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Avalanche transceivers- Time to invest? - Page 2

post #31 of 44

  I do this too.  It's being taught in the courses I'm involved with.  I had a unit go bad such that it was sending, but not able to switch to receive.  Fortunately we caught it in a practice session and not in the field.  It's important to check all transceivers in both functions.  The whole party should receive you and not just the last guy.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters View Post

Another "ritual" about making sure your beacon is on:

 

I was taught way back when that at some point before you start into hazardous terrain the party should check to make sure that everyone's beacon is transmitting.  For me, that usually means that I ski to a safe spot about thirty yards away from the rest of the group and turn my transceiver to "receive".  I then have each member of the party ski slowly by me while I watch (and listen) as my Tracker registers them and shows them coming.  They then slow down so I can visually check that my transceiver shows them within a meter of me as they go by.  They then ski 30 yards away from me and then next person skis toward me.  At the end, I have the last person switch theirs to "receive" to make sure mine is transmitting.

 

I know we've "caught" several people over the years by doing that.  That's even after asking if everybody's beacon is on.

 

Can someone who's taken a avy course recently tell me if that is still taught?  I almost never see parties going out the gate at JH doing it.

post #32 of 44
Thread Starter 

I was thinking about the uses for the beacon other than jsut avi danger and addtion to tree-wells, I was thinking it still has value in many of the thick tree sections where you can can separated rather quickly and you can't see very far around (maybe 10'). I would think the beacon could at least give yo an idea where your buds are and if they knock into a tree and can't speak, it would be useful? 

 

Another question. Do you use the beacon even if you are skiing areas that are not avi prone or is this just part of your gear now?

post #33 of 44

The buddy system in trees is a lot more useful than relying on any alternative method of finding someone once there's a problem -- the problem is basically no one practices the buddy system in trees. 

 

A beacon could help you find someone who's knocked cold, say, in the trees, but if you're close enough then they should be pretty easy to find anyway.  And as noted for tree wells if you're not close enough you have problems.

 

Using beacons in areas with no significant slide risk doesn't make sense to me.  But, probably harmless, assuming it's not viewed as an acceptable way to keep track of kids, etc. etc.

post #34 of 44

I believe all avi transceivers max out at 80 meters or less, which makes them pretty useless for keeping track of kids, or other skiers in the trees.  I think the two principal uses remain finding buried avalanche victims, and looking cool in the lift line and lodge.

post #35 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by mudfoot View Post
... looking cool in the lift line....


This is another pet peeve.  1)  Don't put it in your pocket, unless it's your pants pocket, or worse in your pack.  2)   Gunslinger style, to garner maximum liftline views among other things, is even more lame.

 

Edit: not directed at anyone in this thread, just a pet peeve.

post #36 of 44
Thread Starter 



YEah, read my post above, one of my previous reasons for not buying was looking like a poser. I will wear it under the Jacket and not when days where it serves no purpose. It's not a toy.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CTKook View Post




This is another pet peeve.  1)  Don't put it in your pocket, unless it's your pants pocket, or worse in your pack.  2)   Gunslinger style, to garner maximum liftline views among other things, is even more lame.

post #37 of 44
Thread Starter 



We always ski using teh buddy sytem but invariably folks stray, in thick forests of evergreens, it's very easy to loose folks. Searching for ko'd skiers and/or tree-wells is what I was thinking about. BUt you are correct about the tree-wells.  A couple of seasons back I lost track of my nephew (19) in the Morningside area of  Steamboat. He lost his board and couldn't hear me. I was only about 50' in front of him when he went down, I couldn't hear him in the trees, his board slid to the side and down a knoll. He was hip deep in the snow trying to get to it. It would have been useful to at least have an idea of where he was. trying to pole uphill in deep snow is not easy and slow.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CTKook View Post

The buddy system in trees is a lot more useful than relying on any alternative method of finding someone once there's a problem -- the problem is basically no one practices the buddy system in trees. 

 

A beacon could help you find someone who's knocked cold, say, in the trees, but if you're close enough then they should be pretty easy to find anyway.  And as noted for tree wells if you're not close enough you have problems.

 

Using beacons in areas with no significant slide risk doesn't make sense to me.  But, probably harmless, assuming it's not viewed as an acceptable way to keep track of kids, etc. etc.

post #38 of 44

If your transceiver is not securely strapped to your body, there is a good chance the rescuers will find it someplace else when they come looking to dig you up, and if you are the kind of idiot that wears one to look cool, you are probably the type of person who will need it most, based on your misguided decision making skills and priorities.  Ego kills in the backcountry.

post #39 of 44
Thread Starter 

in the holster and as directed. Why would anyone wear it any other way?

post #40 of 44

Pants pocket also works, and can be more convenient in terms of managing layers, particularly on warmer days and/or when you're doing a lot of moving etc. etc. 

 

There are also some people who in terms of experience/task-specific needs, etc.  do deviate from standard practice, and that's cool too, the key is they have the experience base.

post #41 of 44
Thread Starter 

Hmm, I need take a course and master its use first.....

post #42 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post

Hmm, I need take a course and master its use first.....



I see in the next decade skiers wearing one in resorts and never taking it off transmit. Our patrol are indicating they advise you wear one in deep unstable conditions.

post #43 of 44

I have one and wear it occasionally.  I've never worn it out of bounds (except for the North Summit Snowfields at Big Sky, where it is no longer mandatory), but do wear it when conditions are unstable inbounds.

 

I'll admit that I do not practice search with it.  I need to do that.

 

Mike

post #44 of 44

I wear mine almost all the time.  I figure there is always a chance that I will go bc and I also have a pair of sleds I keep on top.  Lot's of days, even if were not skiing in the bc,  I'll just take a spin to check things out.  

 

I can't tell you how many times I've heard, "mine's in my locker"!  See you later!

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