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Hardtail or Full Suspension MB's - Page 2

post #31 of 42


Post of the day! 
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

My advice is:

 

IGNORE everything in this thread, find some riding 'friends', find out what they ride where they ride and why and do that.

 

we don't have anywhere near enough info to make a reasonable suggestion for you, all this 'advice' is really "I like ___ so should you."



With that said-get a Steel HT with SLX and a Fox fork.  

post #32 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

My advice is:

 

IGNORE everything in this thread, find some riding 'friends', find out what they ride where they ride and why and do that.

 

we don't have anywhere near enough info to make a reasonable suggestion for you, all this 'advice' is really "I like ___ so should you."



but then he'll be getting their version of  "I like ___ so should you." 

post #33 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

My advice is:

 

IGNORE everything in this thread, find some riding 'friends', find out what they ride where they ride and why and do that.

 

we don't have anywhere near enough info to make a reasonable suggestion for you, all this 'advice' is really "I like ___ so should you."

 

Actually, barring specific info to the contrary, it's pretty clear that the average experience of mountain biking is better on a FS bike, and that used FS bikes are available in his price range.  The problem with riding friends is they may have idiosyncratic tastes, and/or be into just one type of riding.  A DJ hardtail is nearly as versatile as a 29'er hardtail, e.g., but both types of hardtail are extremely limiting for a number of types of riding, though well-suited to some specific uses.  If the op is pretty sure he mainly wants to bike on fairly buff surfaces, or otherwise qualifies things, then average experience of course is out the window.  But, you can ride buff singetrack on a used FS bike and have a great time, even if it's not setup for XC.  It doesn't work the other way around.
 

post #34 of 42

The most important thing about a bike is how it fits. Make sure you take it for a test ride (on a real trail) and make sure it is comfy for both climbing and descending.

 

Its worth noting that in addition to the bike you will need / want to have the following accessory items: helmet, gloves, padded bike short and jersey, tire change kit, spare tubes, bottle, cage, and bolt on grips. And they will cost about $200-300 all together. And you may want to consider getting some clipless pedals and shoes after your first year of riding. So if you have only $1000 to spare, spend 800 on the bike and the remainder on accessories.

 

As far as what bike... MTB has three main categories of riding: XC, freeride, and All Mountain. XC riding is longer rides with lots of pedalling often there will be lots of climbing and descending and often some technical terrain. The focus is on riding fast and efficiently. Freeride is often gravity riding but also includes stuff like dirt jumps and park riding that focuses on getting air, extreme technical challenge, and stunts. Do you swing both ways and like to keep your options open? AM riding is a mix of both. The focus is on variety and not being locked into one type of riding all the time, you might do a long pedally XC ride one day and then hits the park or jumps the next.

 

You should think about what category of riding appeals to you and then buy a bike that will let you explore that. It won't be much fun to ride XC on a FR bike, nor is the XC bike going to work well for freeriding. AM bikes are sort of in the middle and compromise alot on both ends until you get into the very pricey top of the line FS rides.

 

You can get Hardtail versions of each type of bike for under 1000 so it up to you what you want. Introductory FS version of each type are also available from most big Mfgs for around $1500.

 

As far as the pros / cons of FS vs HT. HT most people think are harder to ride well and thus are better bikes to learn on since they give more feedback. You will know when you cleaned that section. But they can be harsh teachers and until you master the manoeuvre you might end up looking the fool. FS are more forgiving of errors, make riding more technical trails easier, they also tend to be more comfortable for long rides in the saddle and might give you a feeling more confident with a sense of accomplishment sooner. 


Edited by tromano - 7/9/10 at 9:16pm
post #35 of 42
Thread Starter 

Wow everyone, thanks for the advice.

 

It seems like my best bet is to just demo a bunch of bikes and see what is most suitable for me. Thanks for all the help once again.

post #36 of 42

Ooooooo, look what Finndog posted 

Trek Fuel 98 (2001) FS bike L frame

 

This would be a great bike for a first time bike purchase, and Finndog's stuff is usually like new!

post #37 of 42

if you can fit finndog's bike by it. 

post #38 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post

if you can fit finndog's bike buy it. 


I agree, and his stuff is immaculate.

Check with him to see how long he's at the 'Boat with his bike before he takes it back to the east coast.

post #39 of 42

  Even that little bit of travel in the rear suspension will make a big difference, particularly if you get it tuned.  "Tuning" your suspension may sound intimidating but with a little googling is pretty straightforward at a basic level.

 

Also, you should note that a HT in fact is not the best to learn on if you will ride a lot of uneven terrain, as the tendency is to build lots of bad habits.  What you want for mountain biking is a forward, athletic riding position, and long story short it's much easier to stay in this position on a fs bike if the terrain is at all rough, including for XC rides. 

post #40 of 42

thanks BWPA and Trek!  I took the Fuel for a ride that I know BWPA would have loved yesterday, we headed up a ride called "Spring Creek", sounds so nice and sweet.. its a beautiful ride of aobut 6 miles out and back, its just that it's pretty much a 6 mile uphill and a sweet and fast 6 miles down hill....  the bike rocked, it climbed very well. I really liked the bike very much,, not so sure I need a new bike.  Heading over to a shop today tht sells Ibis, Giant and Santa Cruz, they may be selling off their demos.  Also, Greg had a great idea, I am going over to the Moots HQ to see thier stuff, I don't think there's any bargains to be had but you never know and i think it will be cool to see their shop.  heres a picture on the trail (Jon Wade, my friend is pictured)

 

005.JPG

post #41 of 42


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post

thanks BWPA and Trek!  I took the Fuel for a ride that I know BWPA would have loved yesterday, we headed up a ride called "Spring Creek", sounds so nice and sweet.. its a beautiful ride of aobut 6 miles out and back, its just that it's pretty much a 6 mile uphill and a sweet and fast 6 miles down hill....  the bike rocked, it climbed very well. I really liked the bike very much,, not so sure I need a new bike.  Heading over to a shop today tht sells Ibis, Giant and Santa Cruz, they may be selling off their demos.  Also, Greg had a great idea, I am going over to the Moots HQ to see thier stuff, I don't think there's any bargains to be had but you never know and i think it will be cool to see their shop.  heres a picture on the trail (Jon Wade, my friend is pictured)

 

005.JPG

 

 

the irony is the Giant or Ibis FS will pedal much better than a Moots. Now if i was getting a hardtail with unlimited amount of money a moots would be the way to go.

 

Short list for cheaper but better than anything else bike.

 

Giant Trance X just make sure the fit is right and the stem is some retarded 110mm plus job!
 

post #42 of 42

BWPA, you crack me up!  Yes,  I will make sure it has the right stem!! 

 

 

Giant trance is a really nice ride. Jon rides a trance XO.

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