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MTB - Heal of hand goes numb on longer rides.

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

When I ride my MTB for an extended period of time, the heal of the palm of my hand kind of goes numb and tingles.  My guess is that is occurs because my bike is probably not ergonomically correct for me. However, I just bike recreationally for fun, and, lately I have been using my mountian bike more on road than off. 

 

I was hoping someone else had experience something similar to this and had an easy solution I could try.  The numbness doesn't bother me too badly, but it would be nice if I could eliminate it.

 

My bike is 92 GT Karakoram - no suspension other than my legs.

post #2 of 16

It sounds like your handlebars are not set up right, so you are not evenly balanced and have too much weight on your hands.  You probably need to change the height (rise) and/or length of your stem. There may be several things you can do with your existing parts. Some stems can be flipped upside down to give them more rise.  If you have spacers on your steerer tube that are above your stem you can move them below, thereby raising the stem and bars.

 

I suggest you go to a reputable bike shop and see what then can do. Setup starts with the correct seat position, and then to the handle bars in relation to that.  You may have to spend some $ on a new stem to get the right position.

post #3 of 16

Your best bet, if you're primarily riding on-road, is to get a hybrid, cyclecross, or road bike to be in the best position for that type of riding.

 

For your current bike, a riser stem, higher rise bars, or just slipping the seat forward a few mm may solve this. Your best bet is to have a qualified shop take a look at your position on the bike.

 

If all else fails, a QUALITY set of ergonomic grips, correctly sized and properly mounted, may also ease some of this.

post #4 of 16

the bike is old and not helping, drop bars are WAY more comfortable for road riding.

 

second ergons will help you out alot with flat bar as will bar ends but really for on road riding my MTB would make my hand and everything else go crazy for too long. ergon and bar end will mask the issues for roughly 40 bucks total.

 

Id look on craigslist for a used but quality older roadish bike that fits you better. 100 bucks can actually get you something nice.

post #5 of 16
Thread Starter 

Thanks All, for the suggestions.  Yes, the bike is old.  Right now, I do not get to ride too often and I am not hard core about it, so I am just trying to keep the old bike going.  I will continue to adapt it.  If I get more serious about it, I would look to step up to a newer bike.  Thanks, again.

post #6 of 16

Add some bar ends; they allow you to change your grip positon, which helps revieve pressure.

post #7 of 16


sounds like you have all your weight over your wrists? I had a $30 bike fitting and had a few changes made that resulted in huge changes.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by skidding View Post

Thanks All, for the suggestions.  Yes, the bike is old.  Right now, I do not get to ride too often and I am not hard core about it, so I am just trying to keep the old bike going.  I will continue to adapt it.  If I get more serious about it, I would look to step up to a newer bike.  Thanks, again.

post #8 of 16


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post

 ergon and bar end will mask the issues for roughly 40 bucks total.

 

^This.

 

Also, given some core strength,  the force you put on the front half of the pedal circle helps lift the weight off the handlebars.    Using taller gears and becoming a stronger cyclist will help mask the fit issues.

post #9 of 16

I've had the same problem.  I have 2 mountain bikes, one an old school, fully rigid mtb and a full suspension mtb.  I hardly ever had my hands go numb on my rigid bike or my full suspension bike when I rode it on trails.  When I ride it on the road, my hands go numb, just as you explained, both on the full suspension and most definitely on my rigid bike (I've recently 'converted' my rigid to a road by swapping out for road tires). Ergonomics and a good professional fitting will definitely help - although,  I agree with Volklgirl and BushwackerinPA, that you'd be better served with a road specific bike, if you plan on doing more road riding.  Just adding 'comfy' grips and wearing gel padded gloves won't really help much (maybe 5% improvement).  If you're just a casual rider and don't want to invest in a road bike, try a 'fitting' at a good local bike shop.

post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by ILOJ View Post

I've had the same problem.  I have 2 mountain bikes, one an old school, fully rigid mtb and a full suspension mtb.  I hardly ever had my hands go numb on my rigid bike or my full suspension bike when I rode it on trails.  When I ride it on the road, my hands go numb, just as you explained, both on the full suspension and most definitely on my rigid bike (I've recently 'converted' my rigid to a road by swapping out for road tires). Ergonomics and a good professional fitting will definitely help - although,  I agree with Volklgirl and BushwackerinPA, that you'd be better served with a road specific bike, if you plan on doing more road riding.  Just adding 'comfy' grips and wearing gel padded gloves won't really help much (maybe 5% improvement).  If you're just a casual rider and don't want to invest in a road bike, try a 'fitting' at a good local bike shop.


try not using padded gloves, quite often then create pressure points.

 

to the OP and to anyone else

 

FYI I have been running ergons for years. My hands use to go numb on rocky/technical singletrack especially after the 20 miles mark. They help slightly with the roads. This year I added Bar ends. Dorky I know but they work and make nontechnical climbs and road sections in enduro races way more comfortable.

 

I did a 25 mile and 45 mile XC race in the past weekend and had no pain whats so ever from my hands.

 

setup

fairly upright rider position

non padded full fingered gloves

ergon grips

titec bar ends

 

lastly more of issue on singletrack but making the brakes so you dont have to bend your wrist or reach far makes a huge difference as well.

 

post #11 of 16
Thread Starter 

 As ILOJ mentioned, I really don't notice much on trails, probably because I am always adjusting my position and the ride is much more active.  I do notice it when I am in a static position for long periods of time.  I guess that makes perfect sense.  Thanks for all suggestions.  At the very least, I should be able to improve the my situation.

post #12 of 16

Ergons.....sounds like what I need, I too have hand issues when riding my full suspension MTB on asphalt for too long; this even after getting a taller stem and higher rise bars and bar ends.

post #13 of 16

I bought some Egrons on my full suspension Niner (based on a post last year by BwPA) and have been loving them.  I have always used bar ends, because I like the additional position for roads, climbing on trails, and particularly for standing.  I got the extended bar ends because the shorter straight ones tend to catch bushes.  I use wide bars, and the longer curved in extensions allow me to go through brush, thistle, and branches without snagging, and with protected hands.

 

I really like the palm support, but an unanticipated bonus was that they also support you palms when using the extensions, which was always the more uncomfortable position with regular grips.  The angle of the grips and the extensions can be adjusted independently, and I think the key is to get the grips rotated to the correct position so that the palm is just lightly pressured during normal riding.  IMO they help climbing, descending, and on the flats.  The long extension C3 model was about $60, which seems like a lot, but is really not much more than good grips and bar ends, and way more comfortable. I got the Gripshift specific model, and the work well with my shifters.

 

Our local shop has some sm and lg demo Ergon grips and told me that everyone who tried them bought a pair.


Edited by mudfoot - 7/2/10 at 1:34pm
post #14 of 16

After trying several models of ergonomic grips 2 years ago, I ended up with the Ergon GX1 Leichtbau Team Edition as they're lighter and smaller to better fit my girlie hands. Unlike cheaper, symmetrical grips, the Ergons are side-specific with a cut out underneath to allow an almost complete finger wrap for better grip and control. I couldn't be happier with them on my 29er, but now I'm trying to justify the cost to put them on all my other bikes .

post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by volklgirl View Post

After trying several models of ergonomic grips 2 years ago, I ended up with the Ergon GX1 Leichtbau Team Edition as they're lighter and smaller to better fit my girlie hands. Unlike cheaper, symmetrical grips, the Ergons are side-specific with a cut out underneath to allow an almost complete finger wrap for better grip and control. I couldn't be happier with them on my 29er, but now I'm trying to justify the cost to put them on all my other bikes .


they slide of an on so easily its like 2 minutes to swap. That what I did till I got a fleet of them:).

post #16 of 16

Some thing you could try would be moving your saddle back on the rails about  2cm and seeing if that helps the issue.

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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Off-Season Sports & The Lighter Side › Cycling › MTB - Heal of hand goes numb on longer rides.