EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Does cycling alone do it ... or is more strength training req'd for skiing?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Does cycling alone do it ... or is more strength training req'd for skiing? - Page 7

post #181 of 208

Crossfit.com  or try my group - Albanycrossfit.com  It's quite an organization and it has it's detractors.  It's world wide and the level of fitness that is attained is amazing.  But it's by no means perfect.  They run a hell of an operation and incorporate nutrition in a big way.  Paleo/Zone - I just do what I am told and it's been successful beyond any expectation that I had going in.  I don't want to knock other programs or personal trainers, but I know this way of training and it's wild.  Crossfit WODs are done in group and that is real fun.  The coaching at my club is extremely qualified and constantly attending certifications.  Great people and great place to train.  You can also do Crossfit on line.

 

 

 

 

See below, it's not Crossfit but it is a sample of what our strength training strives towards.


Edited by Paul Jones - 9/6/10 at 3:45pm
post #182 of 208

<object style="height: 344px; width: 425px"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/tXN4Ogf3eHg?version=3"><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"><param name="allowScriptAccess" value="always"><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/tXN4Ogf3eHg?version=3" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" allowScriptAccess="always" width="425" height="344"></object>

post #183 of 208
Thread Starter 


So clue us in on your routine ... what's the typical week's schedule for your workouts; what's your exercise plan each day and using the crossfit list which exercises do you do each day?

Quote:
Originally Posted by ecimmortal View Post
http://www.crossfitbrandx.com/index.php/forums/viewforum/16/

 

I know I sound like I have totally drank to koolaid. But I told myself i would give it a month, after a week i knew I was never going back to traditional boring workout's that didn't net me real results.

post #184 of 208

So just a kind of summary statement before I go to bed.

 

All of us are rocking it.  Whatever we're doing.  We're picking up heavy things, we're stretching our body beyond the limits of what we could do yesterday, we're getting stronger and more fit.

 

It really doesn't matter how we do it - at least not in comparison to NOT doing it at all, like most people.

 

Goals are the key, we set goals for ourselves and try to accomplish them.  

 

Kudos to all of you who are taking steps to become stronger, physically and mentally, and who are increasing your ability to reach your goals.

 

Reach one and the next one will present itself.

 

Dare to dream.  Dare to achieve.

post #185 of 208

Our WODs are posted on AlbanyCrossfit.com,  You can follow them and learn lot and not even do them.

 

Today was Stephen:

 

10 burpees, 200m run, 30 air squats - ten rounds.  About 25 min - a long workout.

 

Saturday was:

 

2 min burpees

2 min rest

2 min power cleans (that's floor to rack position ie bar at shoulder height and down)

2 min push jerks (that's shoulders to over head)

2 min rest

2 min burpees

 

Count the total reps for all.  I used 95# some used 115#

 

It was a 12 min WOD

 

 

Keep in mind, the warm-up is serious and the after party can kick your butt too.

 

One more.

 

Tuesday we did:

 

12 Hang power cleans (that is from arms straight, hanging down to thighs then to rack position)  115#

24 sit-ups.  Five rounds.

 

You can go to the web site and go to WOD and they list each day's WOD along with a demo video of the lift or movement.  You get to see what is in store for you and who is coaching.  Very cool.

 

Oh wait, you didn't ask me

post #186 of 208

Me, I just drop acid every morning, get down on all fours, and go rabbit hunting with my dog.  

 

The neighbors get really upset about the howling ruckus we make.

 

But I'm in pretty good shape.

post #187 of 208

Far out man

 

It will also help you become more focused.

 

have you tried the cool-aid.


Edited by Paul Jones - 9/7/10 at 10:15am
post #188 of 208

hey there weems-

interesting training regime man

not sure the kids would like that one ! lol

 

still for me as posted above you just cant beat a solid mtb 

gut wheel, swiss ball with pilates /body weight exercises and hitting the punching bag or focus pads 

 

will let the crew know about weems method tho - could be a few takers !

 

chur for now

sb

post #189 of 208

hey there weems-

interesting training regime man

not sure the kids would like that one ! lol

 

still for me as posted above you just cant beat a solid mtb 

gut wheel, swiss ball with pilates /body weight exercises and hitting the punching bag or focus pads 

 

will let the crew know about weems method tho - could be a few takers !

 

chur for now

sb

post #190 of 208

hey there weems-

interesting training regime man

not sure the kids would like that one ! lol

 

still for me as posted above you just cant beat a solid mtb 

gut wheel, swiss ball with pilates /body weight exercises and hitting the punching bag or focus pads 

 

will let the crew know about weems method tho - could be a few takers !

 

chur for now

sb

post #191 of 208

exstream, you might enjoy looking up the matchstick film where some of the guys who the term exstreme was practically brought into skiing for, spoof the very use of it. me, I'm sick to death of it, honestly. just sayin'

 

+1 mtb with supplemental core, livin' in the mountains, how could I spend time indoors  even if it was a gym? 

post #192 of 208
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

livin' in the mountains, how could I spend time indoors  even if it was a gym? 


Thats what I am saying. To me the great thing about MTB is that its an activity that gets you out into the forest, and is challenging and so fun that it keeps me coming back for more every week all season long, and is also rewarding from a fitness standpoint. I think the key is to have have activites that you love and keep active 12 months a year. And to me skiing and MTB and both fits right into that along with a few other things.

 

I do way more Destiation MTB trips in the than I do destiation skiing trips in the winter. Park city / Uintas 3-4 weekends a summer and then Southern UT / Moab maybe 3-4 more weekends in spring and fall a year.

post #193 of 208

davluri

not quite sure where you are going with the post?

feel free to enlighten me -

as a sponsor and partner of epic kinda keen to keep the vibe positive like

post #194 of 208

i am with you tromano

living in the city has its upside - but if i can bolt from work and hit the forest, hills etc and burn the muscles with nature i am a happy chappy

then again if its cold and wet i am into the basics mentioned above

be interesting thread as to which athletes are the fittest ?

boxers, fmx riders, ironmen/women - guess its a matter for the forum to debate

 

heading north again in the weekend hopefully weather holds so MTB can be utilised

then off to raro tonga to hit the sun. sans bike 

 

catch you 

post #195 of 208

Truth be known.  

 

I like all bikes....road, mountain, motor.

 

I also absolutely have to work my stomach (all sides) and butt for me to have any chance of even walking out of pain, much less skiing effectively.

 

And if I don't stretch, then I don't stay upright long.

 

To practice finesse and focus, I play my guitar.  (badly! but I work on it)

post #196 of 208

Haha, I assumed your username was a reference to Shane McConkey, a former stream skier who used to ski down streams, including some sick drops. He could ski a lot of stuff a semi-compentent white water kayaker would balk at! After he quit stream skiing he sort of sat on his laurels and called himself an ex-stream skier to make fun of the guys who called themselves extreme skiers. The snow skiers were years behind doing on snow what Shane did in the mountain streams! He later revolutionized the sport of backcountry saucering. 
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by exstreamtv View Post

i am with you tromano

living in the city has its upside - but if i can bolt from work and hit the forest, hills etc and burn the muscles with nature i am a happy chappy

then again if its cold and wet i am into the basics mentioned above

be interesting thread as to which athletes are the fittest ?

boxers, fmx riders, ironmen/women - guess its a matter for the forum to debate

 

heading north again in the weekend hopefully weather holds so MTB can be utilised

then off to raro tonga to hit the sun. sans bike 

 

catch you 

post #197 of 208

I don't know about the rest of you, but to me skiing is not enough.  I usually enter the ski season at my fittest, & then I slowly loose it as the season goes on.  I do ski hard everyday & stay in great "ski shape" but not much beyond that.  I do my best to supplement it with ridge hikes, some backcountry & hopefully a lot of snow shoveling, but still find my overall/aerobic conditioning suffers.  As I get older I am trying to get motivated to supplement the skiing with some other wintertime activities, like skate skiing or "god forbid" going to the gym.  After a day of skiing, it is hard to find the energy.  Like Weems, if I didn't start the day with some general calisthenics & stretching, I wouldn't make it to the lift.  Once the skiing ends, it seems like I spend the off season getting it back.

 

Maybe this should be another thread:  Is skiing enough?

 

JF

post #198 of 208
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Jones View Post


How about some examples?
 


In response to my comment: "I like to see skiers doing strength work and corrective exercises to address whatever movement issues they have."

 

I meant to go back and reply to this but then got sidetracked...

 

For strength, I think I like a lot of the same things you do: squats and Romanian deadlifts for starters. Pretty much I like compound movements but augmented with specific activations for muscles that are typically under-fired, such as glute medius.  For corrective exercises, I think working on the hips is huge - both rotation and flexion/extension.  I also like to work the ankles even though they are in boots all day. In fact partly because they are in boots all day, I want to make sure we are still functional there as trouble at the knee is often the result of trouble at the ankles (or hips).  Then I like to work thoracic spine region, primarily because the ski posture can contribute to overall poor posture, and together can wreak havoc on our necks and lower back.  As an example, here are the exercises from the "Day One" "Movement Prep" section in my new ski training program (shameless plug: http://customstrength.com/skiprogram.html):

 

 

 

 

Movement PrepHoldReps

Foam roll - All3m1

Ankle mobility (toe on wall calf stretch)5s5

Leg swings (Fore/aft)1s5

Leg swings (Rotational)1s5

Half-kneeling hip flexor lunge stretch10s3

Sidelying quad stretch10s3

Mountain climber3s10

Walking single leg Romanian deadlifts1s5

Spiderman walks with rotation1s5

 

Hope that helps.

 

Elsbeth


Edited by evaino - 9/12/10 at 3:48pm
post #199 of 208
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4ster View Post

I don't know about the rest of you, but to me skiing is not enough.  I usually enter the ski season at my fittest, & then I slowly loose it as the season goes on.  I do ski hard everyday & stay in great "ski shape" but not much beyond that.  I do my best to supplement it with ridge hikes, some backcountry & hopefully a lot of snow shoveling, but still find my overall/aerobic conditioning suffers...

JF


Wow, there seems to be a lot of really fit people here. I'm sure a high level of fitness improves one's ability to ski well, but I wonder how much. If the people you are trying to keep up with are very fit, I guess it's necessary to be fit also.

 

Telemark skiing is the hardest exercise I do. I usually do it alone though, at my own pace.

 

I can't imagine doing harder exercise in preparation for skiing. Skiing is the closest I get to working out.

 

One of the things I love about skiing is it doesn't require a high level of fitness.

 

I use a bicycle for transportation and on rare occasions for recreation, never for exercise. I sometimes push myself a little harder by telling myself it will improve my skiing...

post #200 of 208

Body by Backyard

10_BeStrongBackyard.jpg

Step through the exercises with yellow buttons on top left of web page

post #201 of 208

jc-ski, that's a great workout, just what I've been looking for!  The website works so badly that I printed to PDF all of the individual screens.  I can't seem to attach that here, but if anyone wants it, PM me.

post #202 of 208

Blah blah blah, yap yap yap.  That is what you hear when you ask such a question.

 

The best workout regiment for skiing is ninjitsu.   Instead of lifting weights or riding a bicycle last year, I trained exclusively in ninjitsu.

 

The end result?  First off, I didn't have to pay any money for lift tickets.  My ninja training allowed me to sneak on and off of lifts without alerting the lift operators.

Second, my reflexes were the best they had ever been.   No need to worry about sudden ice patches mid-carve or getting run into by touron-soccer-moms. As a ninja, you can sense these things with plenty of time to react and make the proper adjustments.

Third, my conditioning was top notch.  Nothing gets you in shape faster than ninja training!

 

Having said all that, there are some disadvantages

Gear - I had to buy all new gear.  All white outfits, all black outfits, all grey outfits, etc... including skis to make sure that I could blend in to my surroundings.  THEN there was all the weaponry (swords, kunai, etc).  The only items I was able to reuse were my socks and balaclavas

Enemy clans - If you think that the skier/snowboarder rift is bad... then just imagine the rivalry between ninja clans.  It can be pretty bad (the swords aren't just for show)... few things are worse than getting caught up in a ninja duel on a powder day.

Avalanches - You really have to be careful with the smoke bombs if you go off piste.  Setting off an avalanche when you are trying to vanish usually has the opposite effect (don't ask me how I know).

 

 

 

post #203 of 208
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tarzanman View Post

Blah blah blah, yap yap yap.  That is what you hear when you ask such a question.

 

The best workout regiment for skiing is ninjitsu.   Instead of lifting weights or riding a bicycle last year, I trained exclusively in ninjitsu.

 

The end result?  First off, I didn't have to pay any money for lift tickets.  My ninja training allowed me to sneak on and off of lifts without alerting the lift operators.

Second, my reflexes were the best they had ever been.   No need to worry about sudden ice patches mid-carve or getting run into by touron-soccer-moms. As a ninja, you can sense these things with plenty of time to react and make the proper adjustments.

Third, my conditioning was top notch.  Nothing gets you in shape faster than ninja training!

 

Having said all that, there are some disadvantages

Gear - I had to buy all new gear.  All white outfits, all black outfits, all grey outfits, etc... including skis to make sure that I could blend in to my surroundings.  THEN there was all the weaponry (swords, kunai, etc).  The only items I was able to reuse were my socks and balaclavas

Enemy clans - If you think that the skier/snowboarder rift is bad... then just imagine the rivalry between ninja clans.  It can be pretty bad (the swords aren't just for show)... few things are worse than getting caught up in a ninja duel on a powder day.

Avalanches - You really have to be careful with the smoke bombs if you go off piste.  Setting off an avalanche when you are trying to vanish usually has the opposite effect (don't ask me how I know).

 

 

 

HIGH quality post.
 

post #204 of 208
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tarzanman View Post

Blah blah blah, yap yap yap.  That is what you hear when you ask such a question.

 

The best workout regiment for skiing is ninjitsu.  

 

 

This made me laugh.  Good job!

 

And thanks jc-ski for the backyard workout.  I've been trying to set up a version of this around my house and it helps give some suggestions of more things I can add.
 

post #205 of 208
Quote:
Originally Posted by jc-ski View Post

Body by Backyard

10_BeStrongBackyard.jpg

Step through the exercises with yellow buttons on top left of web page


If I had a backyard I would be all over that. My apartment in downtown Portland lacks fine facilities such as that.

 

I am working on a selection of simple equipment to free myself of a gym membership. I will lack  weight bars, but it will just force me to work harder with what I have and be more creative.

post #206 of 208
Quote:

Originally Posted by ecimmortal View Post

If I had a backyard I would be all over that. My apartment in downtown Portland lacks fine facilities such as that.

 

Portland's kinda woodsy - maybe something nearby?

 

I am working on a selection of simple equipment to free myself of a gym membership. I will lack  weight bars, but it will just force me to work harder with what I have and be more creative.

 

Amazing what you can do with just your own body weight, and maybe a balance pad, chin bar, and a couple of dumbbells.

post #207 of 208

Training Tips with Ted Ligety: Week 1

The first episode in a six-part workout series from Olympic gold medalist Ted
Ligety and the U.S. Ski Team. This week's exercise: weighted squat jumps.
post #208 of 208

i saw some good ski training videos (see youtube under down hill

ski training exercises...or some similar search)

and this ski team was running down a hill side to side

..mimicing the effects of gravity/exertion on the legs, which made

perfect sense to me in simulating the muscles and directional forces  used in skiing.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Does cycling alone do it ... or is more strength training req'd for skiing?