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What skis after a serious medical setback?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

I had an aorta dissection in March and spent 2 weeks in a coma, 4+ weeks in the hospital. My body was completely broken down and is not yet back to any semblance of strength I once possessed.

 

I skied a little Memorial Day to see my friends, but my gear was for someone else: me before the attack.

 

I am concerned that at 62 years old, with Testosterone levels not at their once highest level, I will have some difficulty regaining muscle mass, that I won't have much strength till midway into the 10-11 season. Pushing around those Legend Pro's with less power than last year will be tough. My thought was to ski the Legend Pro in a 165 instead of my 176 for a while, or get the Mythic in a 165.

 

Any thoughts? Thanks.

post #2 of 10

Wow! Vibes.  

 

Have you investigated PT options?

post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the thoughts. PT=physical therapy? No, I ride every day for 1-2 hours and climb a 90 foot tree in my yard for upper body, but no structured therapy. My stomach is still sore from all the muscles having been cut through of course, so my core work outs are limited, though started. I do wonder about testoserone's role in rebuilding, not as a supplement, but what we naturally  have.

 

You're thinking with a little good work, I can jump back on those Legend Pros, eh? That's probably what will happen, but I have no idea how fast I can get some strength to come back. I was pretty much ground down to zero, and when you think about it, that is like nothing that ever happened in my life before this.

post #4 of 10

I really don't know what you are goin through. But maybe physical therapist would be able to help you put together a good plan to meet your goals.

post #5 of 10

I would consider possibly modifying my skiing technique so that I wasn't "pushing" those skis around. I'm being a little bit facetious here but this may be an opportunity to refine your technique to be more efficient as your physical conditioning returns. Your previous level of conditioning may have been masking an inefficient technique and movement pattern. Good skiing technique is often more efficient and can require less effort, unless of course you choose to dial it up. Replacing muscle with smoothness and finesse will make you a much better skier as your strength returns and you are able to ski more powerfully and dynamically.

 

Going to shorter skis is probably not a bad idea either since a shorter performance ski nowadays can deliver without requiring as much power input. Here in the East, where hard snow is often the norm, I ski much of the time on a pair of 165 cm race stock slalom skis. These things deliver very good performance on hardpack even with a relatively passive technique and can be dialed up as you wish. Race stock skis have the beef to compensate for the shorter length and will hold a line without washing out.

post #6 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by oisin View Post

I would consider possibly modifying my skiing technique so that I wasn't "pushing" those skis around. I'm being a little bit facetious here but this may be an opportunity to refine your technique to be more efficient as your physical conditioning returns. Your previous level of conditioning may have been masking an inefficient technique and movement pattern. Good skiing technique is often more efficient and can require less effort, unless of course you choose to dial it up. Replacing muscle with smoothness and finesse will make you a much better skier as your strength returns and you are able to ski more powerfully and dynamically.

 

Going to shorter skis is probably not a bad idea either since a shorter performance ski nowadays can deliver without requiring as much power input. Here in the East, where hard snow is often the norm, I ski much of the time on a pair of 165 cm race stock slalom skis. These things deliver very good performance on hardpack even with a relatively passive technique and can be dialed up as you wish. Race stock skis have the beef to compensate for the shorter length and will hold a line without washing out.


Thanks, man, you have me LingMAO, mainly because I am a technical skier, read ex-racer, years of coaching, and of course agree totally with what you say, it's just, I'm already there and still have this question.  I have bought skis larger and stiffer as I enter my 7th season at Squaw skiing every day, gaining quite a bit of strength. Now I do indeed have to rely on something other than power to turn these sticks. I even thought: now I will see how women ski so well without the power that men possess.

 

A 165 Legend Pro would be awesome, but not cheap for a ski I hope to grow out of in a couple months (though I could always use it when tired, have a cold, skied too many hard runs, skiing with slower friends, when I'm 75.....


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post

I really don't know what you are goin through. But maybe physical therapist would be able to help you put together a good plan to meet your goals.



I friend from my bygone bicycle racing days said a similar thing: first: you're recovery has just begun , and two: you know how to train sounds tough. thanks for your ideas.

post #7 of 10

I wouldn't change the equipment, but I would change my skiing style by flexing my legs less and using less angulation going for a slightly more risky inclined position, but with good skeletal support for all loads, so as to put less stress on my muscles.

 

While it is true that sticking with a long radius big mountain ski might lead you down the proverbial garden path and have you skiing faster than you should, the turnier ski could just as easily sucker you into wrenching something pulling off a too-tight turn for the speed your going.  Stick with the equipment you know, and keep your legs straighter.  You'll be fine.  Try not to forget to take it easy and set back the healing process by a month or two when you have to push it to get through what you started (I hate it when that happens).

post #8 of 10
Thread Starter 

A buddy of mine who is a coach made the observation that I ski a crouch too much, kind of a GS position from back in the day I flatter myself.

 

kind of like what he (ghost) said; funny convergence of thoughts.

 

But I will definitely be responding to his follow up point this November: when you want to conserve energy, relax and enjoy yourself, try up-unweighting again. It's so funny, like pulling out an old dance step, but he's right, and so are you guys.

 

yeah, I'd be unlikley to pick up a slalom ski, and I have the Stockli's, a shorter ski with a longer radius might be sweet. 

post #9 of 10

People on this website will go to great lengths to justify buying new skis, but you take the prize!

Seriously, wish you a full recovery and many more ski days regardless of what gear you choose to ride.  To have returned to the hill as quickly as you did is pretty amazing, but remember the only timetable you're on is the one that makes you happy.

post #10 of 10
Thread Starter 

yeah, for this ski discount you must have come back from death

 

setbacks and comebacks, a skiers life one way or another, fought with your boots on.

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