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No Lobsters for Baz

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 

 

 

It’s been pretty slow here on the TR forums, so I figured I’d post up this decidedly un-skiing oriented slice of a day in the life of your humble narrator.

 

As fortune has it, today is the first day of the 48 hour Florida Lobster Mini Season. These two days are put aside prior to the opening of the commercial lobster season, and countless hordes of divers take the opportunity to head out to sea and try and harvest some of the delectable crustaceans. Many of these souls have not dived for the past year, and there seems to be an inordinate number of foolhardy, drunk, and singularly incompetent people manning the helms of literally hundreds of power boats in my area. There is usually a rather shocking body count at the end of each Mini Season, so I take these two days as a respite from the ocean, and stay safely ashore. I’ve thusly found the time today to type up a brief TR of my day at sea yesterday.

 

My commute.

 

Kulick-10-07-28-023.jpg

 

 

Around the office; my desk

 

Kulick-10-07-28-025.jpg

 

Waiting room

 

Kulick-10-07-28-027.jpg

 

Lounge and mini fridge

 

Kulick-10-07-28-028.jpg

 

A soon to be dead Caribbean Spiny Lobster, Panulirus argus

 

Kulick-10-05-24-047.jpg

 

First dive of the day was on a retired oil rig. Each of these three images was taken looking almost straight up towards the surface from a fairly great depth.

 

Kulick-10-07-27-086.jpg

 

 

Kulick-10-07-27-042.jpg

 

 

Kulick-10-07-27-034.jpg

Second dive was on a local reef where I encountered this Zebra Lionfish, Pterois volitans. These beautiful, venomous fish are in an invasive species, native to the Indian, and tropical Pacific oceans. They are voracious predators and have no natural enemies in the Atlantic, so their numbers are increasing at an alarming rate.

 

Kulick-10-07-27-142.jpg

 

Third dive of the day has me at a local favorite locale of mine, a reef where a crane being towed on a barge fell overboard many years ago. The Crane Wreck is at a moderate depth, and only a couple of miles away from my home inlet, so I visit rather frequently.

Having made a pair of dives already, I really could not stay down on the Crane for very long. As soon as I reached the bottom, I found this very large Loggerhead Turtle, Caretta caretta, resting with his head wedged under the crane. Yes, it is a male.

 

Kulick-10-07-27-176.jpg

 

It’s tough enough being a turtle, so I know that it would be all sorts of un-cool of me to disturb him while he’s getting some much-needed rest. Only problem is that I’ve got just a brief bit of time that I can safely wait at this depth, but I avoid the temptation to rouse him. Rather than set off around the wreck and surrounding reef, I decide to wait around near the Loggerhead and hope that a) he awakes before I have to ascend, and b) that he won’t be too spooked by my presence and take off in the wrong direction, i.e. away from me. I’ve got enough images of tails and posteriors.

 

While waiting, I’m visited by a passing school of Atlantic Spadefish, Chaetodipterus faber.

 

Kulick-10-07-27-167.jpg

 

A bit more of a wait brings my way a pair of Gray Angelfish, Pomacanthus arcuatus.

 

Kulick-10-07-27-171.jpg

 

At last, fortune smiles on this old dog. My bottom time is just about to expire when the Loggerhead awakes, and, joy of joy, heads directly towards my camera! Nice way to end the day.

 

Kulick-10-07-27-189.jpg

 

 

Kulick-10-07-27-190.jpg

 

Kulick-10-07-27-191.jpg

 

Kulick-10-07-27-192.jpg

 

BTW, with the exception of the Lobster image, all of these marine life images were made with a fisheye lens that offers a 180 degree field of view. The subjects are even closer to the lens than they appear to be. The lionfish and final image of the turtle were made at from a distance of approximately 3 inches.

post #2 of 22

Great pictures!

post #3 of 22

Wow!

 

Thanks for putting these up, Baz.  They're beautiful.

 

I'm headed for Alaska the day after tomorrow, but any fish pictures I post will be above the surface, not below.

post #4 of 22

"Wow" is right.

 

How big is that turtle?

post #5 of 22

Bazzer, fantastic images.  What a beautiful world lurks beneath the surface, one so few of us get the opportunity to see first hand. 

 

What camera are you using to get those shots?  Are they still shots,,, or are they frame captures from a video clip?  I just picked up an inexpensive waterproof Fuji for a trip to Floida I have coming up, but I doubt it would hold up at those depths. 

post #6 of 22

Outstanding! 

 

Thanks for these spectacular images of your life.  Made my day =)

post #7 of 22

NIce to see you are still busy at the office Baz!  And thanks again for sharing.  You have a standing exemption in the trip reports forum to post undersea stuff anytime you are so inspired.

post #8 of 22
Thread Starter 

Glad that y'all are enjoying my little TR.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post

"Wow" is right.

 

How big is that turtle?

I'd estimate that he's just shy of 5 feet long, and weighing in at near 200 lbs.


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick View Post

Bazzer, fantastic images.  What a beautiful world lurks beneath the surface, one so few of us get the opportunity to see first hand. 

 

What camera are you using to get those shots?  Are they still shots,,, or are they frame captures from a video clip?  I just picked up an inexpensive waterproof Fuji for a trip to Floida I have coming up, but I doubt it would hold up at those depths. 

All my current underwater photographs are made with Nikon D2X cameras. No longer the state of the art, they are sturdy, professional grade tools so I'm in no particular hurry to drop $8,000.00 on a newer model. (Oh yeah, got to add in another 5 or so thousand for a new underwater housing.) The lobster photograph was made with a 105mm Micro Nikkor lens, and a pair of Inon 240 strobes. All of the other marine images were made with a Tokina 10-17mm Fisheye Zoom lens and three strobes. With one exception, these shots were made with the lens zoomed out to 10mm, granting a field of view of 180 degrees. I set the lens at 17mm for the lionfish image, which offers a still-wide 79 degree view. The topside photos were made with a Canon point and shoot that I "borrowed" from my wife.

 

Not made from video stills, the D2X can shoot a 5 image burst without having to wait to load the memory card. I'm most limited by the time that it takes for the capacitors in the flash units to re-charge.

 

Read the instruction manual for your Fuji camera. The main bit of advice that I can offer for U/W photography is to get close to your subject, then get closer, and fire away.

 

Have a great time in Florida. Drop me a PM if you'll be around Miami. Perhaps I can drag you out into the Atlantic, or have you over with the Baz family for a feeding.
 

post #9 of 22

Bee you tea full

post #10 of 22

Excellent photos, and an enjoyable trip report for the summer.

 

 When i lived in Mass a recreational liscense was eassy to come by to dive for lobsters when they were moving around inshore-June to October.  Loved bringing out a bag of lobsters and straight home for cooking.

 

 If you do that in Maine you run the risk of a very unpleasant visit in the middle of the night or if the game warden gets you, it is your gear including your car.  There is a recreational lisence for Scallops from 11/1 to 4/1, but I had a terrible dream about getting caught up in a scallop drag and I have not gone back out for them.

post #11 of 22

neat!  the turtle sequence is nice...

post #12 of 22

Phenomenal!  what a great planet we live on.... Thanks very much for that Bazz

post #13 of 22

Baz, any chance you sell photographs to pay the bills?

post #14 of 22

We love free diving for Lobsters.  We used to go to the Abaco's every year for the opener in the Bahamas.  When they moved opening day back to September 1st it killed it for my school age kids and thus, myself.  Nice shots!

post #15 of 22

Bazz, nice work on your "documentary',  we sure had great conditions yesterday for Day 1. Did a 3-tanker up here in Jupiter, not the planet, and hit my bag limit of 12 and took my first red grouper and a couple of his buddies.

 

Your pics shows our Jekyl/Hyde personalties for this planet we inhabit.

 

Here's a pic of my haul, less 5 tails that became dinner.

94 Igloo for reference.

 

PS As of this posting only one body/diver is missing.MiniSeason '10 001 (Medium).JPG

post #16 of 22
Thread Starter 

That there is one good sized Porgy. Eat well.

post #17 of 22

Sweet TR (DR?)

 

 

But this is a lobster:

 

mainelobster109.jpg

 

mmmm claw meat, 2 days away....

post #18 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider View Post

Baz, any chance you sell photographs to pay the bills?


Yup.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by krp8128 View Post

Sweet TR (DR?)

 

 

But this is a lobster:

 

mainelobster109.jpg

 

mmmm claw meat, 2 days away....

I agree whole heartedly. I'm not a big fan of our southern bugs gastronomically, but never scoff at the chance to have a go at an American Lobster, Homaris americanus. When I'm diving off the coast of New Jersey, New York, or New England, I will on occasion hunt for a few of these marvelous beasties. I also rather like the rules of engagement better up north. Down here, you can use SCUBA, a net, and a tickle stick. In the Bahamas you must free dive, but get to use a pole spear. Up north you use your hands, and those claws can give the bugs a bit of a fighting chance.
 

post #19 of 22

Bazz, really fine images.

I was going to post some images of me diggin clams out on the flats in front of my place but  I figured that mud brown not so sexy as Med blue. But there is that image of me taken from behind, bent over, demonstrating what we, in my neck of the woods, call a "Deer Isle Smile."

Nothin a little spackle can't fix, as we say.

David

post #20 of 22

Wow, those are wonderful shots.  For those that have never tried underwater photography it much harder that photography on land.  I've love to have a set up like what you have but for the limited amount of diving I get to do my point and shoot seas life does OK.  My wife and I shot hundreds of pictures last year in Bonaire and I finally got one I am proud of.

post #21 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by deliberate1 View Post
 But there is that image of me taken from behind, bent over, demonstrating what we, in my neck of the woods, call a "Deer Isle Smile."

Nothin a little spackle can't fix, as we say.

David

 

You're quite lithe and slender, so I imagine your Deer Isle Smile is not exceptionally wide. Kind of double dog dare you to post up the shot.

 

I'm a serious clam junkie, but they are not to be found in our local waters. Got to satisfy my habit via the grocery store. If I'm lucky, once or twice a season our fish monger will get some Ipswich/Pisser/Soft-shells, and we'll go to town with the steamer.

Best regards to Mrs. 1.




Quote:
Originally Posted by cstreu1026 View Post

Wow, those are wonderful shots.  For those that have never tried underwater photography it much harder that photography on land.  I've love to have a set up like what you have but for the limited amount of diving I get to do my point and shoot seas life does OK.  My wife and I shot hundreds of pictures last year in Bonaire and I finally got one I am proud of.

Thanks for the kind words cstreu1026. Glad that you're getting some good results with your camera and enjoying your time in the sea. BTW, if you would consider shooting film, then there is a ton of high quality, professional grade equipment to be had for pennies on the dollar. Get back to me if you've any interest and I'll try and point you in the right direction.
 

post #22 of 22


 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bazzer View Post



 

You're quite lithe and slender, so I imagine your Deer Isle Smile is not exceptionally wide. Kind of double dog dare you to post up the shot.

 

 




 

Bazz, this is a family site. Besides, nobody wants to see an old Maine tooshie hangin' over a clam flat at low tide.

 

Right?

D1

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