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Heat moulded liners, good or bad?

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

I've read that heat moulded liners can be a bad idea, that it's best to get natural fitting boots for comfort and performance for far longer.

 

What does everyone think? Are they a good idea or not? 

post #2 of 8

SkiingMan,

 

Welcome to Epic!  If you want more information than you can stand, you're in the right place.

 

First, I have Intuition Heat Moldable Liners and love them.  I know of no one that has made a statement supporting your concerns.

 

If you mean by "...best to get natural fitting boots.." properly fitted boots, that is a true statement but heat molded boots can be properly fitted. 

 

Use the search function located up top.  Search on Intuition Liners, then search on Conformable and finally search on Ziptfit.  You'll have plenty.

 

I only have used the Intuition liners so I have nothing to compare to as far as brand goes.  Many folks replace their stock liners with moldable liners so I find it funny that someone is recommending to you not to use them.

 

Ken

post #3 of 8

I have the Intuition HM liners too, and L&AirC is right on - I love them, and I've never really experienced or heard of any drawbacks; they're a huge step up from the stock liners I've used.

post #4 of 8

The caveat would be that the shells still have to properly fitted to your feet, i.e., heat moldable liners will not make up for a shell that is wrong for your feet.

post #5 of 8

Hi SkiingMan,

Unsure if you are referring to the heat mold-able stock liner. Saw in your other post concerning Salomon Falcon boots. I ski in the Falcon 9, though the liner can be heat molded. I choose to mold them by skiing in them. I do not think there is any drawback to not heating or heating a stock mold-able liner, heating it makes the break in process shorter. Hopefully this was what you were asking. 

post #6 of 8
Thread Starter 

Thanks guys, you're great! I'm really glad to have finally found a good ski forum. 

 

The reason I asked was because I found this following the link:

 

http://www.freezeproshop.com/boot-fit.irs

 

 

"Heat moulded liners

In the 90s there was a huge explosion in heat moulded liners and heat moulding in-store where the liners are heated up and the customer puts their foot in the boot as it cools and ‘moulds’ to their feet. Freeze doesn’t totally buy into heat moulding as it only really speeds up the natural process, however it also warms the boot up and softens the plastics giving a potentially unrealistic impression of comfort. Remember that when you are riding they will be at or below zero degrees so the plastics and rubbers will be much stiffer. Furthermore, the shape of your feet when riding will be different to the shape of your foot in a shop when you’ve been wearing regular footwear.. It’s worth a day or so discomfort for perfect natural fitting boots that will match the shape of your foot and bed in gradually at the same time as your feet change shape to get used to their new surroundings, this will provide comfort and performance for far longer."

 

I'm fairly new to skiing so I'm unsure of some of the jargon. I'm guessing by stock liner you mean just standard liners that come with the boot? I think I'll ignore the above paragraph and assume that heat moulding is great after all. I'm hoping to get some new boots for the first time soon as it'll be cheaper to buy out of season. Falcon CS is one which I'm considering, I'm guessing they come with pretty good liners and the custom shell option seems really attractive. Thanks for your input guys.  

post #7 of 8

There are some great boot fitters on EPICSKI, and you can access them on a different forum (see: Ask The Boot Guys).  Regardless, injected foam liners have been around since the 1970's (still around) with a lot of current popularity going to the Intuition-type liner.  I use Intuition liners, and IMO there is no way it softens up the shell enough to make it more flexible.  All you do is warm them up in a convection oven.  Does the foot change that much from the shop to the snow?   If it does, I always figured that is what micro adjustments on the buckles are for.  Of course, if the shell doesn't fit your foot properly I suppose no liner will help that much.  The boot fitters here will know.

post #8 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiingMan View Post

Thanks guys, you're great! I'm really glad to have finally found a good ski forum. 

 

The reason I asked was because I found this following the link:

 

http://www.freezeproshop.com/boot-fit.irs

 

 

"Heat moulded liners

In the 90s there was a huge explosion in heat moulded liners and heat moulding in-store where the liners are heated up and the customer puts their foot in the boot as it cools and ‘moulds’ to their feet. Freeze doesn’t totally buy into heat moulding as it only really speeds up the natural process, however it also warms the boot up and softens the plastics giving a potentially unrealistic impression of comfort. Remember that when you are riding they will be at or below zero degrees so the plastics and rubbers will be much stiffer. Furthermore, the shape of your feet when riding will be different to the shape of your foot in a shop when you’ve been wearing regular footwear.. It’s worth a day or so discomfort for perfect natural fitting boots that will match the shape of your foot and bed in gradually at the same time as your feet change shape to get used to their new surroundings, this will provide comfort and performance for far longer."

 

I'm fairly new to skiing so I'm unsure of some of the jargon. I'm guessing by stock liner you mean just standard liners that come with the boot? I think I'll ignore the above paragraph and assume that heat moulding is great after all. I'm hoping to get some new boots for the first time soon as it'll be cheaper to buy out of season. Falcon CS is one which I'm considering, I'm guessing they come with pretty good liners and the custom shell option seems really attractive. Thanks for your input guys.  

 

I would say you should stay away from that shop entirely.

 

Intuition liners are heated out of the shell. The shell remains at room temperature, and is no softer than any other boot you try on. Further, the type of foam used in the intuition liner can't be "worn" into shape. It is a memory foam that once cooled will retain its shape. Wearing the boots for a day or two will not cause the liners to mold to your foot.

 

Many ski boots now come with intuition liners as the stock liner. They are superior to any of the older style liners.
 

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