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Definition of irony - automatic safety bar almost breaks Moms neck - Page 2

post #31 of 46

Chairlifts are heavy equipment. You really should pay attention when using the lift. Perhaps your supervisor could give you a refresher on safe lift use.

 

When children are in your care, you should be more careful, not less .

Quote:
Originally Posted by tetonpwdrjunkie View Post

I ski close to seven days a week and mostly ski bell to bell.  That's a lot of lift rides and bars being lowered.  I get a bit of a thump a few times a week when I forget to grab the bar as my butt hits the chair.  Sometimes I'm helping load kids on the Tewinot beginners chair and am pre-occupied.  Sometimes I am talking with a student and forget.  Sometimes I am just gaping.  I like it when the person lowering the bar calls it out and waits a moment before slamming it down.
 


 
post #32 of 46

Please!  I think you know exactly what I mean, but I will spell it out for you.  I don't generally ski with kids, although I am trained in child specific instruction and lift procedure.  Kids instructors will often have a class of up to eight kids.  We like to have instructors with kids on lift rides when possible.  I will sometimes take a few of another instructors kids up the lift with me.  The general procedure is to put the weakest one on your right side and the stronger on your left.  As you come up to the lift you can signal the operator for a slow down if necessary and the operator can move in and help with the kid on your left as you lift the kid on the right onto the chair.  It's a pretty well oiled system.  At this point I am bent over a bit and am pre-occupied relative to the bar because I am focused on the kids.  The bar that hits me is generally lowered by one of the other kids or an adult single.  The bar doesn't have much mass and doesn't hit hard, but it's mildly annoying.  I smile and make a joke, then take the opportunity to talk about safety and the code for a moment.  As for lift training....  I would be happy to take any remedial training that my supervisor thinks is necessary.  He actually has solid confidence in my abilities and judgment as reflected in my evaluations.  I train every year in lift evacuation in the fall. 
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post

Chairlifts are heavy equipment. You really should pay attention when using the lift. Perhaps your supervisor could give you a refresher on safe lift use.

 

When children are in your care, you should be more careful, not less .


 
post #33 of 46

I learned how to ride a chairlift on a Riblet, and I turned out just fine.  What's wrong with this other people that "must" have a bar?

post #34 of 46

Personally, I MUST have a footrest.  Shattered a knee cap and I just need to rest that knee in between runs or I can't ski as long a day.  I notify everyone the bar is coming down and wait for them to move their heads and watch as I pull it down.  And if you're tall, tuck your feet behind it, it can be done easily if your legs are that long.  If I don't have a foot rest then I can hardly get off the chair at the top, so the lift without a foot rest I avoid.  When I was at Alta even before I shattered the knee cap I had to wait at the top of the lifts before I was able to ski down because my circulation was cut off by the time I reached the tops of the lifts.  The edge of the seats there was just hitting in the wrong spot on my legs for some reason.  Major pain in the *&^,
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by FujativeOCR View Post

I learned how to ride a chairlift on a Riblet, and I turned out just fine.  What's wrong with this other people that "must" have a bar?

post #35 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post

Do you "get smacked all the time" or do you put your "hand on it right away to stop people from lowering it to(o) quickly"? If the former, yes that's stupid. Why do you need so much time to prepare for the lowering of the safety bar anyway? Anticipate and react, don't just sit there gaping.
 


I have had the bar lowered on me before my feet were off the ground sometime while picking up small children.  

 

I would prefer for there to be no bars anywhere for this simple matter. The raising and lowering of the bars causes more people to fall of than anything else.

 

FYI I will say something about hoping to save the next poor soul from getting knocked in the back of the head. 

post #36 of 46

I feel you Brother!  I like the foot rest as well.  Thanks for the etiquette.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Personally, I MUST have a footrest.  Shattered a knee cap and I just need to rest that knee in between runs or I can't ski as long a day.  I notify everyone the bar is coming down and wait for them to move their heads and watch as I pull it down.  And if you're tall, tuck your feet behind it, it can be done easily if your legs are that long.  If I don't have a foot rest then I can hardly get off the chair at the top, so the lift without a foot rest I avoid.  When I was at Alta even before I shattered the knee cap I had to wait at the top of the lifts before I was able to ski down because my circulation was cut off by the time I reached the tops of the lifts.  The edge of the seats there was just hitting in the wrong spot on my legs for some reason.  Major pain in the *&^,
 


 
post #37 of 46

Hey Bushwacker...  Sounds like you might need some remedial chairlift training from your supervisor.  It's heavy equipment!

post #38 of 46

If you can't safely get youngsters onto the lift, please ask for assistance.

post #39 of 46

Oooh then you and me would have problems.  I must be able to move my legs freely on the lift.  I can't stand sitting still on the lift, ESPECIALLY if you're trying to make me tuck my feet BEHIND the bar, thus putting more pressure on the back of my legs, probably making my legs fall asleep, cutting off my circulation by the time I reach the top.  Sometimes, the edge of the seats just hit the wrong spot when people make me do this.  The normal solution is for me to keep my arm in front of the side bar before it comes down, so nobody does this to me.  People putting the bar down are a major pain in the $#&!!!

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Personally, I MUST have a footrest.  Shattered a knee cap and I just need to rest that knee in between runs or I can't ski as long a day.  I notify everyone the bar is coming down and wait for them to move their heads and watch as I pull it down.  And if you're tall, tuck your feet behind it, it can be done easily if your legs are that long.  If I don't have a foot rest then I can hardly get off the chair at the top, so the lift without a foot rest I avoid.  When I was at Alta even before I shattered the knee cap I had to wait at the top of the lifts before I was able to ski down because my circulation was cut off by the time I reached the tops of the lifts.  The edge of the seats there was just hitting in the wrong spot on my legs for some reason.  Major pain in the *&^,
 


 
post #40 of 46

I guess you haven't met ME yet.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by FujativeOCR View Post

Oooh then you and me would have problems.  I must be able to move my legs freely on the lift.  I can't stand sitting still on the lift, ESPECIALLY if you're trying to make me tuck my feet BEHIND the bar, thus putting more pressure on the back of my legs, probably making my legs fall asleep, cutting off my circulation by the time I reach the top.  Sometimes, the edge of the seats just hit the wrong spot when people make me do this.  The normal solution is for me to keep my arm in front of the side bar before it comes down, so nobody does this to me.  People putting the bar down are a major pain in the $#&!!!

 


 
post #41 of 46

In NY State its the law.  Safety bar must go down in NY state or else they pull your ticket. 
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by FujativeOCR View Post

Oooh then you and me would have problems.  I must be able to move my legs freely on the lift.  I can't stand sitting still on the lift, ESPECIALLY if you're trying to make me tuck my feet BEHIND the bar, thus putting more pressure on the back of my legs, probably making my legs fall asleep, cutting off my circulation by the time I reach the top.  Sometimes, the edge of the seats just hit the wrong spot when people make me do this.  The normal solution is for me to keep my arm in front of the side bar before it comes down, so nobody does this to me.  People putting the bar down are a major pain in the $#&!!!

 


 
post #42 of 46



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by sinbad7 View Post

I wear a backpack and it does compromise the whole thing to an extent.  My helmet comes in handy on occasion when over zealous people crack me on the head with the bar.

 

What happens when the lift breaks down and you have to evacuate people from the chairs?  I'm guessing there's a manual override to the safety bar that you can't reach from the seat.

 

It all sounds too 'tricked up' for my liking.  What on earth is wrong with a manual safety bar?  How 'hands free' does the world have to get?  That accident should have been foreseeable by anyone with common sense, assuming there is no sensor that went haywire.



Wont' comment on the thing, clearly an accident and clearly someone "forgot" to insert a sensor in the design. And for such a silly piece of electronic, someone has risked or incurred into serious injury.

But as for backpacks...

Here where I ski, there are clear signs instructing people to take backpacks off their back before sitting on a chairlift. If you don't do, the lifties will remind you. If even after this you won't take it off...well, YMMW.

post #43 of 46

I like to slip my backpack over the back of the chair so that the back of the chair is between my pack and my back.  This lets me sit all the way back instead of being on edge.  This works for me, but you need to be careful that there are no loose dangley things on your pack to get snagged when you attempt to unload at the top.  

post #44 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post

If you can't safely get youngsters onto the lift, please ask for assistance.


this is a case were the public trying to help hurts. if the other people did nothing it would be great!

post #45 of 46

 

 

how about a sesnor that won't let the bar down until after the first three feet of fwd movement??

post #46 of 46


Normally I would proceed to bag on New York for allowing such a silly law into existence.  However I heard just today that they are increasing the tax on cigarettes there another $1.60 or something per pack, bringing the total per pack to around $10.  So I guess New York breaks even on this one.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by catskills View Post

In NY State its the law.  Safety bar must go down in NY state or else they pull your ticket. 
 


 
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