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Removing summer wax

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

My skis have a heavy coat of summer wax. When I remove this, do I melt the wax first and then scrape, or do I just scrape off the dry wax?

 

thanks

post #2 of 13

Just scrape with a plastic scraper and ski.......

 

Some will come on here and say to just ski it off, others will say you should scrape and re-wax 15 times..... 

 

Really on early season snow with soft summer storage wax it doesn't really matter, just get out on the snow and get your legs working again!

 

post #3 of 13

While it's there you might as well melt it and do a hot scrape. Just my opinion.

post #4 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by ecimmortal View Post

While it's there you might as well melt it and do a hot scrape. Just my opinion.


Seeing as it's summer 'n all:

 

If the wax is on your ski all summer, the outside part is probably getting dusty.....

 

If you scrape you remove the wax and all the dust....

 

If you melt don't you risk that dust ending up in the pores of the ski, requiring another hot scrape with fresh wax to clean??

 

Discuss.......

post #5 of 13

Melt it, scrape it.  The bases should now be fairly clean.  Now cycle temp (melt in, cool, melt in cool...) in 4 or 5 cycles of the wax you want to start the year with.  You can do as many cycles as you want but unless you have money on the run, 4 or 5 will have 4 or 5 more cycles than most folks on the mountain.  From here on out you should only need to maintain them.

 

If you do a base grind or go too long without touching up, repeat the above cycle.  Same if you do a hot wax cleaning.

 

The intent of the cycling is to reach saturation.  Accomplish close to the same as a hot box without subjecting your skis to as much heat and it only costs as much as an iron.

post #6 of 13

If your skis are normally maintained, then scrap storage/transportation wax off, then wax with right wax for that day, and you are done. If you melt it, you put at least part of dirt which collected on wax into base, and that's something you don't want to do it... afterall, I guess that was reason to put storage wax on in first place, right? ;)

Repeated wax cycles are needed if you stone grinded skis before you put them away, if you didn't then there's no need.

post #7 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post

Melt it, scrape it. 


I don't believe I said that.     I'm blaming it on the summer heat.  I can't even think of what I might have been thinking since I always scrape without remelting unless I'm mixing waxes.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by primoz View Post

If you melt it, you put at least part of dirt which collected on wax into base, and that's something you don't want to do it... afterall, I guess that was reason to put storage wax on in first place, right? ;)


primoz is correct.  Thanks for correcting this.
 

post #8 of 13

If you melt the travel wax, then some of the dust & dirt that might have settled on top of the wax will mix in with the molten wax. 

 

If you scrape the wax while it is still warm & soft, the wax and suspended dirt will all come off, without pushing dirt into the base.  That's a key reason for doing a hot or warm scrape, also referred to as a cleaning pass.

post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by mogulmuncher View Post

If you melt the travel wax, then some of the dust & dirt that might have settled on top of the wax will mix in with the molten wax. 

 

If you scrape the wax while it is still warm & soft, the wax and suspended dirt will all come off, without pushing dirt into the base.  That's a key reason for doing a hot or warm scrape, also referred to as a cleaning pass.


That was my reasoning as well. The notion that all the dust will settle into the base ehile you're basically doing a hotscrape is kind of ludicrous to me.
 

post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by budgiesmuggler View Post

My skis have a heavy coat of summer wax. When I remove this, do I melt the wax first and then scrape, or do I just scrape off the dry wax?

 

thanks


Personally....and I am NOT a "professional ski waxer" by any stretch of the imagination....but for my skis I scrape the dry wax first.  Then I wax as I normally would.  I DO agree with the fact that if you have "dirty" wax on the bases you should not hot wax first (open pores + dirt = bad for skis). 

post #11 of 13

Those of us who ski in the east on a lot of manufactured snow, with thin cover in high-traffic areas, are unfortunately somewhat used to our skis picking up dirt over the course of the day.

 

At the end of the day we like to clean our skis up, whether it's just to be nice to them or as preparation for training or competition the next day.  A very effective way to clean them is the hot scrape (or warm scrape, or cleaning pass) wax and removal routine.  Two or three passes is really great, if there is enough time, energy and interest.  With each re-waxing, a bit more dirt gets lifted up and suspended in the molten wax.  When the wax comes off, the dirt comes with it.  You can get a bit of an idea of how dirty the skis were by looking at the colour of the wax scrapings.  As the skis get cleaner, the wax scrapings stay the same colour as the wax you started with.

 

The dust that might have accumulated on a travel wax won't be embedded into bases by re-melting in any way close to how dirt is mashed in by skiing all day, so there's really no risk of base pores being clogged by surface dust if you re-melt the travel wax.   Now I am assuming that the iron is just being run over the ski with its own weight to melt the wax, not being pressed down as if ironing a shirt.

 

Of course you can just scrape the cold wax off if you like.  My preference for re-melting and scraping warm and soft wax is because I don't have to scrape the bases so hard to get the wax off.  Less effort for me, and just a little bit easier on the bases.  Also a bit easier to clean up the scraped wax.

post #12 of 13

post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by primoz View Post

If your skis are normally maintained, then scrap storage/transportation wax off, then wax with right wax for that day, and you are done. If you melt it, you put at least part of dirt which collected on wax into base, and that's something you don't want to do it... afterall, I guess that was reason to put storage wax on in first place, right? ;)

Repeated wax cycles are needed if you stone grinded skis before you put them away, if you didn't then there's no need.

Best answer above

 

That said, if you just scrape it and ski on it before fighting for space on the Thanksgiving Weekend white ribbon of death you aren't likely to lose much performance wise.  But, if you have time and want to go "all out" then scrape it and wax for whatever the weather and snow conditions are predicted to be the morning you actualy go. 

Welcome to EpicSki Budgiesmuggler

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