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Do Skis Go Bad?

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 

I have two sets of old skis.  One pair is Elan GSX 176 21M 2002 model that I bought brand new last year, never had binding mounted.  When purchased, though seven years old at the time, the had a full warranty.  Skied them off and on last year but I didn't well in NASTAR with them because I lacked the experience to have that much of a turn radius on a race course Was only second season).  The skis worked great and ski nice but they were too much of a step up for me from my Atomic LT11 170 16M skis.  I always did better on the LT's.

 

I was also given at the end of this season, a pair of Head Titanium Full Metal Jacket Cyber World Cup180 19M.  My friend believes they are and '01 or '02.  He skied them one season off and on but didn't like them.  Thought about playing around with them this year but to get them ready to ski, they would need a base grind and new, or at least another, set of bindings.  My thoughts on them are that as far as a ski goes, they still have a season or two of use.  My plan for using them are that once I get snapped in to skiing again this year, I should be able to step up a meter or two in the turn radius and these skis seem to split the difference between my LT11's and Elan GSX.

 

The skis still seem to have some life in them though I wouldn't trust the bindings (Look TT9).  There is a race plate on them too.  I figure I could find a decent set of bindings for them but I'm curious if this particular ski just isn't worth it.

 

I'm just trying to get some thoughts on whether the Head skis are worth the effort or not.

 

Thanks,

Ken

post #2 of 21

How they're stored will be a factor. Temperature-controlled storage without wild humidity fluctuations ... I'd think they would still be fine.

post #3 of 21

I was riding my old K2 Fujatives at Mt. Hood last week, and while climbing up the hill to board the Palmer, I realized the right one was bent backwards (UnIntentional Tail Rocker).  I can only assume this happened while being stored in the corner of the garage because I've never crashed on them before.

post #4 of 21

Picking up a pair of skis default like that  and having them work well with your skiing is a long shot, IMO.

post #5 of 21

They were good skis till they hung out with too many Bandits.

post #6 of 21
Thread Starter 



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by RISkier View Post

They were good skis till they hung out with too many Bandits.



  It's still early and I'm having my first cup of coffee.  Thanks for starting my day off with a chuckle.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Keith Jordan View Post

How they're stored will be a factor. Temperature-controlled storage without wild humidity fluctuations ... I'd think they would still be fine.


In his basement.  It's not finished so in NH that means a bit on the humid side but garages see more of a fluctuation.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by FujativeOCR View Post

I was riding my old K2 Fujatives at Mt. Hood last week, and while climbing up the hill to board the Palmer, I realized the right one was bent backwards (UnIntentional Tail Rocker).  I can only assume this happened while being stored in the corner of the garage because I've never crashed on them before.


I've looked these over and there aren't any such issues.  Base grind and bindings"seem" to be all they need.

 

My friend is an expert skier (not his words but everyone that see him ski) and is hard on his race skis.  He never took a liking to these so he never skied them much and they've been in his basement since; 9 years(ish).  He probably skied them no more than 10-12 times.

 

My friend and I ski differently and he has 50 years experience against my 5 so our likes and dislikes in skis are different.
 

post #7 of 21
Thread Starter 

Quote:

Originally Posted by davluri View Post

Picking up a pair of skis default like that  and having them work well with your skiing is a long shot, IMO.

 

I don't disagree there are better ways to do this but these seem like they were halfway decent skis with a bit of life left in them.  My friend knows my skiing abilities better than I do and what I'm trying to achieve.  I'm not out for a ski that is perfect for me now but what I will eventually need to be skiing to get on page 1 in the beer league (this year I'm hoping to get on and stay on page 2!).  The page 1 guys all seem to be on 21M and better skis.My friend is close to my size, I'm slightly taller and our weights are withing 5 lbs of each other.  He skis Fischer WC 27M ski and is a platinum skier...always. 

 

I'm a few years from being able to do that but I think this will help my journey     .

 

post #8 of 21

If your friend really is your friend, he probably knows our needs and abilities better than we do.  I would gamble on his advice, so long as the skis aren't noticeable damaged (camber and same camber in both skis, not twisted delaminated, edge left, passes the hand twist and flex test)

 

I don't race, but racing is all about control at speed being tested by hard turns, and I speed in control a lot.  Get those skis, and ski them.  Ski them on course, but free ski them a lot more.  Get used to really working those 21 m skis in hard fast turns.  Find out what you can make them do and practice until they are a part of you.  Skiing only in a competition situation being forced to ski around gates is good, but you need more to learn.  When freeskiing,  there is no stress to interfere with the learning process.  You have to learn how to put those 21 m skis on edge and carve an 8-m turn.  You need to learn how the ski behaves when it's pushed passed its limits.  Flex characteristics are just as important as radius.  How much bend will the ski have and how quickly will it lose this bend when things start to slip?  Where are the kinks in its shape?  How does it behave when you shift your weight around?  That's what you need to know.

post #9 of 21

Maybe Alpinord can open a Rehab clinic for good skis that go bad

post #10 of 21
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

Maybe Alpinord can open a Rehab clinic for good skis that go bad



Start a 12 Step Program

 

"Hello.  My name is..."

post #11 of 21

The Elan 666 never had a chance.

 

I blame it all on bad parenting. 

post #12 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post

The Elan 666 never had a chance.


Mine have found vindication as rock skis.  A new, if hardscrabble, life.

post #13 of 21

 

How heavy are you and how heavy was your friend?

 

(I suspect that the Head WCs were actually meant for someone  in the 140-155lb range, maybe that is why he didn't like them?)

 

Take the race plate off,  have the TT9s release checked, ski them on a light setting as a pseudo-bumper.  <- what my plan of action would be.

post #14 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post

 

How heavy are you and how heavy was your friend?

 

(I suspect that the Head WCs were actually meant for someone  in the 140-155lb range, maybe that is why he didn't like them?)

 

Take the race plate off,  have the TT9s release checked, ski them on a light setting as a pseudo-bumper.  <- what my plan of action would be.


I'm 5'7" he's that or a little shorter.  I'm 175# and he's 180#.  Typically during ski season I get down to 165#

 

These are 180cm 21M ski.  Stiff as a board.  Why do you think they're for someone in the 140-155 range?  I would think that I would be at the low end of the weight for these skis and not over it

 

At a minimum with regards to the bindings, I would have to get them moved.  He used to be in boots too big too.  Come to think of it, that might be the real reason he didn't like them.  The bindings look beat up pretty bad.  He skis with his feet very close together and his bindings show it.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

If your friend really is your friend, he probably knows our needs and abilities better than we do.  I would gamble on his advice, so long as the skis aren't noticeable damaged (camber and same camber in both skis, not twisted delaminated, edge left, passes the hand twist and flex test)

 

I don't race, but racing is all about control at speed being tested by hard turns, and I speed in control a lot.  Get those skis, and ski them.  Ski them on course, but free ski them a lot more.  Get used to really working those 21 m skis in hard fast turns.  Find out what you can make them do and practice until they are a part of you.  Skiing only in a competition situation being forced to ski around gates is good, but you need more to learn.  When freeskiing,  there is no stress to interfere with the learning process.  You have to learn how to put those 21 m skis on edge and carve an 8-m turn.  You need to learn how the ski behaves when it's pushed passed its limits.  Flex characteristics are just as important as radius.  How much bend will the ski have and how quickly will it lose this bend when things start to slip?  Where are the kinks in its shape?  How does it behave when you shift your weight around?  That's what you need to know.


The skis look solid.  Stiff and torsionally stiff.  Edges good and no delam. What you laid out is the same way I had it in my head.

 

Thanks,

Ken
 

post #15 of 21

Old Volkl Snow Rangers vintage '95 have mellowed a bit, but you can still ride them to death, just watch out, the old boyz can still catch an edge.

They seem to love my SoFLA garage, hope all my rockered K2s can take the heat as well.

post #16 of 21


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post
These are 180cm 21M ski.  Stiff as a board.  Why do you think they're for someone in the 140-155 range?


Because it's an '01 design and 180 lb guys were skiing  ~190cm GS boards then.

 

Granted, Head was not one of the brands that skied 'long'.

post #17 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post

Because it's an '01 design and 180 lb guys were skiing  ~190cm GS boards then.

 

Granted, Head was not one of the brands that skied 'long'.



Fair enough.  But I would throw out that this person, even then, knew how to buy skis and he bought them for racing. He was probably a few pounds lighter (46 y/o Vs. 56 y/o).  He likes long skis.  He refers to his 183 Fisher Race skis as his short skis; he races on Fischer 188's.

 

I think I'm going to trudge along at this slow and if things fall into place to get them out on the snow I'll do it.

post #18 of 21

Yeah, my Head Mojos lose their camber when you hot wax them (heavy rubber sheet?), never saw that in any of my old race skis, not even one pair.

post #19 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by snokat View Post

Yeah, my Head Mojos lose their camber when you hot wax them (heavy rubber sheet?), never saw that in any of my old race skis, not even one pair.



Any ski with dampening, Mantra, Explosiv, Legend Pro, Sixth Sense, which is all of mine, do that. It goes back to normal as it cools, right? scared me when it first happened, though. (many race skis, engineered more for dramatic pop and rebound, may have less dampening. )

post #20 of 21

All my Fischer RC4 race stock skis go reverse camber when hot waxed. It is just like a bimetallic switch in a thermostat. When cool they are back to normal camber.

post #21 of 21

When my quiver was nothing but Volkls, they were built with the camber in, not molded in, they never 'quivered' from the heat. he-he

I may be showing my age on this one, today's materials are lighter so they are less dense as well, which prolly lends to the floppy feel when they are hot waxed.

 

PS Haven't had a new Volkl since '95. I've only had one pair of capped skis, Xscreams, and i don't recall noticing that they 'lost it' either.

     Now my rockered K2s are very light, so they won't surprise me if they 'droop' too.

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