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My summer restoration project - 1996 Cannondale Super V 2000 (suggestions?)

post #1 of 39
Thread Starter 

Once upon a time, this particular ride was my very first full suspension bike and the love of my life. Shortly after I got her she got a new rear triangle, new wheels, and disc brakes. After several very happy and confidence inspiring years, I upgraded to a 2001 Cannondale Jekyll for added help on the climbs. The disc brakes and wheels were swapped between the bikes and the Super V was delivered to the youngest son with the understanding that he would take care of it.

 

The years went by, stuff happened, and we were told to come repossess the bike this summer. When I saw her again for the first time, I almost cried! My stealthy paint job was trashed, the rear shock was shot, all the cables were frozen, the bottom bracket was crunchy, there was damage to the frame, and she looked like CRAP! The following pics show just some of the damage that has been wrought on my "beastie".DSCF2721.JPG

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DSCF2723.JPGDSCF2724.JPGDSCF2725.JPGDSCF2728.JPG

 

Fortunately, we have a previously rebuilt shock that will fit it and I had disc rims (Mavic 117) and hubs (XT) to build up. Hubby found some Shimano mechanical disc brakes with Avid levers and an XT crank with 175mm arms as the one on it currently are 180mm. I ordered Jagwire cables and housings (still waiting on the shift kit). Here's the shiny new bits and the wheels I built.

DSCF2733.JPG

 

I started the tear-down/clean-up process this week:

DSCF2735.JPGDSCF2767.JPG

 

After today's work:

IMG_0051.JPGIMG_0052.JPG

 

 

Yucky, yucky bottom bracket....ewwwwwww.

IMG_0050.JPG

 

 

The derailleurs cleaned up really nicely with some scrubbing. A quick lube job means they're functioning perfectly.

DSCF2765.JPG

 

The only things left still to be removed are the pivot bearings in the swing arm and the 1.5 to 1 1/8 adapters and headset cups in the frame. Since we don't have bearing or headset removal tools, I let hubby deal with these rather than risk trashing the bearings and cups.

 

Now I have some choices to make and would like some input: do I try to preserve most of the original paint, do I have it repainted to replicate the original look, or do I get a custom paint job? I'm considering getting the custom paint to match this (black frame, flames on downtube to bottom bracket, green swing arm):

LottaLove.JPG

 

What would the biker Bears do?

 

My next conundrum concerns the drivetrain: keep the original SRAM Attack grip shifters and XT rear derailleur, or switch to SRAM X.5 triggers with an X.7 rear? (This just happens to be what we have hanging out as extra parts right now).

 

Let me know what you think!

I'll update the story and pics as the summer and rebuild progresses.

post #2 of 39

In 1996, I remember being in a bike shop, seeing my first Super V, and thinking "What would this look like with all the paint removed?"

Years later, in a different LBS, I found my bike for sale, for $500. It was a highly modified Super V which the previous owner had stripped of all paint, all decals. The Marzocchi front suspension-fork lower tubes had been painted flaming metallic orange. Let me tell you, this bike is stunningly gorgeous in raw form. The high-quality welded seams are pristine. The flying buttresses that support the intricately shaped top tube are sculptural triumphs. Much like metallic paint on a curvaceous sports car, the reflective surface accentuates the 3-dimensional shape. Do a Google image-search on a Mazda Miata, compare a picture of a silver one with a picture of a white one, and you will see what I mean. The white one looks like a bean. The silver one looks like sex on a hot griddle.

 

Another advantage of removing the paint is that it is much easier to periodically inspect the frame for stress cracks, always a good idea on an aluminum frame.

 

And then there is the advantage of no longer worrying about scratching the paint.

 

And the braided cables that you have ready look EVEN MORE AWESOME on a bare aluminum bike. You can tell people it is neutronium-powered and they will believe you. It's from space.

 

My bike is currently languishing in the garage, as I save up for a modern replacement of the no-longer-rebuilt-let-alone-made Fox Alps rear shock, a new crank and bottom bracket, and a replacement for the front Magura hydraulic brake, cannibalized for another bike. You are very lucky to have had a shock replacement at hand!

 

I wish you the best of luck in your rebuild!

-Dael

post #3 of 39
Thread Starter 

If you're handy and can get generic parts, there's directions on the net for rebuilding the Alps shocks. Another option is to check and see if Push Industries is still able to rebuild them. Fortunately, hubby is a maintenance man and is pretty darned handy with that kind of thing - he'll be rebuilding the original shock as the new back-up. He's also rebuilt a couple for the "old style" V frame.

 

I've actually seen the frame in polished aluminum and it IS stunning! We built up a polished "old style" Super V for my daughter-in-law and it looks really sharp - here's hers:

NancySuperV.jpg

 

I've since discovered that the original paint on mine is a standard black satin and I've touched up the main frame. It's now waiting for a high-grit sand job, a final coat, and the clear coat. The swingarm is painted GM #7180, so I need to pick up a can and get that done.

 

My shift cables/housings came in this week and I'll be picking those up on Friday :-)

post #4 of 39
Thread Starter 

Here's the finished beast:

 

40734_1550633079006_1030482850_31591656_969487_n.jpg

 

37138_1550633479016_1030482850_31591660_715983_n.jpg

 

37138_1550633399014_1030482850_31591658_7596502_n.jpg

 

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37138_1550633359013_1030482850_31591657_3720181_n.jpg

 

37138_1550633519017_1030482850_31591661_5153345_n.jpg

 

Full specs: 1996 Super V 2000 frame with 1999 Super V Active swing arm, Fox Alps 4 rear shock, 1998 RockShox Judy XL front fork, and Cane Creek Double Xc headset. XT Hollowgram crankset (44/32/22) with XT bottom bracket, Salsa bash guard, and Nashbar SPD pedals. Shimano XT disc hubs laced to Mavic X117 rims with IRC tubes and IRC Mythos XC II tires. Shimano mechanical disc calipers clamping onto Avid rotors, operated with Avid 2.0 Speed Dial levers and Jagwire cables and housings. SRAM X.5 trigger shifters operating XT front and SRAM X.7 rear derailleurs via Jagwire cables and housings. SRAM 9 speed 11-34 cassette. Race Face Ride riser bar (purchased off e-bay for an amazing $.99!!) with Ritchey Comp 1 1/8 x 31.8 x 100 x 5 deg stem and SRAM grips. Kalloy seat post (temporary) sporting a Susan G. Komen edition Terry Butterfly. Final touches of Cannondale swing arm guard, water bottle cages, and seat pack coming soon.

post #5 of 39

Sweet!  Youngest son is going to want that back...

 

Mike

post #6 of 39
Thread Starter 

Yeah.............NO.

 

Turns out both the original and replacement rear shocks are having issues (original is shot, replacement won't hold air), but even with a leaking shock, she is buttery smooth. I'd forgotten how fun she is to ride.


Edited by volklgirl - 11/6/10 at 9:53pm
post #7 of 39

Do you know the i2i and stroke on your shock? I have one that's destined for the trash....

post #8 of 39
Thread Starter 

IIRC, i2i is either 5.25" or 5.75", stroke is, maybe, 1.5" or 2.25"? I can check tomorrow after my ride night.

 

If you're willing to sell it, we can at least pirate parts from it even if the i2i is wrong?

post #9 of 39
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dael Franke View Post
My bike is currently languishing in the garage, as I save up for a modern replacement of the no-longer-rebuilt-let-alone-made Fox Alps rear shock, a new crank and bottom bracket, and a replacement for the front Magura hydraulic brake, cannibalized for another bike. You are very lucky to have had a shock replacement at hand!

 

I wish you the best of luck in your rebuild!

-Dael

BTW...Push no longer rebuilds the Alps, but Risse Racing will for $80.
 

post #10 of 39

 I love what you have done with your Super V by giving it life again; I have to say I am chuffed to see that you have kept it original or as original as you could as it is quite hard to source NOS parts for that classic look.

 

To be honest though I think I may have been reduced to tears if I had of seen it when you got her back again, I know they are designed to hardcore ride but to me now they are meant to be treated like gracious beautiful old ladies

 

How many Super V's do you own? Is it just the one? I love the ball burnished one that you show (your daughter-in-laws) I want to get an original v 3000 model in this colour as it is stunning, I have always loved the Super V more than any other dale model except the Raven I & II models as they are effectively Super V's, there is just something about them that sets them out amongst the rest.

 

I have 2 Super V's and 1 Super V Raven and I adore them I think I am a real lucky guy as my Super V 900 is super rare I got her from a chap that works within the carbon structure team for Ferrari F1 cars. He very kindly delivered it to me and he told me the tale of this bike because I was stunned that I had never seen this colour let alone it to have a carbon swingarm Very Happy.

He told me that Cannondale were involved some what with the F1 circuit during the 90's and he spotted a Super V that was on the top of a Volvo estate that a dale rep was driving around. The chap that I bought it from told me that he asked the rep where he could get his hands on a Super V and that the rep had told him that he could get him a custom jobie Super V for some sort of carbon info that Cannondale were after at that time.

 

Here are my old beautiful babies

 

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post #11 of 39
Thread Starter 

Love the carbon swing arm and the Moto!!!

 

At this time we only have my V 2000, but we've built several for other family members:

 

My beastie as originally built (circa 2001)

Kris's Super V.jpg

 

Hubby's Super V 1000, now owned and ridden by the eldest son (and upgraded to an ELO Lefty fork)

Chet's Super V.jpg

 

The daughter-in-law's

NancySuperV.jpg

 

The brother-in-law's

RodsSuperV.JPG

 

My mom also has a 1998 mango Super V 1000, but for some reason I don't have pics of it

post #12 of 39

Does eldest son honor the tradition more than youngest son?  Or will you have another restoration project for next summer?

 

Kids...

 

Mike

 

ps, love the bikes.


Edited by habacomike - 11/4/10 at 9:37pm
post #13 of 39

I love the juxtaposition of the XT thumbies with the carbon swingarm.

 

VG - did you ever check I2I? Just to be clear, the shock I have is a coil-over Fox Vanilla '98 vintage or so. I can't remember if I ever even used it, it may have been a spare or a for a project that never happened.

post #14 of 39

WOW! some serious Super V's in your family I on the other hand am the sole owner of Super V's or any bike for that matter, I have 5 bro's and 2 sisters but not one of them cycle or like bikes an can't understand my love of them so I envy you. I really like your daughter-in-law's V I have always loved ball burnished frames I used to own a stunning Manitou FS that was burnished but never a SV and I want one. I have been toying with the idea of getting another V or maybe a Raven MKI have you or anyone in your family owned a Raven MKI I just wondered what you thought compared to the V's what would you go for? do you have any more pics of your bro-in-law's one it's a bit fuzzy but looks gorgeous but all yours look gorgeous and I am a bit jealous but pleased to speak to serious V fans

 

This is my old Manitou that I sold and regret to this day 5534.jpg

post #15 of 39

I'm surprised the frame came with a standard rear disc mount.  Back then few frames had disc mounts and those that did had a variety of different set-up. 

post #16 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rio View Post

I'm surprised the frame came with a standard rear disc mount.  Back then few frames had disc mounts and those that did had a variety of different set-up. 



Not that rare really I had a Raven MKI that was a few years older than volkgirls and it was fully set up with discs I think the higher models 2000, 3000 had discs or the option to have them fitted on, my old SV2000 with the box swingarm it even had disc eyelets, volks 2000 being a top model would have had them due to it being thus.

post #17 of 39
Thread Starter 

I demoed a Raven and loved the ride but couldn't stand the funky, hollow sound it made, so I opted out. I still think it's a think of beauty though.

 

Yes, eldest son is treating the bike as he should. He rides it hard but never puts it away wet . In fact, he was the one that doled out for the Lefty on it. He was also the one that did the polishing job on his wife's to make it look sooooo stunning.

 

I2I on the current shock is 5.25" but that frame/swingarm combination will take up to 5.75" if need be.

 

Oh, and I LOVE the number of SPIN rims that are showing up on this thread !!


Edited by volklgirl - 11/5/10 at 7:44pm
post #18 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by volklgirl View Post

I2I on the current shock is 5.25" but that frame/swingarm combination will take up to 5.75" if need be.


Oh well, 6.5" probably wouldn't work then.

post #19 of 39


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by blackadder View Post





Not that rare really I had a Raven MKI that was a few years older than volkgirls and it was fully set up with discs I think the higher models 2000, 3000 had discs or the option to have them fitted on, my old SV2000 with the box swingarm it even had disc eyelets, volks 2000 being a top model would have had them due to it being thus.

 

I volunteer at our local bike kitchen.  Many of the bikes of that vintage we get in are Treks, Gary Fishers, GTs and Schwinn.  The Treks & Gary Fishers usually require an adapter.  The GT LTS, which was a popular model around here, don't have any disc mounts.  The Schwinns use a 22mm Hayes specific mount that's inside the rear triangle.  There are adapters but they don't leave enough room inside the triangle.

post #20 of 39


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rio View Post


 

 

I volunteer at our local bike kitchen.  Many of the bikes of that vintage we get in are Treks, Gary Fishers, GTs and Schwinn.  The Treks & Gary Fishers usually require an adapter.  The GT LTS, which was a popular model around here, don't have any disc mounts.  The Schwinns use a 22mm Hayes specific mount that's inside the rear triangle.  There are adapters but they don't leave enough room inside the triangle.


You are absolutely right with what you say, but all of them pre date volklgirl's bike, well the swingarm at least, this swinger is a late model this is what's driving me nuts as the swingarm looks like a later edition. My 1000FR just missed the disc mounts by a year and mine is a 98 by rights her dale should be without disc mounts and the swinger should match the frame colour (I have posted a picture of a 96 V 2000 for reference) never the less it's hot and I love it. Funny that you mentioned the LTS not to have disc mounts I had a team LTS and an LTS1 both disc but they again were late models and they were not using A2Z adapters either.

 

PB160039.preview.JPG

 

DSC_9535.jpg

post #21 of 39
Thread Starter 

Blackadder, you are absolutely right. The first C-dales to have disc mounts standard appeared in the 1999 model year (to the best of my knowledge). My 96 came with a different swingarm without disc tabs that had all the paint removed. I upgraded to a 99 Active 100 swingarm shortly after I got the bike in 2000. Besides the disc tabs, the change in swingarm allows use of a slightly longer shock as well.

post #22 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by volklgirl View Post

Blackadder, you are absolutely right. The first C-dales to have disc mounts standard appeared in the 1999 model year (to the best of my knowledge). My 96 came with a different swingarm without disc tabs that had all the paint removed. I upgraded to a 99 Active 100 swingarm shortly after I got the bike in 2000. Besides the disc tabs, the change in swingarm allows use of a slightly longer shock as well.



Ah! I see now the puzzle falls into place I was a bit baffled to say the least but it was not the first time I had seen this, nether the less it suits it and it makes it an awesome machine I really like this bike it just looks the part, you must be proud. I think it is what is termed now as an Uberdale? or something like that, can I ask what a longer shock fell like on a SV? how's the ride do you find it better? does it make the rear end smother I am interested to find out.

post #23 of 39

I found this thread becaues I was looking for a solution to replace the Fox ALPS 5R shock on my 1998 Super V2000. It appears that these are REALLY hard to come by (including parts) and they are all starting to fail now. Mine has served me well, until last week when I discovered that it would no longer hold pressure. After close inspection, I found the culprint to be a hairline fracture in the shaft. BUT - I found a Cane Creek Cloud 9 for a reasonable price and it was available in the right size. I ordered it and am hopeful that it will work. Much to my chagrin, at the same time, my Fatty SL Headshock was seized. I fixed it with WD-40 and a 5 lb friendly persuader (sledge hammer). Now it works. I think there was some rust that was binding it up. It's all greased, but I still think I'll take it to the local shop for inspection.

 

So to add my homage to the great Cannondale Super V, I have a couple of pictures. I will post one of the complete bike once I get it back together.

V2000_11.JPG

Sadly, Cannondales are no longer "HANDMADE IN USA," but in Asia. This will be the Last C'dale I ever buy.

 

V2000_15.JPG

 

 

V2000_01.JPG

post #24 of 39
Thread Starter 

As an update:

 

I managed to track down a functioning Alps 4 on MTBR and got it mounted up as soon as it came. Hubby bought me matching pink paddle grips for just that last little touch of girlie-girl on a bad-ass bike. Her shake down ride resulted in having to tighten the rear quick release (twice), the front quick release, the saddle clamp, the seatpost clamp, and the headset (also twice). Other than that, it was a GREAT ride! Admittedly, she climbs harder than my 29er, but the descents were just ripping. I'm even pleased with her 33 lb ride weight, especially since I made no attempt at weight savings during the build. Rather, I was going for a rugged and light lift-served downhill-duty build. biggrin.gif

 

 

 

Here she is (now dubbed True Love), enjoying our ride:

DSCF3527.JPG

 

DSCF3528.JPG

 

DSCF3529.JPG

post #25 of 39

Found this thread whilst doing a google search for an Alps 4 rear shock.

 

Those are some nice Super-V's!  Mine is a '96 Super-V, red, with headshok. 

 

Did the Cane Creek Cloud 9 work out? I need to find a replacement asap, that's not going to cost an arm and a leg!

 

I would also love to upgrade to disc brakes, I do not have the caliper mount tabs on the drop arm.  I'll have to check, but I think my headshok has the tabs up front. If I understand your earlier post, I can source a rear arm from a '99, and that will allow me to upgrade?

 

Can you recommend a source or brand/style of caliper/discs, and I presume either complete rims with disc mount hubs, or hubs to replace mine. 

 

Thanks for any advice you can give!

 

Hussein

post #26 of 39

Found a used Alps5 on eBay.

 

Also figured out that Avid Juicy 7's (on new Mavic wheels)  would fit if I fabricated hanger brackets off the front fork & rear swingarm,

had to fab the IS mount for the front 180mm rotor.

 

SuperVdiscConversion0001.jpg

The bike is close enough Red color to my X1/9 -  I used a can of spray paint to reshoot the fork.biggrin.gif

 

SuperVdiscConversion0007.jpg

post #27 of 39

Hey, I dropped past this thread again over 2 years later and thought I might update...

My Super V is finally moving forward. I've managed to get the shock rebuilt by a guy who no longer seems to be doing it, on eBay...when this shock goes again I think I'll just go with a Risse Terminator or something from Cane Creek.

The bottom bracket and crank is from Profile Racing, and the sweet pedals are these Wellgo pedals in silver. The shifter is a Sram 8-speed gripshift, no front derailleur. The shifter cables and hydraulic brake lines are all braided stainless. The brakes are Magura rim brakes, currently being wire-brushed to match the frame. The dual-bar design does have a purpose other than to look completely WTF, the narrower lower bar will hold clear grips, the shifter and occasional small shopping bags, leaving the upper bar free for clear grips and shiny aluminum brake levers.

 

I've learned to love and trust the Magura hydraulics, and they work extremely well with the Mavic ceramic-coated rims. They are a monster to mount, adjust, and bleed, but once they are correct they are absolutely solid. They never seem to go out of adjustment and they never break. They do require hose clamps if you want to use the cable-mounts that are built onto the Super V frame.

1000

I hope you are all well and happy with your piles of gorgeous Super Vs!

I'll post again when the thing is ready to roll. Cheers!

post #28 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by volklgirl View Post

I demoed a Raven and loved the ride but couldn't stand the funky, hollow sound it made, so I opted out. I still think it's a think of beauty though.

 

Yes, eldest son is treating the bike as he should. He rides it hard but never puts it away wet . In fact, he was the one that doled out for the Lefty on it. He was also the one that did the polishing job on his wife's to make it look sooooo stunning.

 

I2I on the current shock is 5.25" but that frame/swingarm combination will take up to 5.75" if need be.

 

Oh, and I LOVE the number of SPIN rims that are showing up on this thread !!

 

"frame/swingarm combination will take up to 5.75" if need be" , well no i found and installed a rockshox deluxe (from hippietechsuspension for 85$) thats is a 6" and it fits real good with a bit of clearance left in between the swing arm and the frame, 6.5" the swing arm sites on the frame.

post #29 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by v500NYC View Post

 

"frame/swingarm combination will take up to 5.75" if need be" , well no i found and installed a rockshox deluxe (from hippietechsuspension for 85$) thats is a 6" and it fits real good with a bit of clearance left in between the swing arm and the frame, 6.5" the swing arm sites on the frame.

 

post #30 of 39
Thread Starter 

Thanks! That's good to know for when her current Alps finally dies.

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