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Skiing With Progressive Transition Eyeglasses

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 

Anyone do this?

 

I'm asking because I'm now going to be wearing glassed most of the time (can't see poo poo up close and starting to need them for further away ).  I ordered Progressive lenses and got the anti glare coating and transitions.  I sometime ski with just sunglasses and like that (when it's warm enough)

 

I don't need to wear glasses for skiing (prescription for distance is minimal), but when I'm instructing, and have to write things down or check the time, I need my cheaters (for up close I'm +3! )

 

Contacts are out of the question.  I can't even watch my wife put hers in, let alone put them in my own eye .  I'll do lasik or something like that when my eyes finish deteriorating in a few years (60ish) .

 

I have noticed now and again wearing the current pair of progressives I have, that depth perception gets messed up sometimes.  I "see" how that could mess you up walking but not sure it will skiing.

 

Anyway, wondering what the general consensus is on skiing with them .

 

I do have a friend that skis with progressive transitions but that is mainly because he can't even hear without his glasses!  He doesn't ski a lot and he doesn't go fast.  I do the opposite of that.

 

Thanks,

Ken

post #2 of 27

Im in the same boat; 4.25 and i'm only 46. To me it is a more inconvenient not to be able to see things clearly close up while skiing, such as ipod, watch, cell phone and name badges on resort employees. I opted for a pair of single focal glasses that fit neetly under my goggles. Progressives can be tricky if you are changes your focus point from short distance to long, walking down unfarmiliar stairs can, on occasion give me a bit of an uneasy feeling. The Oakley Crowbar goggles seem to work well for me.

 

John

post #3 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:

Originally Posted by temeculajohn View Post

 

To me it is a more inconvenient not to be able to see things clearly close up while skiing, such as ipod, watch, cell phone and name badges on resort employees. I opted for a pair of single focal glasses that fit neetly under my goggles.

 

Ditto.  Couldn't see all the things you mentioned.  Accidently answered a call from work in the lodge once because I couldn't see the numbers (glasses were in transpack).  I did play with wearing glasses under goggles but that never really worked for me.

 

My daughter has gotten used to being my second set of eyes "Honey, what time is it (showing her my watch)?" or "How much us the bill?"


Progressives can be tricky if you are changes your focus point from short distance to long, walking down unfarmiliar stairs can, on occasion give me a bit of an uneasy feeling.

 

I have noticed this.  Sometimes the ground looks like its further away which is odd.  I always thought it was because when asked what frames I wanted by the Optometrist, I said "The ones that make me taller and sexier."  Guess I should have finished that sentence with "...to other people." 

 

The Oakley Crowbar goggles seem to work well for me.

 

I've never been able to get glasses under my Crowbars.  I even tried modifying some cheap ones. 

post #4 of 27

Don't sweat it, you'll adapt. You shouldn't be looking down at your skis anyway, look ahead. Learn to feel the snow with your feet and you won't have to look at the snow.

post #5 of 27

Transitions get REALLY dark at higher altitudes (more UV), so if you're going west be prepared that they'll be really, really, really (yes really) dark, and somewhat unusable on anything but uber-bright days.

 

Glasses for skiing are a non starter for me (-3.50L, -2.75R) due to fogging and lack of visual acquity compared to lenses. Sac up for lenses - you'll be really glad you did

post #6 of 27



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post

Anyone do this?

 

I'm asking because I'm now going to be wearing glassed most of the time (can't see poo poo up close and starting to need them for further away ).  I ordered Progressive lenses and got the anti glare coating and transitions.  I sometime ski with just sunglasses and like that (when it's warm enough)

 

I don't need to wear glasses for skiing (prescription for distance is minimal), but when I'm instructing, and have to write things down or check the time, I need my cheaters (for up close I'm +3! )

 

Contacts are out of the question.  I can't even watch my wife put hers in, let alone put them in my own eye .  I'll do lasik or something like that when my eyes finish deteriorating in a few years (60ish) .

 

I have noticed now and again wearing the current pair of progressives I have, that depth perception gets messed up sometimes.  I "see" how that could mess you up walking but not sure it will skiing.

 

Anyway, wondering what the general consensus is on skiing with them .

 

I do have a friend that skis with progressive transitions but that is mainly because he can't even hear without his glasses!  He doesn't ski a lot and he doesn't go fast.  I do the opposite of that.

 

Thanks,

Ken


Transitions glass is excellent.    I wear transition + Bi-focal glass for nearly 5 years.    I can read piste maps without removing by goggle.   

 

Get a clear len goggle for using in rainy/overcast days.

post #7 of 27

Gotta say I wear progressive lens glasses with no real problems... but I've been using them for the last 4 years so I've got used to the slight distortion to my peripheral vision when looking down.  I use Smith OTG's when skiing and only occasionally get a fogging issue...  Tried using transitions once and hated it - totally agree with the comment above...they get very dark!

 

I have been wearing glasses for a looooong time (for distance).... and at around 50 noticed that my near vision was also not so good - didn't like the idea of carrying around 2 pairs of glasses hence the progressives.

 

Interested in the OP's comment about Lasik tho....I always thought this was not an option because the lens is not so flexible after a certain age.... so Laser treatment would not be an option... maybe some advances in surgery I'm not aware of? 

post #8 of 27

I wear progressives as backup glasses and couldn't imagine skiing with them, even walking down a flight of stairs is weird with them for me.

 

Contacts are the way to go, took me a few weeks to get used to them, but I love them - particularly for skiing.  I have monovision setup, so my left eye is my distance eye and my right eye has more magnification for close-up.

 

Sounds odd, but it works, the brain goes to the eye it needs to, so when I'm skiing I can see distance great and when I look down at my watch, or a trail map I can read great.

post #9 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alen View Post
Interested in the OP's comment about Lasik tho....I always thought this was not an option because the lens is not so flexible after a certain age.... so Laser treatment would not be an option... maybe some advances in surgery I'm not aware of? 



I don't know that the surgery can be done then typically, but I do know people that have done it in their late 50's.  I based waiting until 60 on according to what I've read, my eyes are going to keep deteriorating until then.  No sense in having the surgery until they bottom out .  I have ten years to figure it out.

post #10 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:

Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post

Contacts are the way to go, took me a few weeks to get used to them, but I love them - particularly for skiing.  I have monovision setup, so my left eye is my distance eye and my right eye has more magnification for close-up.

 

Visine is my kryptonite!  As in I can't even put drops in my eyes without assistance; I'll never get a contact in there.  When I was in the Marines I used to joke that if I ever became a POW, my captors would only have to whip out a bottle a Visine and I'd tell them whatever the want to know.

 

Sounds odd, but it works, the brain goes to the eye it needs to, so when I'm skiing I can see distance great and when I look down at my watch, or a trail map I can read great.

 

I know a few folks that have done this with laser surgery and they said that to make sure they were candidates for doing the surgery, they did contacts that way.  Maybe some day when I'm not such a baby  about it I'll do contacts.  I'm taking one more swing at the bat with progressives (last pair weren't aligned right) and if that doesn't work, I might go back to ask about contacts.


So it sounds like the consensus is Transitions will get too dark.

 

Thanks everyone. 
 

post #11 of 27

If you're going to stay in NH you have a shot of making transitions work, out west - not a chance.

 


I was a little dubious abut lenses at fist, but after the second or third time there was no problem whatsoever. Go to a good ophthalmologist and they'll help you out. I'd never ski without my lenses.

post #12 of 27

I have the opposite problem....I can see reasonably well, though not perfectly, at reading distance, but really need glasses for distance.  I have progressives for everyday use, but have a pair of single-lens distance glasses for sports.  I rely heavily on the turbo fan goggles, though.  If I overdress, I fog up anyhow (maybe because I tele, and work pretty hard when i ski....)  I also have distance-only sunglasses for those warm days.

 

I think if I were in your shoes, I would carry reading glasses in a pocket, but enjoy the freedom of skiing without glasses.

 

I have had progressives for about 10 years, and an still not entirely comfortable going down stairs with them, so I don't use them for , skiing, either.

post #13 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by snofun3 View Post

If you're going to stay in NH you have a shot of making transitions work, out west - not a chance.

 


I was a little dubious abut lenses at fist, but after the second or third time there was no problem whatsoever. Go to a good ophthalmologist and they'll help you out. I'd never ski without my lenses.


When you say "lenses" you mean contact lenses right?  Maybe I'll see if I can get one in my right eye and let me left eye(better eye) be the distance one.
 

 

The mountain I teach at just over 2000' (above sea level) at the summit so maybe the transitions will work.

post #14 of 27

Yes, I mean contact lenses.

 

After a couple of times it's really no big deal at all. Take a deep breath, open your eye wide and it'll slip right in.

 

And it's unclear which eye will be the dominant one when going for monovision.

post #15 of 27
Thread Starter 

OK.  My biggest challenge is still going to  be getting the contact "IN" my eye.

post #16 of 27

I wear progressives. The adjustment period sucked. I'm convinced that that I suffered some minor injuries the first 2 ski seasons because of them. I fell in snow conditions that I did not see that normally would not have surprised me. I also play racquetball and golf. Not seeing things in peripheral vision in focus is damn annoying. Life sucks when you get old, but it's still better than the alternative. If your distance vision is ok, you might want to consider granny glasses (1/2 lenses) or plain bifocals with the line. My eyes were bad enough that having the correction available for all distances made the progressives worth it, despite the annoying adjustment period. If you're still unsure, try different solutions. I have a pair of distance only sunglasses for driving. It was worth the investment to know that that solution wasn't going to work for everyday use. Transition technology keeps getting better and better, but I've chosen to keep that tech out of my glasses for cost reasons. I do have a transition lens for my OTG ski goggles.

post #17 of 27

I wear progressives most of the time.  I cannot play golf with them on - well, to be fair, I don't play very well any other way, either.   Had to have a cheap pair made with just my distance prescription to use for golf.

 

For skiing I have prescription goggle inserts made for my distance prescription only.  The only downside is I can't read things like trail maps or fix something without getting out my progressives.

post #18 of 27
Thread Starter 

OK.  So I have my glasses and they are way better than the last pair and I wear them quite a bit already.  As for the transition part, I don't think it would be a problem around here.  Granted it isn't as bright as it would be on  a snow covered mountain but it's been bright.

 

The progressive part wouldn't make skiing impossible for me but it would make it a challenge.  I can see already that the loss of peripheral vision would drive me bonkers. I don't need them for distance and only want them for reading (as an instructor I do have to do that on the mountain).  I brought a pair of cheaters with me last year and that was sort of annoying.

 

So, I think I'm going to suck it up and try contact lenses.   I'll probably have to join a support group .  Think I'll just get one in one eye for up close work and call it a day.  Hopefully it can stay in there a long time.

 

Has anyone doing this (one eye for distance and one for up close) noticed any depth perception issues?  If you need both eyes for depth perception and neither eye can focus on what the other can, does depth perception still work?

 

Thanks,

Ken

post #19 of 27

If you are a strong candidate just go pony up for the lasik.  Keep a pair of readers in a pocket and wear them down on your nose for class.

 

I did.

 

The true story ... had LASER in the right and it was botched ... so I have a contact in the left.

 

I have some "asymetric" dialed in and if mild it's not too bad.  But, if your eyes are bad enough it's pretty academic.  I would go with straight up reading and lasik. 
 

At 60 ... so what?  In ten years get a different pair of readers.

 

I don't know about lasik .. laser they take the (shave) the whole outer lens off ... and when snow hits it (goggles fog or freeze), feels like needles hitting.  Lasik leaves a flap I think so it probably does not have that effect.

post #20 of 27

I do the monovision thing and have no problem with depth perception.

 

Like anything else there's an adjustment period to contacts.  I remember when I first got them I COULD NOT get them in my eyes.  It was unbelievably frustrating.  With time it became really easy.  Now I can do it without a mirror if I need to.

 

My distance vision is adjusted in both eyes (astygmatism) I have more magnification in the right eye then the left. 

 

I ended up having distance glasses made that I wear over the contacts when I want to see really sharp at distance.  Without them I can see fine, but with them things like leaves on trees are sharper and road signs while driving are clearer at a distance.  I love them.  Most of the day I live with my vision being a bit more optimized for close up, and for skiing the contacts are fine.  But I usually drive with the distance glasses, or if I'm hiking or doing something else where I want to see sharper at distance I wear them.  (They're minus numbers, the opposite of reading glasses, and in my case stronger minus on the right eye to equalize the eyes.)

post #21 of 27

Oh, I tried the progressives and they got mad because they said money back.  I too felt like I was bumping into stuff, the dashboard was annoying trying to always cock your head to get the right focal point.

post #22 of 27

I had Lasik with the flap 11 years ago when I was 47.  I was 20/400 and used progressives for reading.  (Minor correction of 1 to 1.5 for reading.)  Afterward I did not need distance lenses but used granny glasses to read.  My eyes are still in great shape 10 years later.

 

Before the Lasik I skied with the progressives and had no problems at all.

 

I have a pair of transitions with lined bifocals for work.  I use them on sunny days so I can inspect then look down and take notes.

 

Skiing and having the wind in my face does not bother my eyes when using goggles or wrap around sunglasses.

 

I'm not a fan of contacts.  I've known too many people that have had problems with them.  Then too, I know people that swear by them.

 

So, get all the info you can, then make your own informed decision.

post #23 of 27

Have used progressive bifocals for about 10 years.  Picked up the 1st pair in the morning and caught an airplane cross country at noon.  No issues, nobody told me I was supposed to have them  .  Know that others have different stories; the wife is one of them.

 

Have a theory on progressive lenses.  People who look down while walking or doing steps, have a problem; people who look out, not so much.  If you see your tips skiing, you could have issues with them.  If you just hear them occasionally, you will probably adapt well to progressives. 

post #24 of 27

I tried progressives this summer and had to return them. There was a tiny spot where I could read if I held the book low and to the left. Distance viewing was fuzzy at the top edge of the lens. Peripheral vision was distorted. I feel like they must have made (and then remade) the lenses wrong, because if peripherals are as bad as mine were I can't imagine anyone would by them. I ended up going back to single-prescription (1.75) reading glasses, and having to put them on to read the trail map.  Perhaps a pocket magnifier would help instead and be easier to fish out of a pocket than glasses?

post #25 of 27

My 2 cents. I've worn glasses from the age of 10 (Wow! you can see the individual leaves on the trees!) I need to have glasses to find my glasses. It seems that it always takes some time (week or two at the most)  for the brain to adjust to the new specs. I remember once as a teen coming up short when I tried to get on my motorcycle with brand new prescription.   The switch to bi-focals played havoc with my golf game. Any head movement in the swing made the ball appear to move. Tough enough game with the ball standing still. Always, after a period of adjustment, the eyes learned to move a bit more for peripheral and the brain accommodated movement and depth perception issues. Read once where a study was done with glasses that inverted the image to the wearer. After 2 weeks, the brain made the switch and without the test specs, everything appeared upside down.

post #26 of 27

I have been wearing progressives for too many years to admit.  I wear them for skiing, golfing and everything else.  Getting used to them can be a adjustment and some people never get used to it.  I love mine.  They have really come a long way with the progressive technology.  I am currently wearing the Autograph II and they have a greatly expanded field of vision.  They are ridiculously expensive but work really well. 

post #27 of 27

I have been wearing progressives for about 20 yrs now the first year or two were kind of tough to get used to them, no problem now. I wore transistions also for many years but have given them up for clear lens glasses and progressive sunglasses now.

Fog on lenses on any type of glasses when worn inside goggles is still the main problem for me.

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