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Bandana, Balaclava, Facewarmer/Neckwarmer or Something Else? - Page 3

post #61 of 80

When I'm on top of Granite Chief at Squaw and the combination of wind and "snow" is trying to sand-blast me back to my youth, this is my formula:

 

* helmet

* goggles

* Turtle Fur neck gaiter

* Seirus Masque

 

I always thought the Masque was dorky, impractical and uncomfortable until I found conditions that were worse.

 

Personally, I'd never go for the hoodie.  It flies in the face of my a-la-carte layering approach.  My helmet's too tight for anything under it anyway.  The neck gaiter is easy-on, easy-off and sometimes I wear it even when I don't have an insulating upper layer under my jacket.

post #62 of 80

Beard.

 

Has proven effective down to -20 with gusts over 100mph.

 

+ Free

+ Super steezy

+ Chicks love it

+ Highly breathable

+ Functional year round

 

- Hurts pulling ice out

 

post #63 of 80

Most of the men I know with a lot of facial hair have these frozen water falls coming out of their noses down into the beard when it's really frigid.  Looks DISGUSTING.

post #64 of 80


Hey Guys, Derek here from 2B Mask.  Just wanted to let you know of our new face protection products designed to address the short comings and problems associated with a lot of the products out there.  Designed, developed, and handmade in Colorado, the 2B Mask is designed to remain breathable, prevent goggle fog, while keeping your face dry and protected from wind, snow, sun etc.  If any of you have any questions about the product, I'll be around.  www.2bmask.com

productshot.jpg

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by STOKEDinSUMMER View Post

Which do you prefer and why? And are their any problems with any of them?


Hate them all, but when it's really really cold and windy (below zero) I wear a fleece balaclava. When it's just really cold and windy, I have a SmartWool neck gaiter. It's much better than a fleece one, doesn't get all drippy and wet and gross. I also started using a Buff, which is very thin but still protects (I think, never used it in below-zero temps) and is much more comfortable. Gets wet, but dries quickly and doesn't stretch out so much.

 

But unless there is frostbite danger, I don't wear anything.

 

post #65 of 80
This is a great product which seems to be out of business? I was telling some buddies about this mask, which I own leading me to discover the domain name is no longer valid. What a shame. Hopefully someone picks up with this great idea. Solves virtually all the issues associated with most balaclavas.
post #66 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by elduderino View Post

This is a great product which seems to be out of business? I was telling some buddies about this mask, which I own leading me to discover the domain name is no longer valid. What a shame. Hopefully someone picks up with this great idea. Solves virtually all the issues associated with most balaclavas.

 

I'm not surprised this design failed. A face mask that is attached to the goggles is nice in theory, but it falls flat when you take it into practical use. The major flaw is that 99.9% of skiers put their goggles up on their helmet from time to time during the day. With the mask attached to the goggles, you just put your mask over your eyes. It would take me about 10 minutes before I realized that and ditched it. 

post #67 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by freeski919 View Post
 

 

I'm not surprised this design failed. A face mask that is attached to the goggles is nice in theory, but it falls flat when you take it into practical use. The major flaw is that 99.9% of skiers put their goggles up on their helmet from time to time during the day. With the mask attached to the goggles, you just put your mask over your eyes. It would take me about 10 minutes before I realized that and ditched it. 

Well, perhaps a revival is in order since many new schoolers/jibbers wear their goggles under their helmets and pull them down around their necks instead of putting them up on their helmets when not in use?

post #68 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by freeski919 View Post
 

 

I'm not surprised this design failed. A face mask that is attached to the goggles is nice in theory, but it falls flat when you take it into practical use. The major flaw is that 99.9% of skiers put their goggles up on their helmet from time to time during the day. With the mask attached to the goggles, you just put your mask over your eyes. It would take me about 10 minutes before I realized that and ditched it. 

 

That's actually a valid point.  However to me, the advantages out weigh the disadvantages.  I personally only use it when it is REALLY cold/wet.  In those cases I rarely put my goggle up on my helmet because it risks exposing me to cold and/or fogging up the goggles.  The best part of this masks design is that it is not touching our nose and mouth and your breath is able to create a dry warm pocket without fogging the goggles.  It's also fairly quick to put on and take off.  I have one and really appreciate it under certain conditions, but I have to agree with your assessment as a downside to the design.

 

At any rate, it doesn't much matter if they're no longer made.  That being said, I would buy again in a heartbeat if I lost mine and had the option.

post #69 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by freeski919 View Post
 

 

I'm not surprised this design failed. A face mask that is attached to the goggles is nice in theory, but it falls flat when you take it into practical use. The major flaw is that 99.9% of skiers put their goggles up on their helmet from time to time during the day. With the mask attached to the goggles, you just put your mask over your eyes. It would take me about 10 minutes before I realized that and ditched it. 


Goddamn. I guess I'm a 1 percenter. I don't take my goggles off until i get back to the car, and that's when my helmet comes off.

post #70 of 80

Hi all,

I ski at holiday valley in upstate new york, and it gets into single digits before loading onto the high speed chair.

What I use is a performance fleece balacalava with a helmet , then I layer with an Patagonia cap 3,down shirt, pull over Northface fleece, outer shell.

By the time we get to unload on those cold ass days, any exposed skin is frozen,

Hope this helps.

post #71 of 80
I use a turtle fur neck gaiter on super cold days. That's all I need.

Speaking of balaclavas, my son and I overheard a lady going to her car at Mary Jane telling her companion "I need to get my baklava." We weren't sure if her face was cold and her diction was off or if she was craving layered Greek pastry.
post #72 of 80

Wow this thread is old.

 

But i have a relevant contribution - currently using an Arctic Yowie, which is a synthetic thin material like a Buff neck gaiter, but with synthetic fleece at the bottom that you can pull up.

However i find that the material gets damp and cold, and is difficult to breathe through unless its dry.

 

I've just got an icebreaker merino neck gaiter that i've yet to try. I'm hoping it stays more breathable and stays somewhat warm, whether it's wet or not.

post #73 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
 

Well, perhaps a revival is in order since many new schoolers/jibbers wear their goggles under their helmets and pull them down around their necks instead of putting them up on their helmets when not in use?

 

How does that work? I don't think I could get my goggles around my jacket collar with ease, and my collar isn't overly baggy.... When they talk, are they breathing into the goggles and fogging them up? 

post #74 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post

How does that work? I don't think I could get my goggles around my jacket collar with ease, and my collar isn't overly baggy.... When they talk, are they breathing into the goggles and fogging them up? 

That's how I used to do it before helmets became popular. I would just pull the goggles down around my neck-- the strap could go inside of my jacket collar. I never put them up on my forehead. That would have been the gaper position.
post #75 of 80

...something else -

 

MFI™ magnetic facemask integration

 

http://www.anonoptics.com/goggles/mens/mig

 

 

 

post #76 of 80

I don't like a wad of fabric around my neck even more than I don't like anything across my face.

 

My preference as the temperature drops--

--Just the helmet

--Add a fleece helmet liner

--Change to a thin fleece balaclava

 

I sometimes wear around my neck a 35" square silk scarf bought from a western wear shop--like a cowboy wears to a Saturday night dance.  Doesn't absorb moisture like cotton, doesn't create a big wad of fabric like fleece.

 

It is all about what YOU like.

post #77 of 80
I have a silk balaclava I bought many years ago. I have never found anything that works as well for me.
post #78 of 80

NINJA MASK!

post #79 of 80
post #80 of 80
Once the snow packs on the face, and you have completely lost sensation over the mandibular branch of the trigeminal nerve, with a full bilateral facial nerve palsy, it stays pretty warm.
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