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How to give gear advice- 101

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 

Step 1- read the 'question' from the person looking for advice.

 

Step 2- did you read ALL of the words? Seriously, go back and make sure you didn't get hung-up on one specific word like: Powder or Ice or High Speed. There were other 'bits', did you pay attention?

 

Step 3- Who is the OP? A guy? adjust ability down. A girl? Leave ability alone or adjust up slightly.

 

Step 4- What type of jargon is the OP using? Adjust for ability like this: 'Double diamond'- down, High Speed- down, no-fall-super-duper-gnar- way, way down, 'I used to race'- down, 'back in the day'-down, etc.

 

Step 5 - remove yourself from the equation. The OP is looking for advice for gear she/he wants to use for the type of use she/he wants to use it for. You don't matter. At all.

 

Step 6- where is the OP located and where does the OP actually spend their time skiing?

 

Step 7- Do you have any 'real-world' experience that will help? Yes? Cool, post it. No? Sit back and let others post first, odds are you'll get a chance to post something dumb a little later in the thread.

 

Step 8- Keep it SIMPLE. Most people asking for advice on the internet (or in a ski shop/ car dealership/ bike shop) want some help to understand what it is they are looking for and what it is that will allow them to go do something. They don't want to be bombarded with technical specifications or argue semantics. They want a tool to help with a task, not to pass a vocabulary test. If they want specific details they WILL ask.

 

Here's the deal- 9 out of 10 people who are looking for new skis aren't looking for a complete specialty ski... if they are they usually stress that. So preaching that "a crud ski isn't a powder ski, they have different qualities", while true in many respects, is not helpful when the OP is looking to complement an RX8 and asks for a ski "for trees, powder, crud and cut-up... that can handle bumps and ice... at Watchusett". Sure for powder in trees in a vacuum the newest whiz-bang reverse sidecut rockered wonder ski would be better than a Watea 94... that's not helpful to a fellow who wants to ski mixed snow conditions, in New England, on something other than a race carver. chances are that fellow wants something he can use more than 3 days a season. A 'compromise ski' may be in order.

 

 

Make sense?

 

 


 

post #2 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post
 Sit back and let others post first, odds are you'll get a chance to post something dumb a little later in the thread.

 


 


Thought I'd break this suggestion right away.

post #3 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post

Thought I'd break this suggestion right away.


You're doing it wrong. Find someone looking for an all mountain ski and suggest a race-stock GS ski.

post #4 of 21

Everything is a compromise.  The do everything ski does not exist yet.  You have to put up with some deficiencies in one area in order to get acceptable in other areas.  If very high speeds are a requirement, then I would err on the high speed side of the equation.

Would you rather ski a race stock SG ski in powder or ski a powder ski on hard snow at DH speeds?

Both suck, but one is more likely to get you killed.

post #5 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

Everything is a compromise.  The do everything ski does not exist yet.  You have to put up with some deficiencies in one area in order to get acceptable in other areas.  If very high speeds are a requirement, then I would err on the high speed side of the equation.

Would you rather ski a race stock SG ski in powder or ski a powder ski on hard snow at DH speeds?

Both suck, but one is more likely to get you killed.


SG skis at 90 billjion miles an hour down the steepest mogul run ever is more likely to get your killed. 

 

oh wait never mind this is easy.

post #6 of 21

I vote for Sticky!

post #7 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post

I vote for Sticky!


Ditto.
 

post #8 of 21

Have a feeling this is related to the other thread on "nimble" skis that can go downhill speeds. All excellent suggestions, and assume someone like Whiteroom who has to deal effectively one on one with customers learned these early by heart. I'll add one, though, specifically for another attribute of EPIC online, education:

 

Step 9: Once you've read all the question, not gotten hung up on individual words or phrases, adjusted for jargon etc., then examine the logic. Do the various stated gear desires (premises) hang together and follow one another to a reasonable conclusion, or do they produce contradictions? If they are inconsistent, or if the outcome just can't follow from the premises, point this out, since IMO EPIC's major function is not skiing advice (conclusions) but skiing education (learning how to put together an effective argument) (Or turn.)

 

Don't disagree with me on this one, go find Einstein. He (and a bunch of other bright guys) always stressed the question over the answer.

post #9 of 21
Thread Starter 


 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post

Step 9: Once you've read all the question, not gotten hung up on individual words or phrases, adjusted for jargon etc., then examine the logic. Do the various stated gear desires (premises) hang together and follow one another to a reasonable conclusion, or do they produce contradictions? If they are inconsistent, or if the outcome just can't follow from the premises, point this out, since IMO EPIC's major function is not skiing advice (conclusions) but skiing education (learning how to put together an effective argument) (Or turn.)

 

Don't disagree with me on this one, go find Einstein. He (and a bunch of other bright guys) always stressed the question over the answer.

There are folks who want to debate/ hash out/ analyze ski design minutia... there are others who do NOT, some of these people stumble upon ES and ask questions. So, I don't disagree that often people want a set of attributes that are mutually exclusive, I'll also agree that informing/ educating them about this is a nice little side-service of Epicski. However, there are times when one can simply recognize what is being sought, and what is appropriate, by simply 'filtering' the static: bump performance for a powder ski would be an obvious example. You don't have to tell someone that "you can't ski moguls well on anything that isn't a dedicated mogul ski..." what they want is a ski for powder that is least bad for moguls. For the life of me I can't understand how someone as intelligent as you fails to grasp that.
 

post #10 of 21



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

 

 

Step 2- did you read ALL of the words? Seriously, go back and make sure you didn't get hung-up on one specific word like: Powder or Ice or High Speed. There were other 'bits', did you pay attention?

 


 


Also make sure you didn't miss anything, like "nimble"
 

post #11 of 21
Thread Starter 

OK, new rule: Wait till post #10 in any gear thread before posting. All of you.

post #12 of 21

 

The answer is:

 

Kästle SG .

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Post #12, did I do it right?  

post #13 of 21
Thread Starter 

That would be 'Kastle RX12 National Team SG 208cm' to you, civilian, get it right. Post #12 is fine.

post #14 of 21

To preface this, bow about a template for the person who is asking for advice? Who (s)he is, where (s)he is... what have they liked in the past, what they didn't like in the past, WHAT boots do they have..if no boots yet..focus there then come back. I am sure more can be brought here. If we get this set up as a two parter, it would be a good wiki. 

post #15 of 21

^^

That was the correct answer 25 years ago, but surely something better has come down the pipe since then.

 

PS. Do you think the tails are upturned enough to count as twin-tips.

post #16 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

PS. Do you think the tails are upturned enough to count as twin-tips.


I'm removing myself from the equation.   

 

And the proof is:  I have yet to point out that 208cm is really quite short.    

post #17 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post

To preface this, bow about a template for the person who is asking for advice? Who (s)he is, where (s)he is... what have they liked in the past, what they didn't like in the past, WHAT boots do they have..if no boots yet..focus there then come back. I am sure more can be brought here. If we get this set up as a two parter, it would be a good wiki. 

 

Isn't making sure these questions are answered on every individual thread = price of admission for credibility of answers?
 

post #18 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post




I'm removing myself from the equation.   

 

And the proof is:  I have yet to point out that 208cm is really quite short.    


Well, yes 208 cm is really a bit short, especially if you want to ski low slope deep snow, but back when I weighed 140 lbs I found the 215s were just a little too much work blasting through the moguls at Tremblant, and the 208s were stable enough, much stabler than the longest Dynastar GS I could find back then.  Then again, if I didn't suck at moguls so much, maybe I would have been happy with the 215s.

post #19 of 21

I think the template idea is a good one, at least for folks who are coming in new and haven't skied anything  "new" (meaning in the last 3 years), it would help to at least focus the thought process. it gets tricky at some point with itmes like rocker for instance.  not all want or like tail rocker in a pow or any ski for that matter. Hey how about the stock answer is " call your local mountain or shop to find out when will be their demo days?  

post #20 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

Everything is a compromise.  The do everything ski does not exist yet.  You have to put up with some deficiencies in one area in order to get acceptable in other areas.  If very high speeds are a requirement, then I would err on the high speed side of the equation.

Would you rather ski a race stock SG ski in powder or ski a powder ski on hard snow at DH speeds?

Both suck, but one is more likely to get you killed.

Agreed. There is no "silver approach" to ski gear. The most important thing isn't making sure your gear is "the best" overall, but that it's a good fit for the environment where you're skiing.

post #21 of 21
Thread Starter 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Macnol View Post

Agreed. There is no "silver approach" to ski gear. The most important thing isn't making sure your gear is "the best" overall, but that it's a good fit for the environment where you're skiing.


Some advice: Run away from Epicski now. Run fast, run far. You are still thinking clearly.

 

http://www.thingsbearslove.com/

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