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Using a car as a hot box?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

I'm considering using my car as a hot box this weekend.  Mostly curious to know if this is a bad idea, for the skis and/or for the car's interior.

 

* The skis currently have a storage coat on them.  Should I scrape before doing this to prevent wax from getting on the upholstery?

* Is wax likely to get on the upholstery even if I do scrape them?

* My plan of attack:  The high on Saturday is forecast to be 88F.  I'm thinking that means the temp inside the car will get into the right range.  My plan is to put a thermometer in the car, then check it around 3pm.  If the interior temp is too high, I'll wait until it gets low enough, then put the skis in.  Then I'll check the thermometer again every 30 minutes or so.

I'm kind of wondering if this might result in me only getting 3 hours or so of good temps.  I've heard that you should hot box for something like 6 hours.  Should I even bother?

 

I've thought about this a lot, but I'm just curious to know if anybody can think of something I forgot to consider, or if you think this is a really stupid idea in general.  Thanks!

post #2 of 16

Why would you want to do this anyway? Hotbox is good to save you some work, when you have 30, 40 pairs or more to prepare. Otherwise you can do same things with iron. And you do it better with iron then with hotbox. So unless you have 30 pairs of skis to prepare till end of week, don't bother with this and use iron.

post #3 of 16

I don't know if your post or the last Family Guy was funnier. 

 

OK, the inside of your car will get about 18F degrees hotter than the outside temperature when the sun is out starting in the late morning (greenhouse effect).  You don't want to go above much above 130 degrees F to protect the PTEX, not warp the skis, etc.  In theory, your car as a hotbox could work if you could keep the temperature in the right range for 5 hours or so.  But you can't keep the temperature reasonably constant, so open the garage door and start ironing in a few layers of wax.  Or have a shop hotbox the skis for you.  Or build your own hotbox for around $50 and rent it our for beer.  Myth: BUSTED.

post #4 of 16

The last time I used my car as a hot box, I almost drove the wrong way on the 401. 

 

If you want a hotbox, just build one; your car won't be temperature controlled well enough.

post #5 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

The last time I used my car as a hot box, I almost drove the wrong way on the 401. 

 

If you want a hotbox, just build one; your car won't be temperature controlled well enough.


Wasn't that just last year?

post #6 of 16

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by quant2325 View Post

I don't know if your post or the last Family Guy was funnier. 

 

OK, the inside of your car will get about 18F degrees hotter than the outside temperature when the sun is out starting in the late morning (greenhouse effect).  You don't want to go above much above 130 degrees F to protect the PTEX, not warp the skis, etc.  In theory, your car as a hotbox could work if you could keep the temperature in the right range for 5 hours or so.  But you can't keep the temperature reasonably constant, so open the garage door and start ironing in a few layers of wax.  Or have a shop hotbox the skis for you.  Or build your own hotbox for around $50 and rent it our for beer.  Myth: BUSTED.


I thought first of Red Green. You know how Red's projects all turn out, right?

 

Chase, you are a creative thinker, for sure. Its a very green idea. I've seen skis that were ruined in a box by too much heat and it was a very sad thing.

 

Keep those ideas rolling. You'll have one that'll make you rich someday.
 

post #7 of 16
Thread Starter 

Thank you all for your opinions - I appreciate them.

 

Unfortunately taking them to a shop for hotboxing is probably not an option - at least, I don't know of any shops in my area (Indianapolis) that offer that service.  I'll think some more about ironing versus building a hotbox.  My main objection to building one is just that we plan to move soon so I'm already in that "let's not accumulate more stuff" mode.

 

Anyway, thanks again!

post #8 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by chase View Post
  I'll think some more about ironing versus building a hotbox.


Have a look around here for some of the threads that talk about the total number of  heat/scrape/Brush cycles, not just heat cycles.

post #9 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by slider View Post




Wasn't that just last year?


It seems like just a few minutes; how long ago was it really?

 

 

edit: 1976


Edited by Ghost - 7/17/10 at 5:58am
post #10 of 16

What were we talking about.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post




It seems like just a few minutes; how long ago was it really?

 

 

edit: 1976

post #11 of 16

exactly

post #12 of 16

Chase, What kind of skiing do you do? MR

post #13 of 16

I'm pretty sure I could do it out back without a car this weekend

post #14 of 16
Thread Starter 

MastersRacer:

 

Mostly NASTAR in the midwest, and I shoot for a trip out West every year or so where I'll try to experience the whole mountain except for double-blacks, which I don't feel ready for yet.

post #15 of 16
post #16 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by quant2325 View Post

I don't know if your post or the last Family Guy was funnier. 

 

OK, the inside of your car will get about 18F degrees hotter than the outside temperature when the sun is out starting in the late morning (greenhouse effect).  You don't want to go above much above 130 degrees F to protect the PTEX, not warp the skis, etc.  In theory, your car as a hotbox could work if you could keep the temperature in the right range for 5 hours or so.  But you can't keep the temperature reasonably constant, so open the garage door and start ironing in a few layers of wax.  Or have a shop hotbox the skis for you.  Or build your own hotbox for around $50 and rent it our for beer.  Myth: BUSTED.


You need to conduct an experiment before a myth can be confirmed or busted, everything else is just conjecture.

Maybe I just didn't get the joke, using a car as a hotbox sounded like a good idea to me so I decided to give it a try today.

The plan was to give a set of freshly stoneground skis a thick coating of Toko yellow hydrocarbon wax, put them in the car on top of the headrests (out of the direct sunlight) then monitor the temperatures every 1/2 hour and open doors or windows if it looks like it might get too hot. BTW the car is a dark colored wagon.

11:30 am
Ambient air temperature 20c (68F)
Internal car temperature 42c (108F)

I had the doors open for 10 minutes getting everything set up and newspaper to protect the upholstry from dripping wax, but before I opened the doors the internal temperature was 50c (122F) so it bodes well for getting into the right temperature range.

12:00 Midday
Ambient air temperature 22c (72F)
Internal car temperature 49c (120F)

It felt like the skis were not up to this temperature yet and the wax was still solid.

12:45pm
Ambient air temperature 23c (73F)
Internal car temperature 55c (131F)

Wax was starting to get a little soft but the skis are still probably still cooler than the air temperature. At this point I thought the temperature probe may be providing inaccurate results because it was closer to the roof of the car than the skis were so I shifted the position of the probe to the level of the skis.

1:30pm
Ambient air temperature 23c (73F)
Internal car temperature 54c (129F)

2pm
Ambient air temperature 22c (72F)
Internal car temperature 56c (133F)

Wax quite soft but not liquid

2:30pm
Ambient air temperature 24c (75F)
Internal car temperature 57c (135F)

I opened the door for a minute to drop the temperature slightly. Wax is very soft but not liquid

3:00pm
Ambient air temperature 23c (73F)
Internal car temperature 58c (136F)

I opened the car door for a minute to drop the temperature to 55c (131F). Wax is very soft but not liquid.

3:30pm
Ambient air temperature 23c (73F)
Internal car temperature 58c (136F)

I opened the car door for a minute to drop the temperature to 55c (131F). Wax is very soft but not liquid.

4:15pm
Ambient air temperature 22c (72F)
Internal car temperature 57c (135)

5:00pm
Ambient air temperature 20c (68F)
Internal car temperature 55c (131F)

Cooling down now so will let it cool down by itself over the evening.

 


Conclusion: Myth confirmed

A car can definitely get up to hot box temperatures without it needing to be an exceptionally hot day. Inside the car was an average of 34C (61F) higher than ambient air temperature. The mass of the car acted as a big heatsink meaning temperature changes were very slow so there is minimal risk of inadvertently exposing skis to too high temperatures. The wax got soft and mushy but not liquid so the temperatures were certainly safe. There was no dripping of wax and no mess on the interior of the car.

I will definitely be putting my other skis through this same process in the coming weeks.

Pros
Zero cost
Can see the skis through the windows to see if it is working
Slow temperature changes means overcooking unlikely
Temperature control easy by opening doors and windows

Cons
Weather dependant, can't do it during winter
No automatic temperature control - need to check regularly

 

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