your athletic interests, whatever they are.  The Skier’s Edge mentioned earlier is a great example of a method to improve the capacity of the body’s core movement patterns closely imitating that of actual skiing.  Good stuff.  However, the Skiers Edge will do nothing to help your body prepare to best survive the impact and shearing forces of a fall.

 

Do those exercises that just stink of hard work and that incorporate your extremities in compound movements with the load opposing you in multiple dimensions.  Anything short of that and you’re compromising.  Perform at a strenuous rate which causes you to stop breathing at maximum capacity.  Learn Olympic power lifting.  Train with Russian Kettlebells.  Practice squats, dead lifts, bench press, standing military press.  Balance each pushing or expanding move with a pulling or contracting movement.  Move your body weight explosively in plyometric routines.  Practice Yoga.  Use a high density foam roller.  Know your body type and how to work to maximize it.  Outwork others.  And when you are confused as to how to move about in a gym with weight just remember to mimic what the human animal was designed to do; run, stop, jump and hang.  Doing all that at high pace and with purpose will engage and activate your core section in complex and multidimensional ways that’ll improve your ability to anchor and manage the variable loads life and activities throw at you.  Don’t give up.  You’ll see improvements over time.  You’ll find your motivation.  You’ll also fight back bone and muscle tissue loss as well as eliminate that lard around your middle.  You’ll live, sport and love at a higher rate.    

 

Oh, and make it a lifestyle.  I rolled my eyes when I read somewhere on this thread that there are 2 months before skiing and we need to get ready for it…well, sorry…you’re 10 months behind your potential.  There are no shortcuts: 

 

I see a commercial the other night with a tag line “the easiest way to get in shape without work”.  Now that’s one hell of a shortcut!  Reminds me of; “I’ll ski myself into shape”.  Yeah, that’s a good one     



 


Wait a minute.  Wait just a darn minute.  You mean there isn't an easy button to getting and staying in shape?  I can't just buy some miracle product and make it all easy?  Damnit. 

 

Seriously though, great post, thank you.  The reminder to "outwork others" and "make it a lifestyle" took me far too long to understand and even now some times I just have to push harder than I think I want to at that moment.  I'm always disappointed when I hear people talk about an end point to whatever training goal they have. To me each race or event is a midpoint.  Something to measure against next year.  There is no stopping. 

 

I'm far from perfect in both my workouts and nutrition and I know that.  But every time I do another hill repeat, add mile to my long run (up to 12 miles this weekend!) or push a little harder in a speed workout I know that it adds power to my skiing, days to my life and life to my days. 
 

Don, you and Betsy are 2 of my role models in this regard.  I don't even closely approach where you both are in these aspects but I aspire to one day and for that I thank you.  Never mind that you're both fantastic ski buddies! 

 

Now to get ready for a 60 minute hill tempo run tonight.  (In my head will be moguls, moguls, moguls). 

post #54 of 208

So what does this have to do with skiing?

post #55 of 208
Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post

So what does this have to do with skiing?



Seriously?  You don't understand what running, cycling, weight lifting, rollerblading etc has to do with skiing? 

post #56 of 208

Not really. I ski and ride my bike and hike beucase I enjoy those activities. I used to Run but gave it up after I kept injuring myself and haven't run a mile in 3 years. Also haven't been in a gym since 2001. I think MTB and skiing have helped accustomize me to doing "unnatural activities" in exposed palces. But they are different activites. I don't think there is any relationship between these activies except that I do them. How does lifting weight make you a better skier? How does it improve your bike riding? I just don't see it.


Edited by tromano - 8/24/10 at 3:13pm
post #57 of 208

I'd be willing to bet that if you took to similar skiers and gave them a year, had one do nothing other than ski during the season and had the other ski during the season plus add in other activities like weight lifting, cycling, running etc you'd see a difference.  I know that I feel a huge difference from when I did nothing to now when I do lots of stuff.  Skiing is easier, more fun, my endurance is better etc.  Sure, if you could regularly ski year round one might not need to add other activities but for the vast majority of us that's just not the case. 

post #58 of 208

Resistance training builds a stronger all around body.  This is a good thing.  If it wasn't valuable then you wouldn't see videos of Olympic skiers doing it.  

 

The stronger I am, the more muscles I have the more my body can do demanding things of all types.  I'm not talking about hulk like muscles mind you.  80 lb barbells lifted overhead, curls, triceps skull crushers are very good exercise.  

post #59 of 208
Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post

Not really. I ski and ride my bike and hike beucase I enjoy those activities. I used to Run but gave it up after I kept injuring myself and haven't run a mile in 3 years. Also haven't been in a gym since 2001. I think MTB and skiing have helped accustomize me to doing "unnatural activities" in exposed palces. But they are different activites. I don't think there is any relationship between these activies except that I do them. How does lifting weight make you a better skier? How does it improve your bike riding? I just don't see it.


You've hit the specificity nail on the head.  

 

(I personally think there is some movement crossover from, say, MTB to skiing, but it's also true that MTBer's can't ski, unless they already ski...)

 

post #60 of 208
Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post

Not really. I ski and ride my bike and hike beucase I enjoy those activities. I used to Run but gave it up after I kept injuring myself and haven't run a mile in 3 years. Also haven't been in a gym since 2001. I think MTB and skiing have helped accustomize me to doing "unnatural activities" in exposed palces. But they are different activites. I don't think there is any relationship between these activies except that I do them. How does lifting weight make you a better skier? How does it improve your bike riding? I just don't see it.

 

May I ask, How old are you?
 

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