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What determines your ski purchase?

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 

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Edited by slider - 1/30/11 at 4:00pm
post #2 of 26

It's about what the ski was designed to do, what I want the ski to do, and Cost.  Last purchase was Völkl P50F1 for $50 +25 for shipping.  Bindings cost me about double that.

post #3 of 26

Cost is allways a factor, BUT I look first at which ski brand is better in my opinion for the purpose it was designed.. Then go from there..

But if you want top of the line 2011 skis regardless of their specs/SL, GS, FATS/, then you have to shell out the dough... I do not buy used skis, unless I've seen them in person.

post #4 of 26

I look for skis that I think I will like, I demo if at all possible and also look for ones that have solid reviews. Then I start looking for whats available and at what price. So far I have never skied a ski that was so awesome that I clearly had to have it imediately no matter the cost.

 

I really don't have a problem with buying used skis if I trust the source, that its in good condition.  

post #5 of 26

A cheap deal is not a good deal, unless it is a good pair of skis for your needs.  If something is dirt cheap I might buy it to try it, but the price would have to be so low as to make them disposable. 

 

Life is too short to ski on the wrong skis.

post #6 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by mudfoot View Post

Life is too short to ski on the wrong skis.

Quoted for truth!
 

post #7 of 26

price, length, width, tip,tail, rocker, camber, base material, sidewall construction, recommended mounting point, graphics, brand, flex, weight, construction blemishes, wear-resistance, core material.

 

 

 

 

post #8 of 26

The way it looks....you know graphics/colors...etc!  I'm a girl what can I say! 

 

Just kidding....it is usually the price, brand, dimensions, opinions of others, reviews, etc! 

post #9 of 26

Cost + waist + sidecut.  I have found that demo-ing skis is deceiving.  3-4 runs on a pair of skis doesn't really tell you how they're going to ski for you over the long haul.  I've paid $60 for a brand new pair of slalom carvers, under $200 for all-mtn twin-tips, under $300 for some Nordica ABs with bindings that I had demo'ed and thought I would love...like, yes, love, no.  My favorites: in the east, the $60 slalom carvers, anywhere else, the under $200 all-mtn twins.  I demo'ed some RC4 WC GS and fell in love. Still only paid $300 for them.  I skied on them for half a season and unloaded them...they were too specialized although great fun for about 5 runs per day.

 

Anybody know where to get a cheap pair of mogul skis?

post #10 of 26

1 - identify needs

2 - identify skis that fit the need

3 - sort the skis based on research

4 - if my top choice is barely ahead of my second choice, but costs twice as much, discard that one

5 - focus on the top remaining skis

 

But if I have a few skis I'm equally interested in, I might make an impulse purchase of one of the skis from that group.

 

In terms of brand ... I think every manufacturer makes good skis ... I personally have a bias against Rossignol (no rational reason, I just do ... no offense to Rossi fans), and in favor of Volkl and Fischer. But that's just one factor among many.

post #11 of 26

I'm filling a need for a certain niche, conditions and terrain.

Then I go to a brand that has served me well and see what they have for that niche.

I will tend toward stiffer skis with lots of dampening.

Then I learn its quirks and ski it for many years, right through it's place as a rock ski.

Last purchase: Dynastar Sixth Sense H.

post #12 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by mudfoot View Post

A cheap deal is not a good deal, unless it is a good pair of skis for your needs.  If something is dirt cheap I might buy it to try it, but the price would have to be so low as to make them disposable. 

 

Life is too short to ski on the wrong skis.



Sort of.  Not really.  If you have at least ballpark the right skis for the conditions, and you aren't having fun, perhaps it is operator error?  Also, how the hell will you know if they are the 'wrong skis' unless you spend your whole life trying new skis and finding out that you might like something better?  That said, I know what you mean.  I am not going to buy a pair of 170 slalom skis even if they are a great deal, because I don't care about slalom skiing.

 

In response to the OP, the first consideration is:  How versatile will this ski be for me personally?  Do I think it would be good for more than 50 percent of the time?  The next factor for me is quality, which I have muddled with my preference for more unique, handmade skis.  Cost and graphics also play in, but they fall after these other two.  I think this is a good way to start ski shopping- think about the conditions that you ski most of the time.  Look for something that does really well in those conditions, and can handle most other conditions pretty well.  Unfortunately for me, because I am a gear maniac, that means I have like 4 pairs of skis that all fill the same quiver slot.  HA! 

 

post #13 of 26

Understand that I am a Gear Whore and justify ? pair quiver for season.

Look at current quiver and decide where I can squeeze another pair in.

Research skis in said dimensions and figure out how much I can/want to spend.

Patiently wait for end of season sales or preseason sales.

$$ for new is hopefully $400 or less.

$ for nice used is usually around $250-$300, as that typically includes bindings and mounting.

In this seasons quiver I wanted to try a high 90 waist ski.

Sadly, the Movement Sluffs I wanted never got lower than $519 new, so scored some nice used 183 Bros instead.

This seasons opening quiver equals 6 pair.

post #14 of 26

 

Quote:
 

1 - identify needs

2 - identify skis that fit the need

3 - sort the skis based on research

4 - if my top choice is barely ahead of my second choice, but costs twice as much, discard that one

5 - focus on the top remaining skis

 

EXACTLY!!! Quoted for truth. The brand loyalty thing is just idiotic. Part of the research for me includes looking at build quality / durability and materials ect.....

post #15 of 26

First I look for a ski style that will handle my needs decently (as in one ski quiver that will not be great at anything but decent enough to do a lot of stuff without horrible trouble) after that I look at price. I do account for brand reputation of skis, but the top sheet moniker doesn't influence me all that much. I'm more concerned about the boot than the ski.

post #16 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by liv2 ski View Post

Understand that I am a Gear Whore and justify ?

This seasons opening quiver equals 6 pair.


And there is a problem with that??? 

post #17 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by time2clmb View Post

 

 

EXACTLY!!! Quoted for truth. The brand loyalty thing is just idiotic. Part of the research for me includes looking at build quality / durability and materials ect.....



are you serious? Ski brand tells you right off the bat something of integrity and structure quality, even personality. And if you know the history of a brand, skis they produced in the recent past, and what they are developing now, you can really narrow down your search. There is no reason to focus solely on one or two brands, but there could be a group that as a whole satisfy your search.  Certain brands have changed their location and even ski structure and quality. Good stuff to know. IMO

post #18 of 26

Perhaps I should have said, purchasing based solely on brand loyalty is idiotic.

post #19 of 26

Are they soft snow oriented?

Are they of good quality?

Are they a good buy, relatively speaking?

Are they an all mountain ski?

Are they red?

post #20 of 26

Also, there is rarely only one model ski to fit the need, so looking at only one brand is senseless.

 

Since riding a ski is a form of endorsement, I won't ride a ski from a company whose practices I disagree with.  

post #21 of 26

The most important question is how will I explain it to my wife once she sees the bank statement.

post #22 of 26

Hannibal Lecter: First principles, Clarice. Simplicity. Read Marcus Aurelius. Of each particular thing ask: what is it in itself? What is its nature? What does he do, this man you seek?
Clarice Starling: He kills women...
Hannibal Lecter: No. That is incidental. What is the first and principal thing he does? What needs does he serve by killing?
Clarice Starling: Anger, um, social acceptance, and, huh, sexual frustrations, sir...
Hannibal Lecter: No! He covets. That is his nature. And how do we begin to covet, Clarice? Do we seek out things to covet? Make an effort to answer now.
Clarice Starling: No. We just...
Hannibal Lecter: No. We begin by coveting what we see every day. Don't you feel eyes moving over your body, Clarice? And don't your eyes seek out the things you want?

post #23 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Keith Jordan View Post

1 - identify needs

2 - identify skis that fit the need

3 - sort the skis based on research

4 - if my top choice is barely ahead of my second choice, but costs twice as much, discard that one

5 - focus on the top remaining skis

 

But if I have a few skis I'm equally interested in, I might make an impulse purchase of one of the skis from that group.

 

In terms of brand ... I think every manufacturer makes good skis ... I personally have a bias against Rossignol (no rational reason, I just do ... no offense to Rossi fans), and in favor of Volkl and Fischer. But that's just one factor among many.


Aha, I see you apply KT resolve here...

I leave that at work, for time being.

Skiing is an expression of joy to me, so I let the irrational side of my inner self to take control (even if partially) when it comes to

stuff like skis and in general sporting goods.

I let myself be uided by that certain "Je ne sais quoi" that a particular ski can inspire in me. That might also comprise the brand, then the price tag will become a rational thing. If I can meet it, ok, if not, oh well too bad, I'll wait.

When I was a broke down student it was money, anything that I could afford, usually GS skis (Maxel in 195 and then VR27 in 205)

Then when I started to earn some money, since most of the other skiers in the family were on Voelkl, it was Voelkl, again GS skis, but also a K2 SL.

I kept buying Voelkl for quite a while, always GS skis, until recently, when a pair of Nordica HR caught my fancy. Alas, the price was high for my pocket so I waited for a while until the price dropped into my reach...

post #24 of 26

In 1999, I skied Rossignol Pow'Airs partly because everybody else was skiing TenEighty's.  In 2001 I skied Kneissl Supafly, because everybody else was skiing PowAir, Enemy, Concept and TenEighty.  I liked the exclusivity.  Wanted to show something different could work.  from 2003-2009, I skied K2 Public Enemy, Fujative and another Public Enemy, because they were cheap and durable, and I was poor.  In 2009 I went to Hart, and in 2010 it's another Hart and Kneissl.  I just want to ski something a little different than the rest of the pack.  I also would like to see both of those companies restored to their former glory.  Kneissl always made good skis and was always innovative (Bigfoot?  Ergo?), and somehow nobody seemed to notice.  Hart of course doesn't make their own skis in house, but at least they are in cahoots with people who do it well.  As far as I'm concerned, as long as there's skiing, there must be Kneissl and Hart!  This goes for Kastle too!

post #25 of 26

fug: I don't know man, about former glory, Hart started out as a crappy Head. they seem to make a good enough bump ski now.

post #26 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

fug: I don't know man, about former glory, Hart started out as a crappy Head. they seem to make a good enough bump ski now.



Didn't they sell something like 144,000 pairs a year somewhere in the mid 60's?  They must have been doing something right.

 

Plus all my mogul compadres loved them in the late 90's.

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