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Hardtail or Full Suspension MB's

post #1 of 42
Thread Starter 

I'm just getting into mountain biking and am wondering, when I finally take the plunge to buy a bike, whether a full suspension or hard tail is right for me. Mainly, what are the differences, pro's and con's of each bike?

 

Does anyone have any recommendations - any bike around the $1000 mark, give or take 3 or 4 hundred dollars, would be preferable. But ultimately, quality is all I really care about.


Edited by Huckle - 7/4/10 at 7:19pm
post #2 of 42

Much depends on where/how you plan to ride off-road.

 

For rolling to steep, fairly smooth single track, a hardtail 26" or 29" will almost always be faster and lighter. You'll also get better components for the same price and you'll have less maintenance to deal with.

 

For aggressive all-mountain riding, full suspension is the way to go for many people. The suspension will smooth out the ride and may give you added confidence in the gnarly stuff.

 

Really, the best suggestion (just like skis) is to demo a bunch of different styles, makes, and models to find the ride that best fits your body type and riding style. Developing a good relationship with your local bike shop is also a very good idea for maintenance and upgrade issues down the road.

 

I have a stable of bikes with each having their own purpose and personality (29er hardtail for daily riding, 26" singlespeed conversion for when I'm feeling frisky, full suspension for stupid crap and when I don't know what to expect when traveling, and a road bike for, well, gathering dust). I find that Cannondales fit my body type and riding style best and I love their Hand Made in the USA quality (although that may change, unfortunately ). I've ridden LOTS of other stuff over the years and only the Redline Monocog Flight and the Gary Fisher Superfly gave me the same grin factor.

post #3 of 42

At your price-point you'll be hard pressed to find a decent FS, unless you go second hand; however, there are plenty of decent HT bike for around $1k.  Get the best frame you can afford and upgrade the components as you break them.

post #4 of 42
Thread Starter 

Awesome, thanks for the recommendations.

post #5 of 42

For this money, there's only HT as option. Decent FS bikes start at twice this much. And in my opinion, it's better to have good HT then crappy FS. Well for myself, I always choose good HT over good FS, but that's just me :)

post #6 of 42

The trick is finding the right bike for your geometry, riding style and terrain of choice.

Philpug recently posted some of his demo experience, which proved to be eye opening and led him to getting juuuust the right bike.

IIRC you can read from this post on to see a bit of it.

 

http://www.epicski.com/forum/thread/83922/the-official-random-mtb-stoke-thread/150#post_1230124

post #7 of 42

for the price hardtail is your only real option.

 

FS do alot of things better, overall I am faster on FS bike, but unless you get really lucky finding even a decent FS for a 1000 bucks will be really hard.

 

I havent ridden this but I have -one of their Steel 26er SS frame. IF they have size to fit you and you want simple and slightly harder work in the form of a SS it could be a steal for you.

 

http://www.jensonusa.com/store/product/BI272F00-Jamis+Dragon+One+Bike+09.aspx

 

Check out the local bike shops as well but msot likely none can match the prices you can find online. This is assuming your going to do your own work, if you cant, than go to the LBS.

 

Also budget an extra 100 buck for - lock on grips, normal grip will eventually twist on you no matter what especially if you ride in rain. part of that 100 bucks should go to converting your tires to tubeless. The only downside to tubeless is setup is they can be harder to setup. Upsides are faster, more control, lighter, and less to no flats. Anyone who doesnt run one IMO is not the sharpest tool in the shed.

 

post #8 of 42

Keep your eyes open, I just managed to get Old Boot a Mongoose Teocali Elite for his first bike,  he likes my Trek Liquid 65 best of all he tried, so I wanted something that would have the travel and a similar feel (without all the weight), so i can use his when he isn't.  Anyhow, i managed to get this for $1170.00 at Performance Bicycle and if you click the link I inserted today, you'll see it's on for 1399.00 - 15% today for $1190.00 regular $2000.00, for the 2009 right now, but small and xlarge are all that is left.  The 15% is only good for one more day (today), but they often have some amount off on certain items each week.  Small on the Mongoose models is as 17" frame and old boot ended up fitting their small best.  It has a slightly shorter wheel base and top frame making the bike still fit well, sitting a little taller then other smalls. So try out a mongoose in the shop first for sizing. 

I was able to try this out at the local Performance bike store, order it on line, have it shipped to them and they put it together for no charge.  It has a very good quality build for the dollars, and met Old Boots needs well, he won't be an aggressive full time rider with me, but it will certainly carry him fine if he decides to suddenly start coming along full time.  So keep your eyes open if you have time and patience and you will have every possibility of finding a bike in your price range that will meet your needs.

 

Again the link to this actual bike is:  http://www.performancebike.com/bikes//CatalogSearchResultView?storeId=10052&catalogId=10551&langId=-1&pageSize=16&beginIndex=0&sortBy=Dollar+Rank%2F%2F1&searchType=resultSet&cn1=&searchTerm=mongoose+teocali+elite

post #9 of 42



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post

for the price hardtail is your only real option.

 

FS do alot of things better, overall I am faster on FS bike, but unless you get really lucky finding even a decent FS for a 1000 bucks will be really hard.

 

I havent ridden this but I have -one of their Steel 26er SS frame. IF they have size to fit you and you want simple and slightly harder work in the form of a SS it could be a steal for you.

 

http://www.jensonusa.com/store/product/BI272F00-Jamis+Dragon+One+Bike+09.aspx

 

Check out the local bike shops as well but msot likely none can match the prices you can find online. This is assuming your going to do your own work, if you cant, than go to the LBS.

 

Also budget an extra 100 buck for - lock on grips, normal grip will eventually twist on you no matter what especially if you ride in rain. part of that 100 bucks should go to converting your tires to tubeless. The only downside to tubeless is setup is they can be harder to setup. Upsides are faster, more control, lighter, and less to no flats. Anyone who doesnt run one IMO is not the sharpest tool in the shed.

 



bush, as usual you let your own particular preferences dictate your mouth....

you're a regular marketing tool.....based on ALL your year of cycling, no doubt.....

 

The OP said he was just getting into mtb'n. And you talk of SINGLE SPEED? wtf?

lock on grips? why? just glue on a pair of grips and get on with it.

Tubeless? he won't need them or the expensive, carry a tube, big deal!

 

Keeping things simple and inexpenise will be a better into. Learning to do basic maintanence, repairs and flat repair will only help in the long run.

 

Hartail all the way

As stated, buy the best frame you can afford and components can be upgraded as  budget and cycling needs dictate... most importantly, get out there and find what you like and have FUN

post #10 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

The trick is finding the right bike for your geometry, riding style and terrain of choice.

Philpug recently posted some of his demo experience, which proved to be eye opening and led him to getting juuuust the right bike.

IIRC you can read from this post on to see a bit of it.

 

http://www.epicski.com/forum/thread/83922/the-official-random-mtb-stoke-thread/150#post_1230124

To add to this, I took my nephew demoing earlier this summer.

He had a 1000.00 budget for his entry level bike.

I explained to him like I will to you:

You can get an entry level bike for $500 ish, but you'll be replacing it in a year  if you do much riding at all.

Spending the extra $500 will get you a lot better frame(as Rossi Smash suggested) then you can improve on that as you desire.

 

For my nephew, he demoed several bikes(lost count) with no preconceived idea in mind.

Some of those he demo'd were HT 26, some were HT29ers, one was FS.

In the final choice, he had it narrowed down to a Cannondale(26) and a Fischer (29er).  I swear he went back and forth trying those bikes for over an hour, riding them, on the trail, over the RRX, in the parking lot, over the curb stops........(yada yada)

In the end he picked the Fischer Genesis2(29er).

I demo'd that bike and didn't feel right on it, but he LOVES it.

 

There are a lot of good choices out there, find whats best for you and to quote Rossi Smash

 


 

Quote:
As stated, but the best frame you can afford and components can be upgraded as  budget and cycling needs dictate... most importantly, get out there and find what you like and have FUN

 

 

For reference, here is my nephew on his bike in the yard after we bought it.  The smile says it all, eh!

28204_10150197279750018_830505017_12395425_992648_n.jpg

 

And Lil Ava was totally  on this Trek but the geometry didn't work for me so I passed on it.

28204_10150197231200018_830505017_12394171_4596880_n.jpg

post #11 of 42

Does anyone still use 26" hardtails?

 

Really?

post #12 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossi Smash View Post



 



bush, as usual you let your own particular preferences dictate your mouth....

you're a regular marketing tool.....based on ALL your year of cycling, no doubt.....

 

The OP said he was just getting into mtb'n. And you talk of SINGLE SPEED? wtf?

lock on grips? why? just glue on a pair of grips and get on with it.

Tubeless? he won't need them or the expensive, carry a tube, big deal!

 

Keeping things simple and inexpenise will be a better into. Learning to do basic maintanence, repairs and flat repair will only help in the long run.

 

Hartail all the way

As stated, buy the best frame you can afford and components can be upgraded as  budget and cycling needs dictate... most importantly, get out there and find what you like and have FUN


lockon grips in the long run are cheaper everytime you need to do work on a bike brakes/shifters/new handlebars wahtever they bolt on and off, not to mention non lockons are a pain in the ass to work with require compressed air to get them on with glue, and even then WILL still slip when it gets wet out! There is not a single person here who has never had a non lockon grip not slip on them, they all slip eventually and makes you a worse rider.

 

tubeless tire require about 25 bucks and an hour of time to set up. Its one of the few things that will actually make the person a better rider.  I use to flat every ride with tubes or bounce on controllably down the trail neither was fun. With tubeless under 25 psi and never flat, by never flat I have 1800 miles on my MTBs this year with out a single flat. There is noone out there with tubes that has 1800 miles without flats or if they do they are running to high of pressure.

 

Comfort, reliability, safety, and lower rolling resitence for less than 30 bucks. You dont need special tubeless wheel or tubeless tires you just need to make rim strip and have sealant.

 

I still carry a tube because well its not a 100 percent but I have givne it out more than using myself. tubeless isnt a pass to not carry stuff to fix a flat it just makes it so you almost never have to do it.

 

SS - the guy is in kansas plus you can gear it down. Kansas should be flattish and gear can complicate things for newbies. The main reason for picking a SS is because overall you get nicer stuff(steel frame, nice fork, nice wheelset, and crankset) for less money. Like you said keep it simple. SS dont break as much geared bike nor are as hard or expensive to repair. 

 

yeah I am inexperinced but I am the fastest person of my inexperince I have met. I have  I have had top 3s in Cat 1 MTB won a couple Cat 2 MTB series, top 5 in Cat 1/2 CX races and usually place top 5 in 4/5 road races.  So whatever because I am willing to adapt just alittle at home DIY in tubeless and am annoyed by grips that spins and get ruined when you need replace a broken brake lever you can hate me.

 

I hate bikes that break or dont work right and choose stuff that doesnt brake or let me down. The problem with most sub 1000 dollars hardtails(new) is that gruppo kinda of suck and sets the new rider up for frustrating dealing with stuff that doesnt work right when its brand new let alone when its get bent up and beat up riding it. SS cant have this happen to them. 

 

So the guy ask for advice, I give it and then your the first to critise me because I am young brash and might actually have clue to of what I am talking about and am actually all for KISS.

post #13 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post

Does anyone still use 26" hardtails?

 

Really?

 

I do but 650b wheels are awaiting suitable fork. 

 

They still very much make sense for racers on smooth course, anything else not so much so.
 

post #14 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post

Does anyone still use 26" hardtails?

 

Really?


I still do, and when I will be getting next bike sometime end of this or in worse case end of next season, 26" HT will be only thing I will be looking for. Yeah I know, I'm weird :)

post #15 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post

Does anyone still use 26" hardtails?

 

Really?



Yep....for local single track. Works just fine for what I want. REALLY!

 

Most of my dirt road stuff is done on a CX type bike.

 

post #16 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post




lockon grips in the long run are cheaper everytime you need to do work on a bike brakes/shifters/new handlebars wahtever they bolt on and off, not to mention non lockons are a pain in the ass to work with require compressed air to get them on with glue, and even then WILL still slip when it gets wet out! There is not a single person here who has never had a non lockon grip not slip on them, they all slip eventually and makes you a worse rider.

 

tubeless tire require about 25 bucks and an hour of time to set up. Its one of the few things that will actually make the person a better rider.  I use to flat every ride with tubes or bounce on controllably down the trail neither was fun. With tubeless under 25 psi and never flat, by never flat I have 1800 miles on my MTBs this year with out a single flat. There is noone out there with tubes that has 1800 miles without flats or if they do they are running to high of pressure.

 

Comfort, reliability, safety, and lower rolling resitence for less than 30 bucks. You dont need special tubeless wheel or tubeless tires you just need to make rim strip and have sealant.

 

I still carry a tube because well its not a 100 percent but I have givne it out more than using myself. tubeless isnt a pass to not carry stuff to fix a flat it just makes it so you almost never have to do it.

 

SS - the guy is in kansas plus you can gear it down. Kansas should be flattish and gear can complicate things for newbies. The main reason for picking a SS is because overall you get nicer stuff(steel frame, nice fork, nice wheelset, and crankset) for less money. Like you said keep it simple. SS dont break as much geared bike nor are as hard or expensive to repair. 

 

yeah I am inexperinced but I am the fastest person of my inexperince I have met. I have  I have had top 3s in Cat 1 MTB won a couple Cat 2 MTB series, top 5 in Cat 1/2 CX races and usually place top 5 in 4/5 road races.  So whatever because I am willing to adapt just alittle at home DIY in tubeless and am annoyed by grips that spins and get ruined when you need replace a broken brake lever you can hate me.

 

I hate bikes that break or dont work right and choose stuff that doesnt brake or let me down. The problem with most sub 1000 dollars hardtails(new) is that gruppo kinda of suck and sets the new rider up for frustrating dealing with stuff that doesnt work right when its brand new let alone when its get bent up and beat up riding it. SS cant have this happen to them. 

 

So the guy ask for advice, I give it and then your the first to critise me because I am young brash and might actually have clue to of what I am talking about and am actually all for KISS.



bush...you assume everyone races or even cares about their speed. Many do not. Priorities change once you take that out of the equation.

 

But we can agree that simple is usually a good thing.

post #17 of 42

One factor nobody ever brings up is age.  As you get older your elasticity wanes causing vibrations and jolts to pass through your body more pronounced.  I have two excellent hardtails sitting in my garage that rarely see the light of day because of that (I'm in my 50s.)  Even on simple trails the difference in ride is enough to make me grab a full suspension bike.  I ride with a couple guys in their early 40s and they say the same thing.  One has even given up riding his hardtail on streets (we don't have the smoothests streets around here.)

post #18 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossi Smash View Post





bush...you assume everyone races or even cares about their speed. Many do not. Priorities change once you take that out of the equation.

 

But we can agree that simple is usually a good thing.

 

still even those that didnt race wouldnt want more reliable? or more safety? or easier time pedaling? its arguablly cheaper to run tubeless when you start figuring out how many tubes you actually go though.

 

The only downside is the first time setting it up but Id rather spend an 30-90 minutes in AC setting up a tubeless tire than sweating on the side of  the trail replacing a tubes thats been pinched or thorned. 
 

post #19 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rio View Post

One factor nobody ever brings up is age.  As you get older your elasticity wanes causing vibrations and jolts to pass through your body more pronounced.  I have two excellent hardtails sitting in my garage that rarely see the light of day because of that (I'm in my 50s.)  Even on simple trails the difference in ride is enough to make me grab a full suspension bike.  I ride with a couple guys in their early 40s and they say the same thing.  One has even given up riding his hardtail on streets (we don't have the smoothests streets around here.)


but your FS bike is probably worth much more than a 1000 bucks? wouldnt you say?

 

a 1000 dollar FS new is a very sketchy bike to ride in so many ways.

 

Also AL hardtails are much more harsh than steel(or carbon/ TI but since we are talking 1000 dollars here those are out)

post #20 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post

but your FS bike is probably worth much more than a 1000 bucks? wouldnt you say?

 

a 1000 dollar FS new is a very sketchy bike to ride in so many ways.

 

Also AL hardtails are much more harsh than steel(or carbon/ TI but since we are talking 1000 dollars here those are out)


I would never buy a $1000 full suspension bike.  It will be heavy with low end components.

 

A steel hardtail would be preferred over aluminum but its hard to find a good hardtail with a steel frame these days.

post #21 of 42

Josh, I agree with you about the grips.  And your rationale on the tubeless makes sense to me as well.  I have slipping grips on one of my bikes, and it drives me nuts.

 

Mike

post #22 of 42

After a few days of riding I love my 29, it is a fantastic ride. What a confidence builder it is. I am by far NOT the best rider out there but like a 90mm waisted ski through the crud it smokes most any 75mm ski. Call it a crutch, I don't care it has helped my riding a ton. Finding a demo day as compared to your typical parking lot test was a huge help. I agree with the previous mentioning of tubeless, very well worth it, besides less chance of flats, it takes a lot of weight out. AS fat as going single, maybe if the rider was building a quiver of bikes, but how about a 1x9 or 2x9? I have yet to miss my 3rd chainring on my 2x9  (22/34) set up. FWIX, it was a $100.00 upgrade from Deore to SLX and worth it. The 2x9 gives you 18 gears that I can actually use as compared to the 3x9 where the chain is either too long or short on the big ring. 


Edited by Philpug - 7/5/10 at 9:55am
post #23 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rio View Post

One factor nobody ever brings up is age.  As you get older your elasticity wanes causing vibrations and jolts to pass through your body more pronounced.  I have two excellent hardtails sitting in my garage that rarely see the light of day because of that (I'm in my 50s.)  Even on simple trails the difference in ride is enough to make me grab a full suspension bike.  I ride with a couple guys in their early 40s and they say the same thing.  One has even given up riding his hardtail on streets (we don't have the smoothests streets around here.)


I am in the same boat as Rio.  As an aging mountain biker I enjoy FS for its ability to allow me to still do 3.5 hour rides in relative comfort.  I used to reach the "my ass and back really want to be off this bike" on my hardtail after 3-4 hours, but as I aged that time limit went down.  My legs can still go that long, but now I need the cush of FS for the rest of my bod to comfortably hang with my legs..

post #24 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post

Does anyone still use 26" hardtails?

 

Really?



Sure.  I have two titanium hardtails, a 26 and a 29.  I prefer the 29er, but the difference is not night and day.  If cost was a big issue, I'd look for a bargain in a 26er, from someone with gearhead disease who just had to upgrade.

post #25 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post

for the price hardtail is your only real option.

 

FS do alot of things better, overall I am faster on FS bike, but unless you get really lucky finding even a decent FS for a 1000 bucks will be really hard.

 

I havent ridden this but I have -one of their Steel 26er SS frame. IF they have size to fit you and you want simple and slightly harder work in the form of a SS it could be a steal for you.

 

http://www.jensonusa.com/store/product/BI272F00-Jamis+Dragon+One+Bike+09.aspx

 

Check out the local bike shops as well but msot likely none can match the prices you can find online. This is assuming your going to do your own work, if you cant, than go to the LBS.

 

Also budget an extra 100 buck for - lock on grips, normal grip will eventually twist on you no matter what especially if you ride in rain. part of that 100 bucks should go to converting your tires to tubeless. The only downside to tubeless is setup is they can be harder to setup. Upsides are faster, more control, lighter, and less to no flats. Anyone who doesnt run one IMO is not the sharpest tool in the shed.

 


What he said.

 

But I would add go with the LBS, You pay more, but you get more.
 

post #26 of 42

The question anyone who's getting into mountain biking needs to answer is whether they will primarily ride buff (ie smooth) single track, plus some fireroads or other unpaved roadlike areas, and maybe on the road here or there.  Or, whether they'll put in significant time on rougher offroad surfaces and are willing, when riding on paved to similar surfaces, to work slightly harder than they would on a road bike.

 

What a number of my friends have announced is that they want to mountainbike for general fitness, but don't want to ride trails much, and want a bike that rides pretty much like a road bike so they don't have to work hard-er riding around the neighborhood.  They should at minimum be on hardtails, but more likely an inexpensive cyclocross or freeroading bike, or even a simple cruiser, would be more functional for them if it fit with what they need style-wise.

 

If you actually plan on primarily mountainbiking with your mtb, a fs will be much more versatile for most people.  You can work with your LBS to find one used that's in good shape for what your price range is.  Particularly if you are just starting to develop mtb skills, a FS will make for a much better learning curve, as well as be more fun for actual mountain biking.   You can have great fun on a hardtail, too, but for most people a 6" FS is sort of the new standard for all-around mountain biking.  You can do everything from lift-served riding to long epics on that type of bike. 

post #27 of 42


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by CTKook View Post

The question anyone who's getting into mountain biking needs to answer is whether they will primarily ride buff (ie smooth) single track, plus some fireroads or other unpaved roadlike areas, and maybe on the road here or there.  Or, whether they'll put in significant time on rougher offroad surfaces and are willing, when riding on paved to similar surfaces, to work slightly harder than they would on a road bike.

 

What a number of my friends have announced is that they want to mountainbike for general fitness, but don't want to ride trails much, and want a bike that rides pretty much like a road bike so they don't have to work hard-er riding around the neighborhood.  They should at minimum be on hardtails, but more likely an inexpensive cyclocross or freeroading bike, or even a simple cruiser, would be more functional for them if it fit with what they need style-wise.

 

If you actually plan on primarily mountainbiking with your mtb, a fs will be much more versatile for most people.  You can work with your LBS to find one used that's in good shape for what your price range is.  Particularly if you are just starting to develop mtb skills, a FS will make for a much better learning curve, as well as be more fun for actual mountain biking.   You can have great fun on a hardtail, too, but for most people a 6" FS is sort of the new standard for all-around mountain biking.  You can do everything from lift-served riding to long epics on that type of bike. 


again the guy has 1000 dollars to spend.

 

There is not a single good sub 1000 dollar FS bike out there, there are some used bikes out there but you have to know your size, and realize your buying a used bike.

post #28 of 42


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post


 


again the guy has 1000 dollars to spend.

 

There is not a single good sub 1000 dollar FS bike out there, there are some used bikes out there but you have to know your size, and realize your buying a used bike.

 

He has $700-1400 to spend, according to his post.  He likely has a local bike shop within a reasonable distance from him that can help him find a suitable used FS bikes that isn't trashed or stolen.  If I were in the same boat, I'd probably actually call around to local shops, explain what my riding background (just starting) and general size are in addition to my budget, and see what I can find just by working the phone a bit, with it being clear that a shop that helps me out will get my business for maintenance, etc. down the road.  Such a shop will likely even tune his suspension for him, which in many ways is the most important part of the bike working well for him.

 

Roots, bony singletrack, etc. etc. will just be completely different, and much more fun, on a good FS, if he will be riding (or may want to ride) those types of trails.
 

post #29 of 42

If you're looking for a softer ride than that of a standard hardtail, consider going with a 29er! It won't give you the super cush of a full suspension, but it will give you a softer ride than a 26". While a good full suspension is just out of your price range, a 29er would be well within it. Add a suspension seat post and your back will be happy! For me at least, an added bonus is that the 29er climbs much better than most HTs or FSs.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post

After a few days of riding I love my 29, it is a fantastic ride. What a confidence builder it is. I am by far NOT the best rider out there but like a 90mm waisted ski through the crud it smokes most any 75mm ski. Call it a crutch, I don't care it has helped my riding a ton. Finding a demo day as compared to your typical parking lot test was a huge help. I agree with the previous mentioning of tubeless, very well worth it, besides less chance of flats, it takes a lot of weight out. AS fat as going single, maybe if the rider was building a quiver of bikes, but how about a 1x9 or 2x9? I have yet to miss my 3rd chainring on my 2x9  (22/34) set up. FWIX, it was a $100.00 upgrade from Deore to SLX and worth it. The 2x9 gives you 18 gears that I can actually use as compared to the 3x9 where the chain is either too long or short on the big ring. 

I knew you'd dig riding a 29er! I love how the big wheels and softer tires cushions the ride making my aluminum frame a lot cushier ride than I expected.

 

I went 1x9 on mine and rarely miss the large or small rings. The simplicity of only having to think about shifting with one hand is really nice.
 

post #30 of 42

My advice is:

 

IGNORE everything in this thread, find some riding 'friends', find out what they ride where they ride and why and do that.

 

we don't have anywhere near enough info to make a reasonable suggestion for you, all this 'advice' is really "I like ___ so should you."

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