EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Off-Season Sports & The Lighter Side › Cycling › When all else fails, get a clue before going for a 40 mile ride and then call for mommy
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

When all else fails, get a clue before going for a 40 mile ride and then call for mommy

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 

The local Search and Rescue motto is "Intervening for Natural Selection":

 

Stranded bikers rescued, with hot cocoa

 

Quote:
About 16 rescue workers spent 12 hours braving the cold and adverse weather conditions Wednesday night to reach two mountain bikers who became stranded in the wilderness northwest of Durango.

A man, 30, and a woman, 24, both from Golden, called 911 for help at 7 p.m. Wednesday from the Hermosa Creek Drainage, saying they were caught in the rain and hail. They were equipped with a global-satellite positioning receiver and were able to provide rescuers with their exact location.

They had only shorts and T-shirts, and no way of starting a fire, said Butch Knowlton, director of La Plata County Search and Rescue.

Rescue members spent all night trying to reach the couple. When they finally did at 6:15 a.m., all the bicyclists needed were an extra layer of clothes and a cup of hot chocolate, Knowlton said. They then rode out on their own power.

“The calls that we received indicated they were in a very critical situation, and therefore, we responded to the call," Knowlton said. “It was difficult to understand the fact that once they got some hot chocolate and warmed up a little, they took off."

Agencies that participated included Search and Rescue, Montezuma County Search and Rescue, the La Plata County Sheriff's Office and the Colorado Mounted Rangers.

A private helicopter was used to fly in supplies, but the effort was unsuccessful, Knowlton said.

The cyclists started at the south Hermosa Creek Trailhead and rode up the trail. They ended up on the divide between Rico and Hermosa Creek and started back south. They became stranded on the south ridge of South Hope of the Hermosa Creek Drainage, northwest of Durango.

They were in town as part of a Yeti mountain bicycling event.

“It was a late start for them to do a 40-mile ride, and they were totally ill prepared," Knowlton said. “They had T-shirts and shorts, and that is it."

Rescue workers spoke to the riders several times during the night via a cell phone, and they kept indicating they were hypothermic and miserable, Knowlton said.

“We were led to believe it was a very dire situation," he said.

Rescue workers were perturbed to reach the pair and find they were in good shape. The cyclists didn't need medical attention or need to be airlifted out of the backcountry.

“It's very frustrating for (rescue workers) who went out into these conditions to provide assistance for these people," Knowlton said.

Still, rescue workers are pleased the couple are Ok, he said.

“I'm glad that they survived the night," Knowlton said. “I'm sure that it was a miserable night for them."

 

 

The initial article yesterday:

 

 

Rescuers look for lost bikers

2 people caught in rainstorm northwest of Durango

 

 

Area search and rescue crews were trying to get warm clothes to two bicyclists caught in the high country Wednesday night.

"This is a life-and-death situation," Butch Knowlton, La Plata County Director of Emergency Preparedness, said at about 10 p.m. "They're hypothermic, and we are gravely concerned."

Knowlton said the two people, who are on mountain bikes, have a GPS unit and had given their coordinates. They were at an elevation of 10,800 feet on a high ridge between the Hermosa area and the Dolores River Basin, northwest of Durango.

"All they have on are T-shirts and shorts," Knowlton said. "They were caught in heavy hail and rain between 4 and 5 p.m." He said the ridge where the cyclists were had been under a severe-storm warning by the National Weather Service at that time.

"They became disoriented and lost the trail," he said.

Search and rescue volunteers from Montezuma and Dolores counties were attempting to reach them from the Dolores River Basin, and La Plata County Search and Rescue workers were going up from the east. Continuing storm cells complete with lightning were hampering efforts.

"We're trying to get an aircraft to drop La Plata County Search and Rescue in to take them blankets and warm clothes," Knowlton said.

He didn't know the cyclists' names or where they are from.

 

 


Edited by Alpinord - 8/12/10 at 10:03am
post #2 of 26

Sounds like they were close to being charter members of the Darwin society.  I hope SAR sends them a bill.

 

Mike

post #3 of 26
Thread Starter 

At least an honorable mention. As I'm sitting here looking toward Hermosa Creek, 10 miles away, the clouds are building for yet another storm....as they have every day for the past 4 weeks!!

 

Some comments after the article:

 

"Leaving late for a back country ride in Durango, (during monsoon season even)- and they didn't pack anything? People are incredible...

Heard a snippet on the radio about this - the couple was quoted as asking how much the chopper cost, and upon hearing the cost to be lifted, they opted to ride out. They should be responsible for all costs involved in their coddling and hot chocolate delivery."

 

 

"Government Search and Rescue organizations have a hard time instituting "We'll Bill You If We Come Rescue You" because it has a tendency to cause many who are in genuine need of assistance from contacting emergency services until circumstances are very desperate (and that usually increases the complexity and cost of the rescue effort and decreases the chances of successful outcome). AND because it would tend to make most outdoor activities even more egalitarian than some sports already are - the burden of any expensive insurance simply to hike further than a city park, etc.
There is an alternative that might make sense. Arizona has the "Stupid Motorist Law" - bringing the full cost and penalty of rescues for circumstances such as driving into a signed flooded wash. This same sort of "common sense threshold" could be established for backcountry rescues.
It would certainly seem applicable in this case. The pair stranded overnight sound like they "played at drama queen" until morning light.

Does Colorado need a "Stupid Recreationist Law" ??"

 

I sure wonder about their GPS capability. Granted, it is very rugged terrain and last evenings storm was hellacious. The wind,  downpour, lightening and thunder was intense from that direction. Must have been an interesting night. I wonder if there will be a bambino named Jesus Hermosa in nine months. 

 

Remember to be prepared in the backcountry and bring your t-shirt and cell phone. Surely help is only a speed dial away if you run into a problem. 

 

 

post #4 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post

At least an honorable mention. As I'm sitting here looking toward Hermosa Creek, 10 miles away, the clouds are building for yet another storm....as they have every day for the past 4 weeks!!


Sounds like it's time to head for a ride!

post #5 of 26

And take your emergency locator beacon -- no need for any clothes, food, water, or matches.

 

post #6 of 26

I don't think not enough water was their problem.

post #7 of 26

To me this looks like the case of the swimmer who is in water just too deep for him to touch and then pannics. Its not even dark at 7pm ,but at that point they knew they were sleeping out that night. 

 

So what should people bring on a MTB ride?

 

MTB repair kit: Spare tube, patch kit, pump, multitool, spare chain link, spare deurrilure hanger, zipties, ductape

 

Emergency Kit: a lighter and knife, water purifcaition tabs, first aid kit.

 

Extra Supplies: extra water, extra food.

 

What else?

post #8 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post

To me this looks like the case of the swimmer who is in water just too deep for him to touch and then pannics. Its not even dark at 7pm ,but at that point they knew they were sleeping out that night. 

 

So what should people bring on a MTB ride?

 

MTB repair kit: Spare tube, patch kit, pump, multitool, spare chain link, spare deurrilure hanger, zipties, ductape

 

Emergency Kit: a lighter and knife, water purifcaition tabs, first aid kit.

 

Extra Supplies: extra water, extra food.

 

What else?


a light....

 

then you dont spend the night

post #9 of 26

Well...., first of all, you don't go into the mountains in Colorado without foul weather gear.  Our weather is extremely changeable, and you need to be prepared for a sudden and drastic change in temperature/humidity.  Think 50 degree swings in temperature, even in the middle of the day.

 

Second, you don't set out on a ride that you are unlikely to complete before dark.  That means that you leave some leeway for changes in the weather that might affect your ability to get back before dark.  In the mountains, you need to plan on being out of the high alpine terrain by 11 to noon.  Lightning is a real hazard.  Thunderstorms as well.

 

Third, if you are going backcountry, you need some food.  Trail mix, whatever.  And water.  Don't plan on harvesting the rain for your sustenance.

 

Fourth, if you are going more than a few miles backcountry, a knife and some matches might save your life.  Doesn't weigh much, and (again) it may be the difference between making it and not.

 

Mike

post #10 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by habacomike View Post

Well...., first of all, you don't go into the mountains in Colorado without foul weather gear.  Our weather is extremely changeable, and you need to be prepared for a sudden and drastic change in temperature/humidity.  Think 50 degree swings in temperature, even in the middle of the day.

 

Second, you don't set out on a ride that you are unlikely to complete before dark.  That means that you leave some leeway for changes in the weather that might affect your ability to get back before dark.  In the mountains, you need to plan on being out of the high alpine terrain by 11 to noon.  Lightning is a real hazard.  Thunderstorms as well.

 

Third, if you are going backcountry, you need some food.  Trail mix, whatever.  And water.  Don't plan on harvesting the rain for your sustenance.

 

Fourth, if you are going more than a few miles backcountry, a knife and some matches might save your life.  Doesn't weigh much, and (again) it may be the difference between making it and not.

 

Mike


again all this stuff is nice but an HID light with 8 hour of life will almost insure you never get stuck in the woods unless someone is hurt or very sick.

post #11 of 26

Since my readig comprehension sucks- did they day where these folks were from?  Wondering if they were tourists?

post #12 of 26
Golden
post #13 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post

To me this looks like the case of the swimmer who is in water just too deep for him to touch and then pannics. Its not even dark at 7pm ,but at that point they knew they were sleeping out that night. 

 

So what should people bring on a MTB ride?

 

MTB repair kit: Spare tube, patch kit, pump, multitool, spare chain link, spare deurrilure hanger, zipties, ductape

 

Emergency Kit: a lighter and knife, water purifcaition tabs, first aid kit.

 

Extra Supplies: extra water, extra food.

 

What else?

I always carry an emergency bivy sac.  It's reflective, waterproof, and takes up less room than a spare inner tube when rolled up.  I've been caught in blizzards in the mountains on what started off as a beautiful summer day, so I always carry my emergency bivy with me.

 

144.jpg

 

post #14 of 26

Quote:

Originally Posted by habacomike View Post

Well...., first of all, you don't go into the mountains in Colorado without foul weather gear.  Our weather is extremely changeable, and you need to be prepared for a sudden and drastic change in temperature/humidity.  Think 50 degree swings in temperature, even in the middle of the day.

 

What is foul weather gear?

 

I ride from April through december in and around Logan and for the most part, foul weather gear is a jersey, bike shorts, and gloves. If I know it will be below freezing I will add a LS capilene. Sometimes bring along a pack-able goretex shell, but it rarely comes out unless its well below freezing or I am riding in a thunderstorm and then only on the DH.

 

I eat and drink and even rest in the saddle. The only time I would need layers is if I have a major injury or mechanical durring bad weather. And if that happened, extra layers would only make me more comfy while walking out /  waiting for someone to drag my ass out. I like the emergency bivy idea.

 

But then again, I don't ride in Colorado.

 

post #15 of 26

Sure, there is a bit of context in all of this.  I have been known not to take my rain gear when I go for a short (<2 hour) ride.  However, if I'm headed to the high country on a long ride, I always have a rain jacket with me.  Hypothermia is nothing to be toyed with, and our temps can drop 40+ degrees in a T-storm.

 

Mike

post #16 of 26
Thread Starter 

At dark thirty, when you are hours away from assistance or where you expected to be and at the moment everything goes wrong what would you want to have with you?.....and what are you willing to schlep on all the other rides when nothing goes wrong? According to SAR, you should probably bring much more than most of us tends to (including 1st aid kit and fire potential), but a shell and thermal option is 'going into the mountains 101' gear.....especially during the monsoon season.

 

The flashlight idea is sound, but it's no good if you can't figure out how to use your GPS and can't find the trail.

 

The super lightweight bivy sacks/blankets are great for a variety of uses. I leave a couple in the cars and you can toss one in a pack at the last minute if you see the potential need.

 

An updated report:

 

Sounds like Butch was miffed and I'll bet a bill is on the way.

 

Quote:

Rescue crews find stranded bikers

Man and woman able to ride out of woods on own


Herald Staff Writer
Article Last Updated; Friday, August 13, 2010  12:00AM
About 16 rescue workers spent 12 hours braving the cold and adverse weather conditions to reach two mountain bikers who became stranded in the wilderness northwest of Durango.

Nick Truitt, 31, and Sarah Rawley, 24, both believed to be from Golden, called 911 for help at 7 p.m. Wednesday from the Hermosa Creek Drainage, saying they were caught in the rain and hail, said Butch Knowlton, director of La Plata County Search and Rescue.

They were equipped with a global-satellite positioning receiver and were able to provide rescuers with their exact location, he said.

They had on only shorts and T-shirts, and no way of starting a fire,

Rescue members spent all night trying to reach the couple. When they finally did at 6:15 a.m. Thursday, all the bicyclists needed was an extra layer of clothes and a cup of hot chocolate, Knowlton said. They then rode out on their own power.

"The calls that we received indicated they were in a very critical situation, and therefore, we responded to the call," Knowlton said. "It was difficult to understand the fact that once they got some hot chocolate and warmed up a little, they took off."

Agencies that participated included La Plata County Search and Rescue, Montezuma County Search and Rescue, the La Plata County Sheriff's Office and the Colorado Mounted Rangers.

A private helicopter was used to fly in supplies, but the effort was unsuccessful, Knowlton said.

The cyclists started at the south Hermosa Creek Trailhead and rode up the trail. They ended up on the divide between Rico and Hermosa Creek and started back south. They became stranded on the south ridge of South Hope of the Hermosa Creek Drainage, northwest of Durango.

They were in town as part of a Yeti mountain bicycling event. The Yeti offices on the Front Range were closed for the event. Twitter feeds made no mention of the incident Thursday.

"It was a late start for them to do a 40-mile ride, and they were totally ill-prepared," Knowlton said. "They had T-shirts and shorts, and that is it."

Rescue workers spoke to the riders several times during the night via a cell phone, and they kept indicating they were hypothermic and miserable, Knowlton said.

"We were led to believe it was a very dire situation," he said.

Rescue workers were perturbed to reach the pair and find they were in good shape. The cyclists didn't need medical attention or need to be airlifted out of the backcountry.

"It's very frustrating for (rescue workers) who went out into these conditions to provide assistance for these people," Knowlton said.

Still, rescue workers are pleased the two cyclists are OK, he said.

"I'm glad that they survived the night," Knowlton said. "I'm sure that it was a miserable night for them."

Efforts to reach Truitt and Rawley through Yeti bicycles were unsuccessful Thursday.

It is routine for the county to bill people for the cost of search and rescue missions if they don't have a hiker's certificate, which cost $3 per year or $12 for five years, said Dan Bender, spokesman for the La Plata County Sheriff's Office. Hunting and fishing licenses also cover search and rescue missions, he said.

The cyclists told authorities they didn't have any licenses.

Knowlton was unsure of the total cost of the rescue, but he said a helicopter was used.

post #17 of 26

In the front range a lot of people will push it with storms more, in part because it's much easier to get back safely, and in part because it allows people to do things after work.  Of course, some people then get hit by lightning, and you also end up with things like the 11/01 flatiron rescue of a well-known climber who given his experience  wasn't really pushing it but did get caught in a storm and ended up looking very ill-prepared.  All that said. for them to be from Golden and go out late with nothing as they did, with clouds building, and their not being teenagers, is pretty amazing.  No offense to any actual teenagers out there who may read this.

 

If SAR teams only rescued people who were well-prepared and prudent in their actions, there wouldn't be much need for SAR.  I'm sympathetic to some sort of rescue insurance requirement in some instances.  Definitely nothing wrong with a little public embarrassment, either. 

post #18 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post

At dark thirty, when you are hours away from assistance or where you expected to be and at the moment everything goes wrong what would you want to have with you?.....and what are you willing to schlep on all the other rides when nothing goes wrong? According to SAR, you should probably bring much more than most of us tends to (including 1st aid kit and fire potential), but a shell and thermal option is 'going into the mountains 101' gear.....especially during the monsoon season.

 

The flashlight idea is sound, but it's no good if you can't figure out how to use your GPS and can't find the trail.

 

The super lightweight bivy sacks/blankets are great for a variety of uses. I leave a couple in the cars and you can toss one in a pack at the last minute if you see the potential need.

 

An updated report:

 

Sounds like Butch was miffed and I'll bet a bill is on the way.

 


I aint talking flashlight I am talking HID trail light. this has saved my ass a couple time in utah. 8+ hours of battery life with more than enough light to see the trail.  I tend to carry with me if the ride starts late or if its pretty long. 

 

 

4408_84497948356_505253356_1717152_3617034_n.jpg

 

 

post #19 of 26
Thread Starter 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post


I aint talking flashlight I am talking HID trail light. this has saved my ass a couple time in utah. 8+ hours of battery life with more than enough light to see the trail.  I tend to carry with me if the ride starts late or if its pretty long. 


I gotcha, the HID is what I meant. Even if it gets dark, you can still move towards your destination. I was facetiously commenting on the fact that what I got from the articles is they had a GPS but lost the trail and could not find it.

post #20 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by CTKook View Post

In the front range a lot of people will push it with storms more, in part because it's much easier to get back safely, and in part because it allows people to do things after work.  Of course, some people then get hit by lightning, and you also end up with things like the 11/01 flatiron rescue of a well-known climber who given his experience  wasn't really pushing it but did get caught in a storm and ended up looking very ill-prepared.  All that said. for them to be from Golden and go out late with nothing as they did, with clouds building, and their not being teenagers, is pretty amazing.  No offense to any actual teenagers out there who may read this.

 

If SAR teams only rescued people who were well-prepared and prudent in their actions, there wouldn't be much need for SAR.  I'm sympathetic to some sort of rescue insurance requirement in some instances.  Definitely nothing wrong with a little public embarrassment, either. 




Well said
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post


I gotcha, the HID is what I meant. Even if it gets dark, you can still move towards your destination. I was facetiously commenting on the fact that what I got from the articles is they had a GPS but lost the trail and could not find it.

 

From the stand point of MTB the GPS was made obsolete by the invention of the trail. Using a GPS to follow most trails is simply a waste of time. Its nice to have a gadget that tells you things like how many miles traveled, how many feet climbed, etc...

 

A GPS is only needed if you are bushwacking or traveling over open terrain, rock, etc...   

post #21 of 26

If they were prepared,  with proper clothing or even just matches, they would have been fine.

But they weren't, they called, they should pay!

 

Colorado has had cheap SAR insurance for as long as I can remember.

http://www.huts.org/whats_new/corsar.html

post #22 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by SHREDHEAD View Post

If they were prepared,  with proper clothing or even just matches, they would have been fine.


Well, actually, they were fine. They just called SAR anyway.

post #23 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post
A GPS is only needed if you are bushwacking or traveling over open terrain, rock, etc...   


.....to find the trail.

 

With a known coordinate and a map (on GPS or physical), you could at least know what direction to move to intersect a lost trail. Then there are track logs and backtracking, ie bread crumbs.

 

As long as you are bringing a GPS, learning to use your GPS and route planning before going on a 40 mile ride is probably worth doing, eh?

post #24 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post




.....to find the trail.

 

With a known coordinate and a map (on GPS or physical), you could at least know what direction to move to intersect a lost trail. Then there are track logs and backtracking, ie bread crumbs.

 

As long as you are bringing a GPS, learning to use your GPS and route planning before going on a 40 mile ride is probably worth doing, eh?

 

If you use a GPS you might as well learn to use it correctly. I agree on that.

 

But I still don't think that GPS has a huge role in most trail riding. The easiest way to find a trial is to never leave it. People never lose a trail, they choose to leave a trail. If you want to do that then having a GPS and knowing how to mark a point / track back is important.

 

Some times a trail will just end (or become faint / indistinct or braided) due to Live stock trampling, multiple reroutes, downed trees, burned area, washed out, avy, land slide, etc... I were riding somewhere for the first time and the trial just ended, or turned into a braided mess that I couldn't figure out in half an hour, I would turn around. Let someone who knows the trail pioneer a route across the carnage.

post #25 of 26
If you are going tp leave the trail, then you ought to have a map and compass (and know how to use them). Amazing how them newfangled gps dingy a mobs don't work when the batteries go dead. Same with the hid lights. While either might save your ass, there's nothing like being able to survive because you have low tech backup and know how to use it.

As the boy scouts say "be prepared."
post #26 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by habacomike View Post

If you are going tp leave the trail, then you ought to have a map and compass (and know how to use them). Amazing how them newfangled gps dingy a mobs don't work when the batteries go dead. Same with the hid lights. While either might save your ass, there's nothing like being able to survive because you have low tech backup and know how to use it.

As the boy scouts say "be prepared."


the battery life on mine is VERY long. 32 hours on LED, 18 on the lowest HID setting, 8 on the highest HID. there are LED sold today that have multiday battery life at the same brightness of my light. If I was someone how stuck and lost battery life I must have been out for 2 days or longer even I am not that stupid. just sayin we MTBer pride ourselves in our over powered lights.

I was literally so wired tonight I did a 70 mile road ride totally at night, still not tired and its 3am :(. 

 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Cycling
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Off-Season Sports & The Lighter Side › Cycling › When all else fails, get a clue before going for a 40 mile ride and then call for mommy